Changes in Financial Aid (Part 1) – for Pre-Health Students

For Pre-Health Students:

From explorehealthcareers.org –

You have many things going for you with a future career in the health
sciences. One you may not be aware of involves changes in financial aid
designed to not only help you pay for your health sciences education,
but also to help you effectively manage any student loans you borrow to
pay for school.

Your Financial Aid Office is the best source of information on these
changes and should always be your first point of contact when you apply
for financial aid. Here are some recent changes you should be aware of:

Changes in How You Apply for Financial Aid

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is the key
document for anyone applying for federal financial aid. Recent changes
have simplified the form, making it easier to complete by allowing for
the transfer of IRS data onto the FAFSA, eliminating some questions for
low-income students, and making it easier for students who are married
or over 23 to complete the form.  See www.FAFSA.ed.gov for more details.

Where Your Student Loans Come From

One major change involves where you get your student loans.  Federal
Stafford Loans (both Subsidized and Unsubsidized), Parent PLUS and Grad
PLUS Loans, and Federal Consolidation Loans are now originated by the
federal government through their Direct Loan Program. Private lenders
such as banks and credit unions are no longer making federal loans.
First-time borrowers may find it easier to keep track of their borrowing
since any loans they take out in these programs will be with one
lender: the federal government.

Lower Interest Rates and Lower Fees

Interest rates on Subsidized Stafford Loans for undergraduate
students have been dropping over the past few years, helping to reduce
the cost of borrowing, and rates are changing again. The rate on new Subsidized Stafford Loans for undergraduates
during 2011-12 academic year will be fixed at 3.4%, down from 4.5% the
previous year.  In addition, the origination fee (taken as a percentage
of the loan) on all Federal Stafford Loans is currently only 1.0% for
loans borrowed on or after July 1, 2010, down from 1.5% the previous
year.

Repayment Help

The majority of borrowers from health sciences programs are able to
effectively manage their student loans when they graduate and move into
their careers. While no doubt due to responsible borrowing and effective
debt management and budgeting skills, it is also due to a variety of
programs designed to help all borrowers manage their loans when they
enter repayment and improvements in these programs:

·         Changes in online debt management tools for your Direct Loans

·         Increased repayment amounts in the National Health Service Corps (NHSC) Loan Repayment Program

·         Changes designed to improve access to the Primary Care Loans for eligible medical school borrowers

·         Upcoming changes in the new Income Based Repayment (IBR) plan designed to lower payments for eligible borrowers

See your Financial Aid Office for more information on these and other changes.

Private Loans

Students should always exhaust their eligibility for federal student
loans before applying for a private education loan. Federal loans have
more flexibility with options for repayment and postponing payments
(when needed) than private loans, plus opportunities for loan
forgiveness that do not apply to private loans.

There have been recent changes with private education loans that should help:

  • New requirements for private loan lenders to provide more
    information to borrowers about the terms and conditions of their loans
    through what are called Disclosure Statements.
  • New Consumer Financial Protection Bureau that has oversight of
    private education loans and that should help ensure borrowers are always
    in the know regarding how their private loans work.

While it is ultimately your responsibility to know how your financial
aid works, especially your student loans, you should take comfort in
knowing that you have help.

This article was written by Paul S. Garrard, President and
Founder of PGPresents, LLC; a 27 year veteran of student financial aid
and higher education.

U.S. Department of State English Language Fellow Program

For Foreign Language Students: 

2011-2012 English Language Fellow Program Project list. 

 
Please see the attached list of AY 2011-12 Projects for the U.S. Department of State English Language Fellow Program.  Full project descriptions will be available and posted on the website (elf.georgetown.edu) soon!
 
Please note that these are regular-cycle projects (Fall-Spring); off-cycle projects will be posted in April.
 
Most assignments are for 10 months.  Application deadline for priority consideration is March 1, 2011.  Positions are filled on a rolling basis.
 
