Archive | April, 2006

Too much for too many

April 28, 2006

Comments Off

A quote from a discussion at a meeting reported in the BMJ today â€?CMS is clearly the big kahuna, paying out over $300 billion for health care last year. CMS is managing a “care improvement program”, a huge randomized trial of 20,000 Medicare enrollees, each of whom is in some sort of disease management program. […]

Continue reading...

Recommendations to Improve Preconception Health and Health Care

April 21, 2006

Comments Off

Today tthe MMWR released the Recommendations of the Preconception Work Group. All health directors and public health nurses will want to read and keep this set of recommendations.

Continue reading...

It must have been something I ate: diet pills!

April 21, 2006

Comments Off

An amusing story with a moral in today’s London Telegraph The argument runs that, for those who are either unable to stop eating or lack the ability to gauge when they are full, a drug that curbs appetite with negligible side effects could be a godsend. Very few diets actually work and those that have […]

Continue reading...

One More Activist Canard Bites the Dust.

April 20, 2006

Comments Off

Ethyl Mercury, used in dental amalgams does not cause mental retardation or other mental illnesses. This new study in JAMA this week clearly demonstrates lack of effect. The thoughtful accompanying editorial points out that more than one study may be needed to settle the issue is worth resding.. When we consider the millions of dollars […]

Continue reading...

Lancet Recommends use of Condoms in US foreign AID

April 19, 2006

Comments Off

In the April 15 Lancet an editorial focuses on the US AIDS/HIV prevention package, PEPFAR, provided through the WHO. PEPFAR hopes to secure US$15 billion in funding between 2004 and 2008. 15 countries that are especially badly affected by HIV will receive $9 billion between them: 12 countries from Africa, plus Guyana, Haiti, and Vietnam. […]

Continue reading...

Secondary Prevention for Diabetes important

April 14, 2006

Comments Off

In a strongly worded review published in the recent edition of The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), the head of the Johns Hopkins Diabetes Center urges physicians and patients to better use the blood-testing tools at hand to manage the disease and prevent most of its dire impact on the heart, kidneys, nerves […]

Continue reading...

Illich Redux!

April 14, 2006

Comments Off

In a recent blog I revisited Ivan Illich’s essay on the dangers of the medical profession to the health of the population. From the BMJ news this week is an interesting report: Disease awareness campaigns turn healthy people into patients. We need to be careful. the the medical marketplace can detract from the public health […]

Continue reading...

Put shellfish back on the “good” list

April 12, 2006

Comments Off

Another useful dietary update from the Mayo Clinic If you enjoy shellfish but are reluctant to eat it because of worries about cholesterol, take heart. Blue mussels, broiled scallops or a fine Maine lobster are actually heart-healthy protein sources. Most shellfish are not only low in cholesterol, but they can also be rich sources of […]

Continue reading...

Detecting Preschoolers at Risk for Vision Loss

April 12, 2006

Comments Off

A simple 3-second office screening test may enable pediatricians to identify amblyopia, or vision loss in one eye, in children as young as two, report ophthalmologists at Children’s Hospital Boston in the April Archives of Ophthalmology. Amblyopia, also known as “lazy eye,” affects 3 to 5 percent of all children and is the leading cause […]

Continue reading...

Health-related Information on the Web

April 8, 2006

Comments Off

This article from the CDC journal on Chronic Diseases researches health related information on the Web. The most important features of the Internet that would encourage its use for health information were ease of finding and using the information and clarity of the information provided. Internet use differed by sex and age and was strongly […]

Continue reading...