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School of Medicine discoveries

October 26, 2017

Pediatric inhaler under development by Dr. Bruce Rubin and collaborators named Prix Galien laureate

Bruce K. Rubin, M.D. (second from left), physician-in-chief the Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, with his Protec’Som collaborators at the Prix Galien awards ceremony in New York City.

Bruce K. Rubin, M.D. (second from left), physician-in-chief the Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, with his Protec’Som collaborators at the Prix Galien awards ceremony in New York City.

A pediatric inhaler add-on device currently under development has received international honors by the Prix Galien Foundation and is now headed for review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency.

The invention, developed by the Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU and the French company Protec’Som, took MedStartUp honors in the category of Best Collaboration with Academia Leading to a Breakthrough Solution. The ceremony was held on Oct. 26, 2017, at The Museum of Natural History in New York City.

The CHoR research team was led by pediatric pulmonary expert Bruce K. Rubin, M.Engr., M.D., M.B.A., who is chair of pediatrics and CHoR’s physician-in-chief. A trained engineer and aerosol scientist, Rubin has collaborated with Protec’Som on the inhaler for the past six years.

“Back in 2011, we started discussions on developing a pediatric inhaler platform that would be able to tell when a patient was using their puffer correctly and inhaling most of the medication, and would train them to use it better with each use,” says Rubin, who has published more than 300 research papers and chapters and holds seven patents. He is the Jessie Ball duPont Distinguished Professor in Pediatrics and a holds a secondary appointment in VCU’s School of Engineering.

“We are proud to see Dr. Rubin and his collaborators honored with this impressive recognition,” says Peter Buckley, M.D., dean of the School of Medicine. “Dr. Rubin applies his dedication and ingenuity to improving children’s lives – and this technology has the potential to do that very thing.”

Once approved by the FDA and EMA, initial clinical studies in patients will be conducted at CHoR.

The Prix Galien Awards promote significant advances in pharmaceutical research. Each year, a jury of clinicians, toxicologists, pharmacologists and pharmacists select the most important drugs introduced into the public market as well as the achievements of the best research team in the pharmaceutical field.

By Erin Lucero

Virginia Commonwealth University
VCU Medical Center
School of Medicine
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Updated: 04/29/2016