APPLY NOW at http://elf.georgetown.edu/.
 
The U.S. State Department-funded English Language Fellow Program promotes English language learning around the world and fosters mutual understanding  between the people of the United States and those of other countries by placing highly qualified teachers in funded professional positions on projects initiated by U.S. Embassies in all regions of the world.
 
Qualifications:
US Citizenship; Master’s in TEFL/TESL, Applied Linguistics, or other fields directly relevant to the accepted projects (TEFL/TESL certification required); minimum 2 years of experience in teaching English to non-native speakers; overseas work experience preferred. Senior Fellows must have minimum of
four years of teacher training experience.
 
Benefits: 
$25,000 stipend for Fellows, $35,000 stipend for Senior Fellows. Living allowance covering the cost of reasonable, safe, and comfortable housing, food, utilities, and transportation. International round trip travel from Fellow’s residence to host country. Miscellaneous  allowance (shipping and pre-departure expense). Medical coverage up to $50,000 per illness or injury. Educational materials allowance and program activities allowance.
 
For more information, please refer to http://elf.georgetown.edu or contact elf@georgetown.edu or matulas@georgetown.edu.

AY 2011-2012 Projects English Language Fellow Program.pdf

Please Post and Distribute AY 2011-12 ELF Projects.pdf
 
 Suzanne L. Matula, Ph. D.
Academic Coordinator, Special Programs
Center for Language Education and Development (CLED)
Georgetown University
3605 ‘O’ Street, NW
Washington, DC 20007
 
Tel: (202) 687-5871
Email: matulas@georgetown.edu
Web site: http://cled.georgetown.edu/

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Career Fair


2011 Public Health Career Fair (http://jhsph.experience.com/stu/cf_details?fhnd=4450)

Details | Registered Organizations All Career Fairs

Career Fair Date:
March 4, 2011
(10:00AM – 3:00PM)

Location:
Gallery & Feinstone Hall (615 N. Wolfe St. Bldg.)

Overview:
The 27th Annual Public Health Career Fair is for undergraduate and
graduate students looking for full-time positions, internships,
consultancy and fellowship positions in the corporate, government and
non-profit sectors.

Full Description:
Sponsored by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Career
Services Office, the 27th Annual Public Health Career Fair provides a
convenient location for agency representatives from around the country
to meet with students, faculty, and alumni to discuss agency functions,
employment opportunities, consultancies, internships, and career
information for public health graduates and professionals.

***Click on the registered organizations for a full listing of employers that plan to be in attendance.!!!***

National Quality Forum – The Project Director, HIT Infrastructure Team

For Nursing and Health Administration Majors:

www.qualityforum.org

Applications

All applications to this job will be received offline.

 

Job Details

Job Title: 

The Project Director, HIT Infrastructure Team

Description: 

National Quality Forum (NQF) is a not-for-profit membership organization
conveniently located at Metro Center.  NQF is committed to improving
the quality of healthcare by setting priorities for healthcare quality
improvement and standards for practice and measurement. NQF is currently
seeking a Project Director, HIT Infrastructure to join our Health
Information Technology Department.

The Project Director,
HIT Infrastructure Team will be responsible for providing direction for
NQF’s healthcare information technology (HIT) infrastructure with
respect to measure submission and endorsement. Such infrastructure
should support the flow of information electronically through the care
delivery process to enable clinical decision support and automated
reporting of outcomes, enhancing transparency and performance
improvement. The Project Director, HIT Infrastructure Team will maintain
currency with and use of NQF and industry HIT to support the
development of electronic measures (Health Quality Measure Format) and
the Quality Data Model (QDM).  Responsibilities include: support
functions for measure developers in using the QDM to create or retool
measures and identification and implementation of process improvement
initiatives related to NQF’s HIT infrastructure; engaging in a variety
of communication activities — both internal and external to the
organization– to promote the mission of NQF or specified project(s);
serving as a subject matter expert for the Quality Data Model as it
relates to eMeasure development; and leading a small HIT Infrastructure
Team in developing tools and technical assistance for stakeholders (must
be willing to implement as well as manage).  Additional
responsibilities include: maintaining and updating the Quality Data
Model Coordinates with the HHS Office of the National Coordinator for
Health Information Technology (including on-site assistance); developing
and updating a strategic plan for the Quality Data Model, including
incorporation of HHS and other stakeholder comments; providing expert
advice on harmonizing the QDM specifications with clinical quality
measure e-specifications; providing expertise to the HIT Department with
respect to healthcare standards, specifically terminology and
information models as well as and terminology models, and coordination
of such models with other clinical areas (physical and occupational
therapy, speech/language pathology, home care, etc.).

