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Meet John Worth

John WorthJohn Worth is the Director of Graduate Professional Development at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU).  He created a career and professional development program for students in and alumni from the graduate business programs at VCU.  John conducts workshops and webinars on career related topics and meets individually with students and alumni to help them achieve their career goals. Before joining VCU, John was the Director of Alumni and Executive MBA Career Management at the UNC Kenan- Flagler Business School. Prior to that, John was the Director of Career Consulting at the UVA Darden School of Business.

Four Reasons Why Recruiters May be Neglecting You

I recently read an interesting article in the Washington Post by Arden Davidson entitled “Four Reasons Why Recruiters May Be Neglecting You”.  I speak with many people who are frustrated and confused as to why they don’t hear from recruiters in a more timely manner when they are applying for (and interviewing for) a new job.  This article provides some very good insights into what often is happening behind the scenes.  Enjoy!

Four reasons why recruiters may be neglecting you

  • The Washington Post Sunday
  • 20 Jan 2019
  • This special advertising section was prepared by independent writer Arden Davidson. The production of this section did not involve the news or editorial staff of The Washington Post.

You’ve found a position you really want, and you’re thrilled with how well the interview went. The recruiter has given you positive feedback, and you’re expecting an offer any day. But time passes without an offer—or a rejection—and you’re frustrated and confused. When a recruiter goes dark on you, not returning calls or emails, you wonder what you did wrong. But don’t overthink the situation or lose hope. Recruiters may be neglecting you for a number of reasons, many of which have nothing to do with you personally.

Here are the four most common reasons why recruiters seem to be dodging you, even when they may still be interested.

  1. A difference in priorities

Landing this job is your number one priority. You feel like your whole life is in someone else’s hands, and waiting for a decision can be agonizing. If you’re working someplace where you’re miserable, everything that goes wrong triggers a daydream about how much better life would be at the “other place.” You’ve spent a great deal of time thinking about how this new role will affect every aspect of your existence. For the recruiter, however, filling this position is just one part of a very long to-do list. She has daily responsibilities, including other candidates to interview and openings to fill. So while you’re driving yourself crazy trying to figure out why you’re not getting a response, the recruiter may just not have had time to focus on you or the position this week. Just remember—until you get an official rejection, you’re still in the running. If the process seems to be playing out in slow motion, it could just be because what you consider life-changing, the recruiter sees as just one small part of her job.

  1. A tough decision

Chances are, you’re not the only qualified candidate who applied for the position. The recruiter and other decision-makers may consider you part of a select group of high-potential candidates. They simply cannot decide which one of you is the best fit for the job. If you’re not hearing back from the recruiter, it may simply be that he does not have anything to tell you right now. Therefore, he may not want to return your calls or emails until he can give you a solid answer. He knows what you are calling about but doesn’t want to call you back to inform you he doesn’t have any new information. Yes, it may seem a bit rude or unprofessional, but to the recruiter, it’s merely an efficient use of his time.

  1. The situation has changed

When the employer posted the recruiting ad, it was pretty clear Trisha would be leaving the firm, or the marketing department had too much on its plate. But things may have changed since then. It’s not uncommon for a company to think it needs to hire a new employee only to have circumstances change. That does not mean, however, that they have completely nixed the idea of hiring someone new. They’re waiting to see how the situation pans out before taking any more steps forward. This uncertainty can leave you in limbo for quite some time. It can also explain why you are not getting a solid offer or a clear rejection.

  1. Red tape

The decision to hire someone rarely rests in the hands of just one individual. There are typically multiple decision-makers with varying levels of input and responsibility. There may even be hiring committees in which all members must come to a consensus, no matter how divergent their views. All of this red tape is going to significantly prolong the hiring process. So even if the recruiter said you would probably have an answer by the end of next week, the timeline is not set in stone. “Next week” might be the ideal, but it’s not necessarily the reality. The process can stretch out even longer if certain members of the hiring committee are out of town, on vacation, or tied up with something that ranks higher on their priority list. Add to that the typical HR bureaucracy, and you might not hear back from the recruiter for over a month. It’s not you. It’s them.

It’s hard not to take a recruiter’s vanishing act as a form of rejection. But the reality is, you still have a chance until you’re notified otherwise. There are numerous reasons why recruiters may be going dark on you that aren’t personal at all. Before you throw in the towel, think about the situation from their perspective. And above all, be patient.

 

Twas the Night Before Christmas; My Job Search Looked Bleak

Twas the holiday season;  my job search looked bleak.

