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November 14, 2016

The Class of 72’s David Lorber: Just say ‘yes’ – to a nontraditional career path

David Lorber, M’72

“Most physicians practice medicine,” says David Lorber, M’72. “But it doesn’t mean you can’t do other things.”

David Lorber, M’72, rarely says no – it’s a trait that has worked out well for him. It’s led him into a career he never planned, but one which has been extremely rewarding, he says.

Lorber visited the MCV Campus this month to share stories with medical students about his nontraditional career that jumped from academia to a busy practice to industry … and almost to the South Pole. “Most physicians practice medicine,” he notes, “but it doesn’t mean you can’t do other things.”

After completing a fellowship at the University of Arizona, he first assumed he’d have a future in academia. But that wasn’t as fulfilling as he hoped, so he ended up in Albuquerque, New Mexico, becoming the state’s fourth pulmonary critical care physician. Despite a grueling schedule, Lorber kept doing more. “I volunteered for everything I could,” he recalls. “Whatever we needed, I always raised my hand.

“My objective was to learn everything I could about the business of health care and to be able to provide value.”

On the side, he started a consulting firm, worked in an emergency and urgent care department and began exploring options for a post-clinical career. Though medicine was rewarding, he says, after two decades, he was burned out on 100-hour work weeks and started looking for something else.

He didn’t have to look long, as all the extra knowledge he’d gleaned paid off in an understanding of all facets of the health care industry.

David Lorber, M’72

Lorber returned to the MCV Campus in November to talk with students about alternative careers in medicine.

A friend at Blue Cross/Blue Shield pointed him towards a job there; he ended up as medical director of Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico, working in utilization management, disease management, provider relations, oversight of pharmacy and credentialing. He also served as medical director for the Indian Health Service Contract Health Services, managed by BCBS. After that, he joined the small company, PCS Health Systems, which eventually transformed into CVS Caremark, where Lorber became a vice president. When he left that job, he was snapped up by Walgreens. “I felt like you can impact the way health care is delivered in the U.S. more in industry than from the clinical side.”

Lorber is rarely content with just one job, and though he calls himself retired, he still works as consultant, entrepreneur, marketer and clinician. One of his side jobs he still loves is working as a consulting physician for National Geographic’s Lindblad Expeditions adventure cruise line.

As the company has grown, he’s become, in effect, the company’s chief medical officer, overseeing about 50 physicians who travel on Lindblad’s ships to remote corners of the earth.

“It can be gut-wrenching when you have something that in an emergency department would be a no-brainer and easy to do, but can become a catastrophe because of where you are,” he says. On a cruise to Antarctica, he once had to treat a patient with a bowel obstruction when the nearest hospital was days away. In Norway, he jumped in to treat a woman with an undiagnosed ectopic pregnancy; the nearest airstrip was on a small island 10 hours away. The patient survived, was treated on the mainland and returned to the ship several days later.

With Lindblad, Lorber has traveled to about 40 countries on all seven continents, allowing him to indulge his passion for photography (check out some of his travel photos below that appeared in the latest issue of the school’s 12th & Marshall magazine).

Lorber continues his routine of learning new skills and keeping an eye out for his next adventure. “You can’t have a five-year plan,” he muses. “You’ve got to be open to new things.”

Still, he says, his career hasn’t been totally random. It’s been about being prepared to be in the right place at the right time. “I really do believe you make your own luck.”

His advice for medical students?

“It’s about relationship building. While you’re in practice, get on committees, get involved politically and get involved any way you can. You’ve got to develop people skills, public speaking skills and the ability to negotiate.

“And learn everything you can. You never know when it’ll come in handy or may spark your interest.”

Always open to opportunities, David Lorber, M’72, said ‘yes’ to National Geographic’s Lindblad Expeditions adventure cruise line. As a result, he’s traveled to about 40 countries on all seven continents. It’s allowed him to indulge his passion for photography, like this shot that was taken in Montenegro. Click the images below for expanded views.

By Lisa Crutchfield

Virginia Commonwealth University
VCU Medical Center
School of Medicine
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Updated: 04/29/2016