Qualifications
include: health care professional, nursing degree; Health IT degree or
equivalent experience; experience with healthcare IT in an inpatient or
ambulatory environment, or with a software vendor, implementer or
consultant; clinical background and experience – 5 year minimum
(Nursing, Allied Health Professional, Physician Assistant, Advanced
Nurse Practitioner, or equivalent); HL7 balloting expertise Clinical
Document Architecture (CDA) expertise, certification preferred XML
expertise; background in healthcare terminology for quality measurement
required; strong analytic skills; understanding of coding models,
including ICD-10 preferred; outstanding oral and written skills;
excellent managerial and communication skills are essential. Ability to
work independently and collaboratively
  
National Quality Forum
offers competitive salaries and an outstanding benefits package which
includes health and life insurance, 401(k), transit reimbursement, and
on-site gym facilities. Please visit our online career center at

http://tbe.taleo.net/NA2/ats/careers/requisition.jsp?org=QUALITYFORUM&cws=1&rid=29

to submit your resume and cover letter.  Please visit our website at
www.qualityforum.org to learn more about National Quality Forum.  
EOE M/F/D/V The Project Director, HIT Infrastructure Team

Opportunity Type: 

Job

Contact: 
Andrew Sylvia

Status: 

Full-time

Preferred Method of Application: 

Through Employer Website

Is this a Work Study position? 

No

Job Locations: 
Washington, D.C.

Job Function: 

Health Services/Healthcare, Information Management/MIS, IT/Systems, Writing

Period of Employment: 

Post-Graduate

Compensation Type: 

Paid

Student’s Year of Classification: 

Graduate Students

Estimated Start Date: 

1/21/11

Estimated # of Openings: 

1

Application Qualifications: 

 There are no required qualifications for this position.

 The following qualifications are desired:

    Degree: 

    Master of Health Administration

    Major: 

    NURS – Nursing

    Student Status: 

    Recent Alumnus/a (w/RamsRecruiting)

    Work Authorization: 

    U.S. Citizen or U.S. National

Cover Letter Required: 

Yes

Writing Sample(s) Required: 

No

Other Document(s) Required: 

No

Application Method: 
Offline – via URL (http://tbe.taleo.net/NA2/ats/careers/requisition.jsp?org=QUALITYFORUM&cws=1&rid=29)

Additional Instructions: 

Please visit our online career center at

http://tbe.taleo.net/NA2/ats/careers/requisition.jsp?org=QUALITYFORUM&cws=1&rid=29

to submit your resume and cover letter.  Please visit our website at
www.qualityforum.org
to learn more about National Quality Forum.  
EOE M/F/D/V The Project Director, HIT Infrastructure Team

National Quality Forum – Research Analyst, Strategic Partnerships

For Nursing, Health Administration & Pre-Health Science:

Job Details

Job Title: 

Research Analyst, Strategic Partnerships

Description: 

The National Quality Forum (NQF), conveniently located at Metro Center,
is a nonprofit membership organization committed to improving the
quality of healthcare.   NQF is currently seeking a Research Analyst for
its Strategic Partnerships Department.