My network was dwindling, which made me feel weak.

My resume listed my jobs and my skills,

And my letters and emails added some frills,

At this point my search had resulted in naught,

It seemed my best contacts had left me to rot.

And so while the snow did fall silent and wet,

I forgot all my worries and chose not to fret.

My children were nestled all snug in their beds

With presents from bonuses lodged in their heads.

My wife in pajamas and I in my suit

Had just settled in – my computer to boot.

I went to my laptop with intent to begin

Just one final search of what’s new in LinkedIn

I clicked on my profile and scrolled down the screen

And saw my endorsements were woefully lean.

But there to my wondering eyes did appear,

A posting that shifted me into high gear!

A letter I crafted to make me sound great;

This job would be mine – I knew it was fate.

My resume tweaked, I began to apply,

But the job application near caused me to cry.

I entered the info and responded as needed

Till my temperature rose and I soon became heated.

It was then I decided I needed a break

To avoid all the errors I knew I would make.

So my wife and I opened a bottle of wine

And drink it we did as we casually dined.

So now with our spirits most certainly high,

My fingers all over that keyboard did fly.

I continued to feel that this job was a fit,

And so, with a smile, I clicked on “submit”.

Since all through the house there was nary a peep,

It was then I fell into a very deep sleep.

Soon visions of interviews danced in my head;

The recruiters just loved every word that I said.

The questions came fast and some were quite hard,

But none of them bothered this slumbering bard.

And all of them thought that my answers were great:

A terrific addition they knew I would make.

hey made me an offer they told me was rare

But, given my skills, they did hope it was fair.

I looked at them all with such confident eyes

And said in a voice that I hoped would sound wise:

“In this job I’m convinced a success I will be

And so I accept with great passion and glee”.

A sound from the house then did cause me to wake

And so a deep breath I did make myself take.

I fought off the urge then to utter a scream,

For might it be true that this job was a dream?

It was then that I heard a loud sound from the roof

It was Santa, his reindeer, and the stomp of a hoof.

With a wink of his eye and a twist of his head,

He gave me to know I had nothing to dread.

Then he uttered these words right before he took flight:

“Happy Job Search to all and to all a good night!”

         Copyright John Worth 2013

How To Gracefully Leave Your Job

I recently read an excellent article in the Washington Post Jobs section in the Sunday November 11 edition.  The title of the print article was  “How to gracefully leave your job” and it contains some very good advice about how to leave a job while cementing the good reputation you have built  Among the valuable advice provided is as follows:

“Before you give notice, take this opportunity to think about the breadth and depth of your tenure.  This moment of reflection and celebration will help you manage your emotions as you prepare to leave.  Set aside an hour to write a list of your experiences – learn from your lows and celebrate your highs. ”

Here is the link to the full article: https://jobs.washingtonpost.com/article/the-right-way-to-say-goodbye-to-your-job/.

Enjoy!

Using LinkedIn to Apply to Jobs

I have conducted many workshops on “Leveraging LinkedIn to Build and Enhance Your Brand” and counseled a number of people on this topic as well.  I recently read a very interesting article by Dandan Zhu, the CEO and Founder of Dandan Global entitled “Should I apply to Jobs through my LinkedIn profile or resume?”

The article contains some excellent ideas and suggestions for applying to jobs through Linkedin as well some insights on what recruiters are looking for from candidates who apply.  Enjoy!

Should I apply to jobs through my LinkedIn profile or resume?

By Dandan Zhu, Top Billing Headhunter, Career Coach, CEO and Founder, Dandan Global

The job search process has been dramatically altered by the internet, for a large part because of the transformative nature of LinkedIn on recruitment practices.

As a headhunter, I am on the receiving end of applicants using LinkedIn and traditional job portals. I have access to LinkedIn Recruiter, a VERY expensive tool that allows us headhunters to post LinkedIn job advertisements thus providing people like YOU the option to apply directly via LinkedIn.

Similarly, my internal systems post my advertisements on every other type of job portal, like: Monster, CareerBuilder, Indeed, Simplyhired, and a myriad of other “job aggregator sites” as they’re called.

Let’s talk about the pros and cons of each of these submission methods, so you can decide which way you want to go.

#1. Applying through LinkedIn with your profile:

What happens after you submit?

At the receiving end of your submission, the person who posted the job (the job poster) will have most likely elected the automatic ALERT option so that they receive an email every time someone applies to their LinkedIn job advertisement (advert). The email body consists of bullets directly from your LinkedIn summary/job experience content.

