Monthly Archives: December 2009

How to Switch Careers: Uncle Sam’s Appeal – What you need to know to break into a new industry, land a government job or join a nonprofit.

By Anne Kates Smith, Senior Associate Editor

From Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine, January 2010

You can’t beat the job security of working for the federal government. A regular paycheck is partly what attracted Justin Harris, 34, to the government. Since last May, he’s been at the Environmental Protection Agency as a program specialist in the Office of International Affairs. Harris works on the China team to help advance EPA goals. What he lacks in environmental experience he makes up for in regional expertise. A native Californian, Harris speaks fluent Mandarin and had been living in Asia for years, working as a recruiter for law firms in Taiwan, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Taipei and Beijing. “As the economy started to tank, so did the deals I was doing,” says Harris. “That’s when I thought it would be a good time to look for a government position.”

Make that a great time. The federal government is expected to hire 273,000 workers over the next three years-and that’s a conservative estimate, says John Palguta, of Partnership for Public Service, a nonprofit that seeks to encourage public service and improve government recruiting.

The list of openings is impressive. It includes 54,000 in medicine and public health, 52,000 in security and protection, 11,000 in engineering, 12,000 in information technology, and 17,000 in accounting and budgeting. The Treasury Department is expected to hire 16,000; the Department of Justice, 19,000.

Visit WheretheJobsAre.org to see hiring projections listed by professional field or by agency. Chances are, you won’t have to live in the nation’s capital; 85% of federal-government jobs are located outside of the Washington, D.C., area, and 44,000 of them are overseas. Visit BestPlacestoWork.org to see which agencies have the highest employee-satisfaction scores. (The top three are the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Government Accountability Office and National Aeronautics and Space Administration.)

Most government-job searches begin at USAJobs.gov, which recently listed more than 31,000 jobs worldwide. The site lets you browse listings by agency, location or occupation, plus learn about special opportunities for veterans. You should also check the Web sites of agencies you’re targeting because not all agencies are required to list openings on USAJobs.gov. These include the Department of State, GAO and Federal Reserve. Job fairs are a good source of leads; scout fairs at www.govcentral.com/careers.

Corporate émigrés may find the federal hiring process arduous and baffling. Vacancies are described in government-ese. You may apply and hear nothing for months, then get an interview, then wait months more. Fortunately, efforts are under way at the Office of Personnel Management to revamp USAJobs.gov to emphasize plain English, provide timely notifications to applicants and fill positions within 80 days of the decision to hire.

Meanwhile, don’t abandon your corporate job-hunting skills, especially the art of making personal contacts. Use the Federal Yellow Book, published by Leadership Directories and available in most libraries, to find names, e-mail addresses and phone numbers for key personnel in every agency. Contact someone who can give you the skinny on working at the agency in the program area you’re interested in. “When I’m recruiting, I reach out to people who were referred to me or sent me a résumé, or whom I met at a conference,” says Kevi
n Mahoney, associate director of the Office of Personnel Management.

Don’t be too picky. Moving around within the government is easier than getting in. Vacancies that used to attract 10 to 20 applications get 100 or more these days, and agencies fill 90% of senior-executive positions from within. But experienced applicants might enter at a level with the potential to earn between $70,615 and $91,801, plus generous benefits.

Once hired, the challenge is adjusting to the culture. “It’s like going from New York to Tokyo,” says Michael Watkins, co-founder of Genesis Advisers, a leadership-development firm in Newton, Mass. You’ll have to contend with layers of bureaucracy, special interests and maybe the entire U.S. citizenry. But the heady sense of doing Uncle Sam’s work is invigorating. Says Harris: “Before, I’d work with a single attorney at a single law firm with a specific book of clients. Now I affect more important issues.” 

Life Enrichment Specialist; Sunrise at Fox Hill (Assisted Living Community)- Bethesda, Maryland

Interested? 

You can find out more by logging into your RamsRecruiting account. Make sure that your resume has been approved before you apply for this position. You can do so by contacting your Career Consultant or utilizing our walk-in hours:

 

http://www.students.vcu.edu/careers/resources/counseling.php#consultants

 

http://www.students.vcu.edu/careers/contact.php  Walk-in Hours (left hand side of the page)

 

Don’t have an account? 