The Research Analyst,
Strategic Partnerships is responsible for providing support in the
execution of various projects within the department, including but not
limited to:  (1) constructing a national agenda for healthcare
performance measure development and endorsement; (2) the National
Priorities Partnership; (3) projects related to uses of healthcare
performance measurement information for public reporting, (4) projects
related to payment incentives, accreditation and certification,
workforce education, and systems improvement.  The Research Analyst will
participate in the organization of multistakeholder meetings that
relate to the aforementioned initiatives and will contribute to the
background analytics and convening follow-up, as directed by the project
manager.

Under the direction of the project manager, Research Analyst is also responsible for:
supporting
the execution of projects to accomplish strategic initiatives,
including but not limited to; developing agendas, briefing materials,
and other meeting documents as directed by the project manager;
performing literature reviews and data analyses;
planning and
preparing for meetings and calls, taking appropriate follow-up action;
and editing reports and other written products as applicable.  In
addition the Research Analyst will work collaboratively within and
across NQF departments.

Qualifications include a Bachelor’s
degree in health policy or a related field; 1-3 years of experience in
health quality; demonstrated success in project support or
management.  Preferred qualifications include: knowledge of health care
performance measurement; knowledge of health care financing and delivery –
including performance-based payment models; prior experience with
quality improvement initiatives in a clinical setting and/or a health
plan; and clinical experience.

The successful candidate will have
analytical thinking capability; be a self-starter with action
orientation; have the ability to work collegially within teams; have
strong organizational and project management skills; possess keen
attention to precision and detail; be able to manage multiple competing
priorities; demonstrate a clear and concise writing style; be proficient
in MS Office, Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint.  Familiarity with
Visio, Project, and SharePoint preferred.

The National Quality
Forum offers competitive salaries and an outstanding benefits package
which includes health and life insurance, flexible spending accounts, a
professional development program, 401(k), transit reimbursement, and
free on-site gym facilities. Please visit the NQF Career Center at
http://tbe.taleo.net/NA2/ats/careers/requisition.jsp?org=QUALITYFORUM&cws=1&rid=16
to submit your resume and cover letter. Please visit our website at
www.qualityforum.org to learn more about National Quality Forum.  
EOE M/F/D/V

Opportunity Type: 

Job

Contact: 
Andrew Sylvia

Status: 

Full-time

Preferred Method of Application: 

Through Employer Website

Is this a Work Study position? 

No

Job Locations: 
Washington, D.C.; Washington , D.C.

Job Function: 

Analyst, Research

Period of Employment: 

Post-Graduate

Compensation Type: 

Paid

Student’s Year of Classification: 

Graduate Students

Estimated Start Date: 

1/03/11

Estimated # of Openings: 

1

Application Qualifications: 
 The following qualifications are required:

    Resume Critique Status: 

    Yes, resume approved.

 The following qualifications are desired:

    Degree: 

    Bachelor of Social Work, Master of Public Health, Master of Public Policy

    Major: 

    HS – Public Policy & Administration, NURS – Nursing, NURS- School of
    Nursing, SAHP- Health Administration, UC – Pre-Health Sciences

    Student Status: 

    Recent Alumnus/a (w/RamsRecruiting)

    Work Authorization: 

    U.S. Citizen or U.S. National

Cover Letter Required: 

Yes

Writing Sample(s) Required: 

No

Other Document(s) Required: 

No

Etiquette Tip of the Week: The Boss

Be loyal to your boss. 
Speak well of your superior to others and support his or her initiatives.  Your
job is not only to advance your own career, but also to make your superior look
good. 
 
Seek out supervisors and
mentors who are ethical, that you will be proud to support. Never do anything
illegal or unethical for your superior, because you will be held
accountable.


Culture and Manners Institute at http://www.cultureandmanners.com/

Top 10 Job Hunting Tips

Top 10 Job Hunting Tips of 2010 – Lindsay Pollak

I absolutely love end of year lists, and swooned when I found Time.com’s list of The Top 10 of Everything of 2010.