Your resume is usually also on that email as an attachment*. If you have a great resume that is RELEVANT, only then you’ll receive some type of communication from the job poster or their boss (phone or email or LinkedIn message).

If you’re not of interest, you will not hear back. You’ll have to chase the job poster for feedback. If you’re really passionate about the job, it doesn’t hurt to reach out directly to the job poster. If you don’t hear back after repeated attempts, again, you’re doing something wrong in terms of self-promotion and content/format/job experience and they are still, sadly, not interested.

*If your resume is not attached for whatever reason, the job poster will still evaluate your LinkedIn profile because they PAID for the advert! They want to receive good applicants, but usually the people who apply are not a fit, so if you ARE of interest, you WILL hear back. Especially in Candidate-dry markets; recruiters are dying for the best candidates and stalking the market, thus if you’re a fit, you’ll definitely hear about it.

PROS: The application process is easy and you can apply to multiple jobs with relatively little work. You don’t have to fill out complicated forms on various company sites, you can just simply attach your resume and press submit on the LinkedIn platform. The job poster will receive your resume directly in their inbox.

Also, LinkedIn adverts DO expire (live for one month, renewable), so most likely the role you’re applying to on LinkedIn is relatively recent, and is probably still LIVE if it’s still posted or if the job poster is somewhat responsible and will keep tabs on their marketing channels. Again, these are expensive adverts, so most likely the jobs posted on LinkedIn are REAL, relatively recent, and actively responding to applicants deemed to pass the initial evaluation.

CONS: If you don’t have a relevant, clear, and strategic LinkedIn profile, you’re dead in the water. What constitutes a good LinkedIn profile? You’ll have to request my answer so I can address this separately. 🙂 Your LinkedIn profile and your general status in the industry will come into play here. Most likely, if you’re very experienced in the industry/job that you’re applying for, you’ll have mutual connections, groups, and keywords with the job poster.

If you don’t have any mutual contacts, any relevant information, or TOO MUCH INFORMATION, that will count against you! If you’re applying for a finance job, and the job poster sees that your LinkedIn profile is filled with marketing, sales, accounting, operations, and some finance key words, you’re damaging the chances of obtaining an interview request because you’re over-marketing and diminishing your relevancy to the niche skill/job that they’re recruiting for. Other candidates with more relevance will be placed ahead of you in the roster.

By trying to be a master of all, you’ll actually be viewed as a master of none!

Remember: Less is more.

#2. Applying with your resume to a job directly:

What happens after you submit?

Your resume will be lodged into the internet black hole. Hopefully the person on the receiving end is actually monitoring the applicants, which may be or may not be the case! People are busy: the hiring entity on the receiving end of your resume at the company could be an HR person who has just gone to vacation, or to an internal recruiter, who is handling 20 other roles, so who’s to say that either of them will actually catch your resume on the receiving end for that particular job posting?

PROs: I really don’t see any pros to submit to companies’ websites these days or even other job portals like the ones I mentioned. Too little control and your information is too accessible for identity theft and variety of other issues.

CONs: It’s a lot of work to submit directly – you have to fill out different forms for different companies/jobs, provide customized Cover Letters for each (that won’t be read anyways).

SO WHAT’S THE BEST STRATEGY MOVING FORWARD?

No matter what, recruiters/HR staff are accustomed now to using LinkedIn! Even the hiring manager who is responsible to oversee the new hire prefers to look up the candidate on LinkedIn before the phone interview!

You should:

#1. Make sure your LinkedIn profile is totally in line with your resume, so that you’re telling a congruent, consistent, and true story. People will be turned off by discrepancies or irrelevance. Make sure you have a tight marketing message that proves you are who they’re looking for.

#2. Use LinkedIn to reach out to hiring mangers, recruiters, and ex-colleagues directly! Write to them! You can purchase inmails or even get free inmail trials or find their email address online. Just reach out directly, skip the line and the wait!

Of course, there are lots of nuances and steps you’ll have to learn, but this is a starting point!

Disclaimer: LinkedIn does not allow for affiliations, I declare that my company, Dandan Global, has no affiliation with LinkedIn in any way.

