Archive | October, 2005

Exercise does the elderly body good

October 29, 2005

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From Baylor College of Medicine: Exercise can’t stop the aging process, but experts at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston say that for the elderly, whether it’s weight training, walking, swimming or biking, 30 minutes of exercise three to five times a week is a good prescription for aging. “It’s never too late to start […]

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We boost measles immunity, Now we need to look at Whooping Cough

October 28, 2005

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Whooping Cough Vaccine Not Just for Kids Anymore From St. Louis University In the first study of its kind, researchers at Saint Louis University have demonstrated that immunization with a new vaccine could potentially prevent more than a million cases of pertussis (whooping cough) each year in adolescents and adults. Most children are protected from […]

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Will new vasectomy surgery make men more likely to have tubes tied and prevent the need for women to take a pill?

October 28, 2005

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A new anesthetic technique for vasectomy that does not involve the use of needles has been shown to be safe and effective, according to a recent study presented by Dr. Marc Goldstein of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center’s Department of Urology. NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell is the first and only site in the Northeast to offer the […]

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Prevelance of Diabetes Increasing

October 28, 2005

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From the CDC: Diabetes now affects nearly 21 million Americans – or 7 percent of the U.S. population – and more than 6 million of those people do not know they have diabetes, according to the latest prevalence data released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This number represents an additional […]

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Chronic Disease

October 28, 2005

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Projected global deaths by cause, all ages, 2005 This graph from the lancet shows the burden of expected deaths from chronic disease world wide. I hope no one has a question about the need for better preventive medicine/public health interventions.

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Avian Flu expectations from the BMJ, Oct 26, 2005

October 24, 2005

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The lack of sustained human-to-human transmission suggests that this AH5N1 avian virus does not currently have the capacity to cause a human pandemic. But, given the known potential for antigenic shift—either from a gradual process of adaptive genetic mutation within the virus or by a snap gene reassortment with a human influenza A virus6—the virus […]

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Listen to your brain

October 22, 2005

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this press release from the Salk Institute reviews staff research that shows “We often make unwise choices although we should know better. Thunderstorm clouds ominously darken the horizon. We nonetheless go out without an umbrella because we are distracted and forget. But do we? Neurobiologists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies carried out experiments […]

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is early retirement unhealthy?

October 22, 2005

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An interesting study from this week’s BMJ suggests that early retirement may be something to avoid. However, this study was made for the petrochemical industry. I wonder if early retirement has the same effect in other industrial sectors?

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Further support for immunization

October 21, 2005

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No connection shown between vaccine and autism: There is no credible link between the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine and any long term disability, including Crohn’s disease and autism, a Cochrane Library review of 31 high quality studies concludes. The review also says that lack of confidence in the vaccine has caused great damage to […]

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A drop of pure gold

October 20, 2005

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From the Economist today is a wonderful story of how immunization may improve the economic outlook of poor countries. Dr Bloom and Dr Canning (from the HSPH) believed that previous attempts to quantify the non-medical benefits of vaccination had been too narrow. These had looked at such data as the cost of a programme per […]

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