Although Time’s list of lists is pretty comprehensive, ranging from
apologies to new species to Twitter moments, I wanted to add my own top
10 list — top 10 tips for job seekers. Here are the tips that readers
found most helpful this year.

1. Ask for honest feedback. Recruit a trusted relative, career
services staff member, professor or friend to assess you honestly as a
job seeker. Ask the person to list your best qualities and most
impressive accomplishments. On the flip side, ask for constructive
feedback on your weaknesses. Find out if the things you’re most
concerned about — lack of experience, a less-than-desirable GPA,
shyness, etc. — are legitimate concerns or if you’re obsessing over
nothing. If your fears are unfounded, let them go once and for all!

2. Don’t be turned off by the terms “internship” or “part-time.” This tip came from Lauren Porat, co-founder of UrbanInterns.com.
In a difficult job market, sometimes you need to be flexible and
“settle” for a less-than-perfect opportunity, such as a non-full-time
job. According to Lauren, many people have developed incredible careers
by serving multiple part-time clients. Also, starting out this way may
allow you to get your foot in the door with some very cool, interesting
startup companies.

3. Overprepare. Think about your confidence level when you walk into
a test for which you’ve studied really thoroughly versus how you feel
walking into a test for which you’ve skimmed your notes for ten minutes
the night before. Most people don’t realize that a job hunt is
something you can study for. Before attending a job fair, spend an hour
or two on the websites of companies that will have booths. Before a
job interview, spend an hour reading the organization’s website
(especially the mission statement, recruiting pages and recent press
releases) and study the LinkedIn profiles of the people who will be
interviewing you. Read e-newsletters and blogs from your industry to
keep up with current events that might be discussed at a networking
event. The more preparation you do, the more confident you’ll feel when
you interact with recruiters and other professionals you’ll encounter
during your job search.

4. Do not ask to “pick someone’s brain.” Okay this one is more about
how not to ask me in particular for advice on your job hunt (or
anything for that matter!). Some people don’t mind this phrase, but I
definitely do. Why? First of all, I think it sounds kind of gross
(think about it). Second of all, it is very one-sided: if you are
picking my brain, what’s in this conversation for me? It feels as if
I’ll be left brainless afterwards. My advice is to always request
advice in a way that makes the ask-ee feel respected and like he or she
will leave the conversation with something, too.

5. Clean up your online image. According to a recent Microsoft survey,
85 percent of HR professionals responding said that positive online
reputation influences their hiring decisions, and 70 percent said they
have rejected candidates based on information they found online. Make no
mistake about it: your online image will affect your job search and
your career. If you haven’t already, set up strict privacy settings on
all social networks (often, including on Facebook, the default setting
is for all of your information to be public, so check every setting!),
take down any inappropriate pictures or content, set up a 100 percent
professional profile on LinkedIn and Google, and think twice before
posting any new content on Facebook, Twitter or a blog. In many
recruiters’ minds, you are what you post.

6. Spell recruiters’ and hiring managers’ names correctly. Of the
emails I received responding to a part-time position I posted this
year, about half (!) spelled my name wrong. To me, that was an instant
sign that a candidate lacked attention to detail. None of these people
were called for an interview.

7. Don’t be too early for a job interview. While we’ve all heard the
advice never, ever to arrive late to a job interview, employers are
equally peeved when you arrive too early. By all means get to the
company’s building or parking lot as early as you’d like, but don’t
enter the actual office any more than 15 minutes before your scheduled
interview time.

8. Focus on what you can do for your employer, not the other way around.
In cover letters, email messages, conversations with recruiters, salary
negotiations, etc., make sure you frame your value in terms of what
you can offer, not what you need. Recruiters roll their eyes at cover
letters that begin with, “I would like to find a position in which I can
learn.” Likewise, negotiations fail when you ask for more money
because, “I need it.” You’ll have a better chance of getting what you
want when you focus your argument on how it will benefit the company in
terms of increased sales, more productivity or lower costs. Always ask
yourself, “What’s in it for them?”