Tips for Managing a Late Career Transition

The term “late career transition” can have many definitions.  To some people, it may mean that they don’t want to work at the same hectic pace they have been.  For others, it could mean that they are forced to find a new job after 10, 15 or 20 years with a single employer.  Others think of it as an opportunity to try something very different, pursue a long-standing passion, or supplement their retirement income.  Next Avenue’s Kerry Hannon recently quoted a University of Michigan study that says “about 40% of Americans who were still working when they turned 62 had moved to a new occupation sometime after age 55”.

According to the Forbes Coaches Council, “In today’s job market, where job-hopping, industry-wide downsizing and ‘second act careers” are all prevalent, it seems that anything goes – and that can be a good thing for professionals who want to (or have to) change careers in their 40s or 50s” (or beyond).  Whatever the situation may be, late career transitions can be intimidating, nerve wracking and, for some people, downright frightening.  Here are some suggestions that may help.

“Know Your Local Resources.”  Wherever you live, become familiar with the resources available that can help with your transition.   For example, the Charlottesville, VA area has a wealth of resources that can help people returning to work or seeking to make a transition.  The Piedmont Virginia Community College (PVCC) offers non-credit courses and certificate programs in areas as diverse as voice acting, business and accounting, computer applications, health care, carpentry, brewing, wine marketing and solar technician training to name just a few. According to Andre Luck, Career Service Manager at the school. PVCC is the only one of the 23 community colleges in Virginia that have more part-time than full-time students.  They also have an Outreach Advisor whose role is to reach out to the non-traditional adult population and often are approached by companies who are trying to fill skilled positions.  One such example is the Cybersecurity Certificate Program.

Another resource is the Community Investment Collaborative (CIC), whose new co-working space is designed to give new small business owners a foothold in downtown Charlottesville. The CIC provides advice on branding their businesses as well as managing finances and creating well-developed business plans.  In addition, the Center for Non-Profit Excellence provides information and support for non-profit organizations in the area.  Their directory of local non-profits can be a great resource for people looking for volunteer roles, part-time jobs or even career opportunities.

 “Get Current!”  If you have not looked for a job in many years, you need to get up to speed on current job search processes and resources that are commonly used.  Your marketing materials (resume, cover letter, and references) cannot be taken for granted.  Your resume needs to be just as effective as those of other candidates with whom you will be competing.  If you have not already done so, join LinkedIn and create a profile and summary that describes you and what you bring to the table, as well as the specific skills you want to emphasize.

Most companies will require you to complete an on-line job application (rather than mailing a resume and cover letter as you may have done in the past).  While these applications can sometimes be frustrating, they usually are required when applying for a job and require care and attention to detail.

As you talk to people in roles that interest you, be sure to ask if there are any technology skills or certifications that are required.  Going back to school for a new college degree may not be in the cards, but completing a training course or obtaining a certificate can greatly increase your marketability.  If you are pursuing a new industry or functional area, gain an understanding of the lingo and terms often used in these areas.

 “Get smart” on this new industry or job function.  Expect an initial level of skepticism about your knowledge of this new industry or job.  Learn about trends and current events in the industry.  Identify the major players (and their competitors).  Network with people who are in the roles that interest you.  Don’t wait for this skepticism to emerge in the form of a question.  Demonstrate your knowledge throughout your conversations and in the questions you ask.

Be positive!  It is likely that you will be interviewing with people significantly younger than you.  Demonstrate that you have the skills and knowledge as well as the mental and physical energy to be successful and that you will truly enjoy the job.  If you are excited about this opportunity, communicate your excitement loudly and clearly!

Marketing Your Company Through Your Recruiting Process

I recently read a very interesting article in the Richmond Times-Dispatch by Sue Durnwirth entitled “Job Candidates Are Customers, Too”.  The article appeared in the Sunday August 16 edition of the paper.

Having spent 16 years as an undergraduate and graduate recruiter (prior to my most recent roles in university career management and professional development), I must say that I couldn’t agree with Sue more.  In her article, she quoted a number of statistics from surveys conducted by CareerBuilder to back up her view that there often is a disconnect between how managers and business owners view their hiring practices and the experiences candidates have with these same practices.  Here are a few examples:

“Eighty-two percent (of managers surveyed) said there was little or no negative impact to their business if their candidates had a negative experience.”  Compare this to “68 percent (of candidates) agreed that a positive or negative experience during the application process would affect their decision if offered employment by that company.” and that “69 percent would be less likely to buy from the company if they had a bad experience during the interview.”  She goes on to say “If you have ever felt the sting of having your job offer declined by your top candidate, note that this could be critical for winning your piece of the on-going ‘war for talent.”