It is easy to get one! Stop by the Career Center in the University Student Commons (across from the Chick-Fil-A) and request an account or email us at The University Career Center email account

Program Coordinator, Supervised Visitation Project; Vera Institute of Justice – Washington, DC

The Vera Institute of Justice is a private, non-profit organization
that combines expertise in research, demonstration projects, and
technical assistance to help leaders in government and civil society
improve the systems people rely on for justice and safety. As part of
its work to promote innovative practices that address violence against
women, the Institute is launching an initiative to enhance the capacity
of supervised visitation programs to address issues of domestic
violence.

Interested? 

You can find out more by logging into your RamsRecruiting
account. Make sure that your resume has been approved before you apply for this
position. You can do so by contacting your Career Consultant or utilizing our
walk-in hours:

 

http://www.students.vcu.edu/careers/resources/counseling.php#consultants

 

http://www.students.vcu.edu/careers/contact.php 
Walk-in Hours (left hand side of the page)

 

Don’t have an account? 

It is easy to get one! Stop by the Career
Center in the University
Student Commons
(across from the Chick-Fil-A) and request an account or email us at The University Career Center email account

Home Care Sales/Marketing Associate; Jewish Family Services

 Jewish Family Services seeks an experienced sales/marketing professional to market its home-care services to local health care providers and referral sources. The ideal candidate will be self-motivated, have a minimum of three years’ experience in home-health care sales, and a proven sales track record. Duties include cold calling,  follow-up, and event planning with referral sources, developing and maintaining a contact list, and managing a budget. JFS is an accredited health and social services agency, specializing in home-health care, counseling, adoption, and care management. Please submit resume with cover letter and salary history by January 4, 2010, to mailto:jobs@jfsrichmond.org 

Ever wondered why a CV and resume differ?

The CV Doctor Is Back

By Julie Miller Vick and Jennifer S. Furlong

CV’s and résumés are very different documents. However, a good CV or résumé always has the following:

• It is tailored to the type of job you are applying for. 

• It has consistent formatting, and its wording is clear and concise, with no spelling, grammar, or punctuation errors.

When turning a CV into a résumé, you should should be sensitive to a few things:

• Length: A CV often lists all or most of your academic achievements. A résumé geared to a nonacademic audience will generally not include long lists of honors and awards, or a lengthy education section.

• Language: Résumés are best written using bullet points, active verbs, and language that demonstrates your achievements.

• Numbers: Quantifying your achievements often helps in writing a strong résumé — “Raised $1,000 in funds for student group” or “Developed a procedure that increased lab efficiency by 15 percent.”

• Translation: A good résumé will help translate your academic experience to a nonacademic audience. Some people in the “real world” will not understand what it means to be a teaching assistant, a postdoc, or a research assistant. Show them. Rather than write, “taught history,” write “taught undergraduate courses on topics ranging from U.S. History to Europe in the 20th Century.” And avoid using jargon that is specific to your field.

• Audience: Who is the audience for your nonacademic résumé? The answer to that question should guide you as you describe the work that you’ve done. You wouldn’t want to use highly technical terms to describe your work if your audience is unlikely to understand them.

Both résumés and CV’s are documents that constantly evolve. The final versions we show here are the result of a dialogue between us and the two readers. They listened to our advice and suggestions, incorporated them into their revised documents, and made the final decisions as to what they felt highlighted their qualifications most effectively. We hope that readers find these documents, and our comments, helpful in preparing their own materials.

Julie Miller Vick is senior associate director of career services at the University of Pennsylvania, and Jennifer S. Furlong is associate director of graduate-student career development at Columbia University’s Center for Career Education. They are authors of “The Academic Job Search Handbook” (University of Pennsylvania Press). If you have questions for the Career Talk columnists, send them to careertalk@chronicle.com.

Source

Holiday Time the Right Time for Job Search?

As they sing (relentlessly it seems) in Jingle Bell Rock …. “What a bright time, it’s the right time, to rock the night away.”  That’s how most of us feel about December, jammed conveniently  between the long Thanksgiving Weekend on one side – and Christmas and New Year’s on the other.  Conventional wisdom tells us it’s not only a bright and right time, it’s also a very slow time at the office – and that goes double for the corner office.

 

But conventional wisdom would be wrong.  Or at least, it would be deceiving.  Why – because December is actually a pretty busy time for most companies and a particularly interesting time for the careers of managers and executives.  Since 12/31 is the last day of the fiscal year for most companies, it’s a time of budget-making and decision-making about strategy for the year ahead.  Even if your company is on a different fiscal year basis, it’s still the end of the calendar year and that usually means performance reviews and bonus deliberations.