9. Never call to say “Just following up.” There is a fine line
between appropriate persistence and pointless pestering. It is
absolutely fine to call or email a recruiter to say thank you for a
company information session, to ask a few questions or to mention that
you’ll be attending another event they are hosting. But “Just calling
to follow up!” doesn’t add much to your candidacy. If you find yourself
calling multiple times with no response, you may have to accept the
fact that, as the famous dating book title says, this particular
employer is just not that into you.

10. It’s never too late to say thank you. I’ve had a lot of students
ask me “how late is too late to send a thank you note?” and I truly
believe that a thank you is always warranted and always appreciated,
even if it comes much later than expected. If you do find yourself
sending a belated thank you, simply say something like, “I truly
apologize for the delay in thanking you…” or “This note is late but I
am deeply grateful…” It’s better to feel a bit awkward and do the right
thing than to hope the person doesn’t notice that you never showed
your gratitude.

What other job hunting tips were most helpful to you in 2010? Please share!

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Unsure how to market your “entry-level” “newly graduated” skill set?

**TIP**:  Often new grads are unaware of how to market their newly fine-tuned skills to potential employers.  Yes, you may not have the “real-world” experience, but you have plenty of skills and abilities that those who have been out of school for a while probably don’t have. 

But don’t take my word for it, check out this great article and interview aimed at showcasing how Gen Yers (aka Millennials) are staking their claim on in the business world. 

What is the “Gen Y Way” at Work?

For this week’s post, I had the pleasure of conducting a Q&A session with Jenny Floren, founder and CEO of Experience.com and author of The Innovation Generation: The Gen Y Way: How New Thinking Can Reclaim the American Dream.

Here is what Jenny had to say about Gen Y and how they approach their job searches and careers:

1. What do you feel Gen Y job seekers have to offer that older (more experienced) candidates don’t?

Gen Y has been brought up using the Internet, watching live, 24/7
news, expecting instant communication and emerging as the world’s first
generation of “digital natives.”  Today’s global economy brings new
challenges and new rules; it truly is a new world–and Gen Y speaks the
native tongue fluently.  Their unique perspective and new thinking -also
known as the “Gen Y Way” – brings a new view on a more socially
conscious, global world.

2. You mention in your book that Gen Ys have a ‘why not?’ attitude.  What do you mean by this and how is it an asset?

Think about it this way – in your own working environment have you
learned more from the folks who have taken your direction as law or
those who’ve stepped up to the plate and asked “why”?

In my opinion, an office full of robotic employees can only get you
so far.  Gen Y asks questions.  They’re inquisitive and it’s been
interesting to see some media thought leadership that’s condoned this
quality.

When Gen Y questions the status quo, it’s because they’re looking at
the situation through a different lens, and what they see doesn’t add
up.  They see that the old ways don’t work–and they can’t help but
question why we’d want to continue down the wrong path.  This type of
questioning shouldn’t be chastised–it should be celebrated and rewarded!

3. What are employers’ biggest misconceptions about Gen Y?

“‘Generation Whine’ is entitled and needy.”  For the past 15 years,
I’ve been able to observe this remarkable group.  What Gen Y really is,
is the most misunderstood generation in history.  This group is bringing
new perspectives, new values and new thinking to the table – and this
is exactly what we need to solve the challenges facing our world today.

They question old thinking and assumptions, and the reality is (as
mentioned above) some people don’t like having their feathers ruffled.
Gen Y also looks for collaborative methods to get the job done, which
can differ from other generations’ beliefs that it’s a one (wo)man show.

At the end of the day, they’re less focused on financial endeavors
and more so on creating a new set of life experiences and a balanced
living.  Gen Y isn’t whiny; what they are is in constant pursuit of new
opportunities to learn and grow.

