CTE White Paper on Online Teaching and Learning

The delivery of courses online is nearly as old as the web itself, but as with any innovation, some faculty members have been early adopters while others have watched the development with both interest and skepticism. As publishing and managing content on the web has become easier, and as the delivery of online courses has become increasingly more popular, more faculty members have begun exploring ways to offer their courses online.
There is a common perspective that moving a course online is primarily about designing and sequencing course content. While content is important, we also believe that recent changes on the web – toward a more social and interconnected space – have necessitated the rethinking of what it means to make the transition to online teaching and learning. The unprecedented access to information coupled with the ability by anyone to publish online are disrupting how one teaches and learns, raising questions in the minds of faculty as to whether their own practices should change.
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The CTE has authored a white paper, Building from Content to Community: [Re]Thinking the Transition to Online Teaching and Learning, that is intended to serve as a resource for faculty who are teaching online or are considering making a transition. We hope this paper serves as the starting point for conversation, and invite you to share your ideas by leaving a comment.
The paper is linked here. White Paper Online VCU (May 2009).pdf
We look forward to continuing the conversation.

7 Responses to CTE White Paper on Online Teaching and Learning

  1. athif February 11, 2011 at 11:14 pm #

    Aside from saving money on transportation costs, the online education courses allow people to postpone their education once an unexpected incident arises.

  2. Joseph: ESL Teacher Course Developer February 1, 2011 at 7:43 am #

    I appreciate the resource. However, in Texas, while online learning is a hot trend for a lot of reasons, many of those reasons seem to have little to do with student learning.
    For example,colleges and universities want to:
    * Move students online because campus is too crowded and constructing more buildings is too expensive
    * Hire 60% adjunct faculty, 40% full time to avoid paying benefits, buying computers, providing office space
    * Claim ownership of teachers’ online content, then let other teachers use your course
    * Building partnerships with Book Companies and earn commissions for students’ purchase of eTextbooks
    However, online teaching can prove to be too much work for a part time Adjunct.
    The problem with technology integration in teaching is that the technology can distract from curriculum content, and mask over the fact that the teacher is weak, either online or inside a classroom.
    Joseph Chmielewski, M.S., L.P.C.
    Want to see how I structured an online ESL teacher training course?

  3. vemma4900 November 20, 2010 at 2:23 pm #

    It is truly amazing how fast technology changes and how easy it is to publish information online and teach and online class as you said. I really look forward to reading the white paper provided as I have been very interested in teaching classes online via the internet.

  4. mamdoh August 23, 2010 at 3:36 am #

    The paper covers almost every tools needed to make online class more real-time and interactive. The best part of such tools is it can help stimulate more interest among students, increase their attention and help them understands fast. This is great because what we want is students who can digest each and every bit of knowledge and really understands their lessons.
    But one thing that I really concerned is about plagiarism. With too much content available online, what they do is just copy and paste online information (or “share” from their friends) and with a little bit of modification, they submit it and claim it was their own work. How can we stop this or at least lessens it so that students will come out with their own creative and original work?

  5. Jennifer July 29, 2010 at 1:57 pm #

    It is truly amazing how fast technology changes and how easy it is to publish information online and teach and online class as you said. I really look forward to reading the white paper provided as I have been very interested in teaching classes online via the internet.

  6. Michelle Pacansky-Brock February 4, 2010 at 3:49 pm #

    I just wanted to write and say thank you for this outstanding contribution to the field of online teaching and learning. It’s comprehensive, relevant and provocative. Excellent what new and experience online instructors need. I will be leveraging this as a resource and sharing it widely. Bravo!

  7. Jim May 25, 2009 at 5:33 pm #

    The paper covers both emergent ideas and fundamentals of online learning quite well. We’ll definitely share with faculty and instructional designers here at SDSU. Wondering, though, whether you are going to produce an executive summary, interactive web version, or something that might help those who won’t curl up with a 22-page paper to still benefit from your work?
    Thanks.