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29
2016

The lure of the track

The Class of 95’s John M. “J.” Salmon IVThe Class of 95’s John M. “J.” Salmon IV says a love of cars drive him and his dad into racing. His father, John M. Salmon III, DDS, is a 1965 graduate of the dental school.

Years ago, John M. “J.” Salmon IV, M’95, and his father John Salmon III, DDS’65, always talked about building a car together. It seemed a natural thing for a father known as “the fix everything guy” and his young son to set their sights on, but they never got around to it when J. was little.

Today, after finally building not one, but two cars with his father, J. Salmon has moved into the driver’s seat. Each year, he races sports cars at the Petit Le Mans in Braselton, Georgia, though he’s quick to point out that he’s not a professional. His job is to warm up the crowd, so to speak.

“It’s like going to see the Blue Angels at the air show in Virginia Beach,” J. Salmon says. “They’ll be lots of airplanes and activities before they appear. That’s what I do as part of the support race team at the Petit Le Mans. It gives people something to watch and serves as a stepping stone for young drivers.”

The Petit Le Mans is an annual sports car endurance race. Now in its 19th year, the event covers 1,000 miles or 10 hours of racing, whichever comes first, and features 41 entries across four classes of the International Motor Sports Association WeatherTech Championship competition.

Salmon’s event, the Mazda Prototype Lites series, gives him the opportunity to drive at speeds topping 140 mph in a world-class environment where he’s happy to finish within one second of the pack.

“I’m very happy if I’m not dead last,” he laughs. 2016 marks his third year of support driving at the Petit Le Mans.

The Class of 95’s John M. “J.” Salmon IV“Racing is so fast. It’s a blend of science and art. A lot of physicians are drawn to that.”

How it all started
About an hour from the Salmons’ homes in Lynchburg, Virginia, is one of the country’s top six road courses, the Virginia International Raceway. So it’s not surprising that their love of cars drove them into racing.

“It just sort of steamrolled,” J. Salmon says. “It took Dad and me about three or four years to finish our first car and while we were doing that, we’d spend time at the track. We’d go to the track like others went golfing. Most people don’t have a facility as nice as VIR so close to them. That helped contribute to my delinquency!”

A VIR racer himself, the elder Salmon tries to keep his speed these days under 125 mph. With a recent knee replacement surgery under his belt, he’s careful not to overdo. A trip back to the track during recuperation helped him gauge his abilities.

“The knee is in good shape, but I wanted to see how it performed at the track,” he says. “The only real pressure I have to use is on the brakes, that’s why I wanted to go see how it worked.”

Problem solving
Working with engines, suspensions and timing belts is a lot like problem solving in the health care field, explains J. Salmon who practices as a pathologist.

“Many times Dad and I would be working on a car trying to make it faster. We’d upgrade things if necessary. And yes, we blew up an engine. But we figured it out. Problem solving stems from medicine. In school, you’d see a problem and decide how to approach it. You come up with your own solutions. Racing is really immersive. It’s complex, challenging and a blend of science and art. A lot of physicians are drawn to that.”

But as drawn as he is to racing at the Petit Le Mans, J. Salmon is equally happy racing here in Virginia.

“I enjoy it more at the local track with friends,” he says. “I get to go home at night and be with my family.”

By Nan Johnson

08
2016

Door Opens Wide for Biostatistician

You might not picture a biostatistician on the front lines of saving lives. But Maureen McBride, PhD’95 (BIOS), has parlayed her training into a high-powered career at UNOS, the United Network for Organ Sharing, the nation’s transplant network.

Maureen McBride, PhD’95 (BIOS)

Maureen McBride, PhD’95 (BIOS), says she’s “privileged to be in a position where I feel like the work I do helps patients every single day.”

As chief contract operations officer, McBride is part of a six-person C-suite at UNOS, a private nonprofit organization that operates the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network under contract with the federal government. They are tasked with operating the 24-hour computerized organ sharing system that matches donated organs to patients registered on the national organ transplant waiting list. The organization also seeks to increase understanding of the transplant system through education and improve transplant success rates through research and policy. It’s just a stone’s throw from VCU’s MCV Campus.

Her job is an important – and busy – one. “One of my primary responsibilities is to work with our partners in the transplant community and our funders at HRSA [the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Health Resources and Services Administration],” says McBride. “We make sure everybody’s on the same page with the different projects we have going on.” In addition to contract operations, she oversees three departments at UNOS: member quality, policy and the 24/7 organ placement division.