Many companies, recruiters and H.R professionals became complacent during the recession and in times when unemployment was high.  They felt they were in a “buyer’s market” and that they could hire anyone they wanted because there was little competition for the best people.  News flash: the economy is improving steadily, unemployment continues to be low, the job market is strengthening, and search firms and recruiting agencies are being much more active. Candidates are much more likely to have multiple job offers and will be weighing how they are treated during the hiring process as a key aspect of a company’s culture and how they treat their employees.

I am reminded of one of the nicest compliments my consulting firm at the time received from an outstanding student at a highly ranked MBA school after attending a number of our recruiting events and interview process:  “If you treat your clients they way you treated me as a recruit, I would hire your firm tomorrow.”

It doesn’t get any better than that.

‘Twas the Holiday Season; My Job Search Looked Bleak…

‘Twas the holiday season;  my job search looked bleak.

My network was dwindling, which made me feel weak.

My resume listed my jobs and my skills,

And my letters and emails added some frills,

 

At this point my search had resulted in naught,

It seemed my best contacts had left me to rot.

And so while the snow did fall silent and wet,

I forgot all my worries and chose not to fret.

 

My children were nestled all snug in their beds

With presents from bonuses lodged in their heads.

My wife in pajamas and I in my suit

Had just settled in – my computer to boot.

 

I went to my laptop with intent to begin

Just one final search of what’s new in LinkedIn

I clicked on my profile and scrolled down the screen

And saw my endorsements were woefully lean.

 

But there to my wondering eyes did appear,

A posting that shifted me into high gear!

A letter I crafted to make me sound great;

This job would be mine – I knew it was fate.

 

My resume tweaked, I began to apply,

But the job application near caused me to cry.

I entered the info and responded as needed

Till my temperature rose and I soon became heated.

 

It was then I decided I needed a break

To avoid all the errors I knew I would make.

So my wife and I opened a bottle of wine

And drink it we did as we casually dined.

 

So now with our spirits most certainly high,

My fingers all over that keyboard did fly.

I continued to feel that this job was a fit,

And so, with a smile, I clicked on “submit”.

 

Since all through the house there was nary a peep,

It was then I fell into a very deep sleep.

Soon visions of interviews danced in my head;

The recruiters just loved every word that I said.

 

The questions came fast and some were quite hard,

But none of them bothered this slumbering bard.

And all of them thought that my answers were great:

A terrific addition they knew I would make.

 

They made me an offer they told me was rare

But, given my skills, they did hope it was fair.

I looked at them all with such confident eyes

And said in a voice that I hoped would sound wise:

 

“In this job I’m convinced a success I will be

And so I accept with great passion and glee”.

A sound from the house then did cause me to wake

And so a deep breath I did make myself take.

 

I fought off the urge then to utter a scream,

For might it be true that this job was a dream?

It was then that I heard a loud sound from the roof

It was Santa, his reindeer, and the stomp of a hoof.

 

With a wink of his eye and a twist of his head,

He gave me to know I had nothing to dread.

Then he uttered these words right before he took flight:

“Happy Job Search to all and to all a good night!”

 

Copyright John Worth 2013

 

Why Candidates Need To Be Patient During Their Job Searches

“I’m going to begin looking for a new job.  How long do you think it will take?”

“I applied for a new job over a month ago.  Why is it taking so long to hear anything?”

If I had a dollar for every time I have heard these questions, I would be a very wealthy man.  For many candidates, their job searches feel like an extended game of hurry up and wait.  In answering these questions, I often draw upon my experience in recruiting with (what was then) Coopers & Lybrand and Deloitte Consulting to describe how hiring processes really unfold.  Even the most organized and efficient hiring processes take time.  If anything happens along the way, delays result.  For example, let’s take a look at the timeline for what could be seen as an organized and efficient process:

June 1…Posting and job description is posted on the company website and selected job boards with a 30 day run and July 1 application deadline.

July 1…Screening of resumes begins with the goal of identifying 10 candidates to receive phone screens.

July 7…Candidates to receive phone screens are selected.  Phone screens are scheduled for July 7 to 21.

July 21…Phone screens completed and the best 5-7 candidates are selected for initial interviews.  Interviews will be scheduled during July 21 to August 7.

August 7…Initial interviews completed and 3 candidates selected for final interviews.

August 21…Final interviews completed and offer candidate selected.  Offer made and accepted.  Candidate requests 3 weeks notice with current employer before starting new job.

September 14…Candidate begins new job!