4. What is Gen Y’s impact on the workforce (positive or negative)?

I’m obviously going to say positive, but don’t take my word for it! 
Here in Massachusetts, efforts to attract and retain young, educated
talent are a high priority.  The Massachusetts Innovation &
Technology Exchange (MITX) launched a “Recruit and Retain” initiative to
promote the growing new-media industry in the state, and to counter the
misconception that all “cool” innovation is happening on the West
Coast.

Today, many mainstream companies are attempting to step up the
marketing of New England to attract the up-and-coming talent that is so
critically important for innovation and growth.  This effort by MITX and
New England companies is indicative of the fact that the world is
beginning to place a higher value on the Innovation Generation’s fresh
thinking.

One need look no further than President Barack Obama’s utilization of
social, collaborative technology in his campaign in order to assess the
value of this new type of thinking.

Do you agree with Jenny’s assessment of Gen Y? How do you feel about
being a member of this generation or working with Gen Ys? Please share
your thoughts in the comments!

Old Dominion Home Health Services – PT & OT

For Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Students: 

We are Old Dominion Home Health Services, a Better Business Bureau accredited business with an A+ rating. We are based out of Richmond, but we have clients all over the state. With ODHHS, your grads can expect a full time or part time (whichever they desire) position that will require them to service clients in the clients’ homes. The hours would be a little more flexible than those in a traditional PT facility, and candidates would be able to start immediately.
If you have any students that have already gotten their Physical Therapy license in VA, please direct them to our website for more information about the company, www.ODHHS.org and get them to fax their resumes to 804-745-5526, or call 804-745-5133 to set up an interview. Thank you so much!


Shana Smith, RN
Old Dominion Home Health Services
8014 Midlothian Tnpk, Suite 312
Richmond, VA 23235
Phone 804-745-5133
Fax     804-745-5526
www.ODHHS.org

Looking for World Studies Internship Opportunities?

World Studies Majors:

Check out some great companies and organizations offering great non-profit, cultural or social justice volunteer and internship opportunities:

Operation Blessing International http://community.ob.org/site/PageServer
Organization that partners with hundreds of other humanitarian and faith-based groups
around the world. It is through these partnerships that OBI can
effectively provide relief in real time to those who are suffering.

Village Volunteers: http://www.villagevolunteers.org/
Village Volunteers is dedicated to assisting village communities in
their quest to achieve a healthy, sustainable life. By exploring ways to
stimulate economic development, and always working in partnership with
local villages, we are working to help insure sustainable
self-sufficiency in Kenya, Ghana, India, or Nepal

Cultural Survival: http://www.culturalsurvival.org/
Partnering with Indigenous Peoples to Defend their Lands, Languages and Cultures

Perception International:
http://perceptionintl.org/
Perception International is dedicated to the
concept that, just as biodiversity is necessary for the survival of the
environment, different ways of perceiving reality are essential for the
survival of the human species and, in turn, other species. We call this
perceptual diversity.

Cafe 1040: http://cafe1040.com/index.php
Café 1040 is a 3-month mentoring program inside the 10/40 Window.
Through this intense program abroad, you will be deeply immersed into
the culture, experiencing what day-to-day ministry overseas could look
like for you. While living in a closed country, you will become a
confident learner of language, culture, history, religion, and
technology.

WWF Volunteering and Scholarships:  http://wwf.panda.org/how_you_can_help/volunteer/

WWF’s mission is to stop the degradation of our planet’s natural
environment, and build a future in which humans live in harmony with
nature.

International Relief & Development: http://www.ird.org/
IRD’s mission is to reduce the suffering of the world’s most
vulnerable groups and provide tools and resources needed to increase
their self-sufficiency.

Academy for Educational Development:  http://www.aed.org
AED is a nonprofit organization working globally to create enduring
solutions to critical problems in health, education, social and economic
development.  Collaborating with partners throughout the world, AED
develops and implements ideas that change lives through more than 300
programs in all 50 U.S. states and more than 150 countries

Questions, contact Sara at smkohout@vcu.edu