 

And with all of that, frequently comes decisions about company leadership, which inevitably trickles down and across to executives and managers throughout the affected company.  It happened at GM, it’s happening at Bank of America and it’s happening right now at my company too.  Other companies will consider status changes at this time of year via merger, consolidation or acquisition (see GE’s deal with Comcast announced exactly one week after Thanksgiving on December 3.)

 

Here’s the point.  If you’re gainfully employed and focused on managing your career, don’t take your eye off the ball right now.  Within your company and at your primary competitors, opportunity may abound, but not if you’re asleep at the switch.  (In other words, this might not be the best time to arrive late or leave early or take overly long lunch breaks.)   And if you’re among the one in eight managers and execs who are currently unemployed, don’t shrug off the month of December because of a perceived lack of activity.  Granted, you won’t make any progress on a job search after December 22, but you’ve still got a good two weeks to buy an old friend a mug of grog or slip in for an informational meeting with a new contact.  And if you can’t get through before the holidays, keep calling and emailing because then you can hit the ground running on January 4. 


Source

Full-time Financial Representatives and Financial Rep Interns needed; Northwestern Mutual

Financial Representatives with Northwestern Mutual Financial Network
provide expert guidance and innovative solutions for the planning needs
of individuals and businesses in the areas of retirement planning,
insurance and investment services, estate planning, business planning,
education funding, and employee benefits. They strive to understand
their clients’ goals and visions in order to develop financial
solutions that put them on a path to success. These representatives are
in business for themselves — but they’re not alone. Supported by our
network of financial specialists, training programs and mentoring
opportunities, they have access to the resources, products and
assistance they need to help their clients and build their practices. 

Interested? 

You can find out more by logging into your RamsRecruiting
account. Make sure that your resume has been approved before you apply for this
position. You can do so by contacting your Career Consultant or utilizing our
walk-in hours:

 

http://www.students.vcu.edu/careers/resources/counseling.php#consultants

 

http://www.students.vcu.edu/careers/contact.php 
Walk-in Hours (left hand side of the page)

 

Don’t have an account? 

It is easy to get one! Stop by the Career
Center in the University
Student Commons
(across from the Chick-Fil-A) and request an account or email us at The University Career Center email account

Management Trainee; Enterprise Rent-A-Car – Starting comensation is $31,500/year with full benefits

Interested? 

You can find out more by logging into your RamsRecruiting
account. Make sure that your resume has been approved before you apply for this
position. You can do so by contacting your Career Consultant or utilizing our
walk-in hours:

 

http://www.students.vcu.edu/careers/resources/counseling.php#consultants

 

http://www.students.vcu.edu/careers/contact.php 
Walk-in Hours (left hand side of the page)

 

Don’t have an account? 

It is easy to get one! Stop by the Career
Center in the University
Student Commons
(across from the Chick-Fil-A) and request an account or email us at The University Career Center email account

Staff Support Position at the VCU Office of Admissions (temporary)

The Office of Undergraduate Admissions is seeking a temporary, hourly staff person to assist with application-related tasks and processes.  The position will offer 40 hours a week from January through May.

Interested? 

You can find out more by logging into your RamsRecruiting account. Make sure that your resume has been approved before you apply for this position. You can do so by contacting your Career Consultant or utilizing our walk-in hours:

 

http://www.students.vcu.edu/careers/resources/counseling.php#consultants

 

http://www.students.vcu.edu/careers/contact.php  Walk-in Hours (left hand side of the page)

 

Don’t have an account? 

It is easy to get one! Stop by the Career Center in the University Student Commons (across from the Chick-Fil-A) and request an account or email us at The University Career Center email account

Former Athletes- Interested in a Career in Recruiting? Check out these opportunities with TEKsystems!

TEKsystems is proud of our nationwide reputation as the industry leader in providing information technology and communications staffing and services. We’re proud of our accomplishments, proud of our continued growth, and proud of the fine standing we enjoy among our partners in the marketplace. 

But most of all, we’re proud of our people! 

Our Recruiting and Sales teams are at the core of our success. The TEKsystems family includes more than 2,000 internal employees working at 90 offices nationwide, and over 20,000 Technical Professionals working with clients around the country and throughout world. 

Due to our ongoing growth, TEKsystems is currently seeking career-oriented college graduates for opportunities as in-house Recruiters. Candidates need to want to work hard, learn on the job, help their team members and customers, and have fun.