As you can see, the organized, efficient hiring process described above easily could take over 3 and a half months.  When you add in the possibility of vacations, work conflicts on both sides, and other examples of Murphy’s Law, not to mention the occasional reality of budget cuts and changing priorities, 3 and a half months can easily turn into 5 or 6.  What can candidates do?  What should recruiters do?

Candidates: Be sure to send follow-up emails and even personal notes to every person with whom you interview.  As the process moves along, send an occasional email to your recruiting contact reminding him/her of your continued interest in the company and excitement about the position.

Recruiters: Keep in frequent touch with your candidates throughout the process and let them know of any changes in scheduling or deadlines.  While this may sound obvious, if you tell a candidate that you will contact them in 2 weeks, CONTACT THEM IN 2 WEEKS!  Remember: you are marketing your company with your hiring process as well as the way you treat your candidates.

Beginning in January, I resolve to….

Quit smoking.

Eat healthier and lose weight.

Look for a new job.

For many people, New Year’s resolutions abound at this time of the year. All three of the above resolutions are certainly good ideas. Interestingly enough, they also have one thing in common: All three require a plan to succeed.

Some people procrastinate when looking for a new job because they don’t know where to begin or because they think it is too difficult. Some people become frustrated with sending out scores of résumés or responding to countless online job postings with no success. Often, their job searches fail due to the lack of a plan.

If looking for a new job is one of your New Year’s resolutions, begin with a plan. Identify the key drivers of your job search based upon what’s most important to you. Key drivers could be any of the following:

  • Location: The most important thing to me is to remain in this area. I’m open to any company in any industry.
  • Job function: I want to keep doing “what I do” and am open to any industry. I’m also open to other locations.
  • Industry: I want to leverage my industry expertise but in a different job function.

Obviously, your plan may be one of these or a combination of several. Identifying the key driver of your job search will make it easier to develop a list of companies to target. With this list, you can focus your research and networking efforts.

Looking for a new job still involves a good deal of hard work. However – as with quitting smoking, eating healthier or losing weight – having a plan can help you succeed. Happy New Year and good luck with your resolutions!

‘Twas the Night Before Christmas…

‘Twas The Night Before Christmas; My Job Search Looked Bleak…

 ‘Twas the night before Christmas; my job search looked bleak.

My network was dwindling, which made me feel weak.

My resume listed my jobs and my skills,

And my letters and emails added some frills,

At this point my search had resulted in naught,

It seemed my best contacts had left me to rot.

And so while the snow did fall silent and wet,

I forgot all my worries and chose not to fret.

My children were nestled all snug in their beds

With presents from bonuses lodged in their heads.

My wife in pajamas and I in my suit

Had just settled in – my computer to boot.

I went to my laptop with intent to begin

Just one final search of what’s new in LinkedIn

I clicked on my profile and scrolled down the screen

And saw my endorsements were woefully lean.

But there to my wondering eyes did appear,

A posting that shifted me into high gear!

A letter I crafted to make me sound great;

This job would be mine – I knew it was fate.

My resume tweaked, I began to apply,

But the job application near caused me to cry.

I entered the info and responded as needed

Till my temperature rose and I soon became heated.

It was then I decided I needed a break

To avoid all the errors I knew I would make.

So my wife and I opened a bottle of wine

And drink it we did as we casually dined.

So now with our spirits most certainly high,

My fingers all over that keyboard did fly.

I continued to feel that this job was a fit,

And so, with a smile, I clicked on “submit”.

Since all through the house there was nary a peep,

It was then I fell into a very deep sleep.

Soon visions of interviews danced in my head;

The recruiters just loved every word that I said.

The questions came fast and some were quite hard,

But none of them bothered this slumbering bard.

And all of them thought that my answers were great:

A terrific addition they knew I would make.

They made me an offer they told me was rare

But, given my skills, they did hope it was fair.

I looked at them all with such confident eyes

And said in a voice that I hoped would sound wise:

“In this job I’m convinced a success I will be

And so I accept with great passion and glee”.

A sound from the house then did cause me to wake

And so a deep breath I did make myself take.

I fought off the urge then to utter a scream,

For might it be true that this job was a dream?

It was then that I heard a loud sound from the roof

It was Santa, his reindeer, and the stomp of a hoof.

With a wink of his eye and a twist of his head,

He gave me to know I had nothing to dread.

Then he uttered these words right before he took flight:

“Happy Job Search to all and to all a good night!”