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Book Review: “Lupus: Everything You Need to Know”

Lupus: Everything You Need to Know by Robert G. Lahita, M.D., and Robert H. Phillips
Community Health Education Ctr  General Collection (RC924.5.L85 L34 1998)

Reviewed by Afomia Tigist, Community Health Education Center Intern

Lupus is a very complex disease and it can sometimes be hard to diagnose.  Lahita and Phillips explain that “it requires great effort to distinguish Lupus from other diseases or to establish any overlap syndromes” (Lupus 48).  It is sometimes called “the great imitator” because it mimics the symptoms and signs of other diseases.  There are three types of Lupus; systemic lupus, discoid lupus, and drug-induced lupus.  This book breaks down each type of lupus, so that the reader can differentiate between the three types.

This book is set up in a question-answer format and it really covers everything about lupus.  It starts out by describing lupus and what is happening in the body.  It then goes into the diagnostic process and the different tests that help in the diagnosis.  It discusses common symptoms and treatments of lupus.  It is an easy to read book and it defines some of the scientific terms used in some of the definitions.  This allows the reader to fully understand what lupus is and what changes occur in the body.  This book covers so many commonly asked questions, and near the end answers questions about how lupus impacts everyday life.

This book was particularly designed for patients with lupus.  This book can serve as a guide for patients and their families because it covers a lot of concerns and questions.  Readers can run into questions they never thought about, and this better allows them to understand the disease.  This book is a really good reference for people who want to know more about lupus

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Did You Know?

90 may be the new 85? The number of people 90 and older is on the rise. In 1980, there were 720,000 people aged 90 and older in the United States. In 2010, the number was 1.9 million. By 2050, it could be 9 million. – MedlinePlus Magazine