As she was finishing her doctorate, McBride heard about the opportunity for a senior biostatistician at UNOS. Its mission lured her away from thoughts of joining the pharmaceutical industry, a career path that interested many classmates. “It was a very different kind of opportunity. I knew I’d enjoy the direct connection with people in the field. I knew I’d have opportunity to work with people on national policy-making committees, to give presentations, write manuscripts and do collaborative research.”

In 2006, McBride became director of research, providing expertise in research, analysis and performance measurement conducted by UNOS staff. In 2014, she was promoted to her current position.

She’s pleased to help advance organ availability and transplantation through education, technology and policy development.

“I started as biostatistician involved in research and data, but now my scope has broadened to include policy development, performance improvement and compliance. Our organization is growing, medicine is evolving, and with a foundational education, you can go many different directions,” she says.
“The depth of her knowledge about how UNOS and transplantation work is amazing,” says Brian Shepard, CEO of UNOS. “Whenever I’m trying to understand something that nobody else seems to understand, I go to Maureen.”

It’s a time of growth at UNOS. The field of transplantation is expanding rapidly, with transplants in the U.S. up 6 percent last year and trending toward a 10 percent uptick this year. “I feel privileged to be in a position where I feel like the work I do helps patients every single day,” McBride notes.

McBride appreciates the long-standing relationship between VCU and UNOS. Noted transplant surgeons H.M. Lee, M.D., and David Hume, M.D., helped push the passing of the National Organ Transplant Act that founded the organization now known as UNOS. VCU is also a source of interns and hires for UNOS.

McBride’s top priority remains focusing on the lifesaving mission of UNOS. “There are currently 120,000 people on the waiting list,” she says. “But we’re only going to do about 30,000 transplants this year. Demand always far exceeds the supply.” She encourages everyone to make their wishes regarding organ donation known to their loved ones.

By Lisa Crutchfield

29
2016

“Nothing is more addicting than the thrill of discovery” Study abroad invigorates professor, students

Premed student Rosellen Provost

Premed student Rosellen Provost traveled to Italy with four fellow honors students for a three-week course that’s convinced her to pursue a career in medicine.

The little boy looked apprehensive as the male nurse approached to tend to his broken arm.

“You aren’t going to cry in front of all these girls are you?” he asked, smiling reassuringly. With a renewed sense of bravery, the child replied with an emphatic, “No!”

Standing nearby in the Italian emergency room, Rosellen Provost and her premed classmates smiled, too, as they watched a new friendship unfold before them.

“I always thought I might want to go into medicine, but after this experience, I have no doubt,” she said. “This is fueling me.”

Rosellen, a sophomore, was one of five undergraduate students from VCU’s Honors College to travel to Italy for three weeks this summer to explore the importance of research and learn what medical science looks like outside the United States. The trip was led by Antonio Abbate, M.D., Ph.D. H’07, who holds the James C. Roberts, Esquire Professor in Cardiology in the VCU School of Medicine and serves as associate chair for research in the Department of Internal Medicine.

“It was fantastic,” Abbate said. “The kids had the joy of discovering, researching and caring for patients.”

The trip was part of Abbate’s brainchild: Discover Medicine in Italy, which included two three-credit courses, Introduction to Translational Research and Introduction to Medical Semiotics. Abbate, a native of Italy and a UCBM graduate, taught both courses. His wife, Vera Abbate, Ph.D., instructor in the School of World Studies, served as course director, and Salvatore Carbone, instructor of medicine, assisted Abbate with the program and classes.

The students were paired with five Italian medical students and shadowed physicians. They took day trips to hospitals in Rome and observed molecular biology experiments.

Antonio Abbate, M.D., Ph.D. H’07

A native of Fondi, Italy, Cardiology’s Antonio Abbate, M.D., Ph.D., returned this summer to lead Discover Medicine in Italy. The course invigorated Abbate along with the Italian and VCU students he was teaching.

They also spent time in the lab and had to come up with their own concepts for future research projects. Rosellen’s project focused on a clinical trial for a vaccine that stops heroine from being synthesized and going to the brain, thus making a drug user immune to a physical high. Others explored new devices and dementia treatments.

Abbate was impressed with all the students’ work, and said, “their excitement for discovery was contagious.”

Even Abbate got recharged. His own love for research got its start when he was a medical student in Italy. As the years passed and administrative duties grew, he could feel the burn out coming. He wasn’t sure he wanted to encourage young students into the field. Then he read the book, “The Vanishing Physician Scientist,” and found a new perspective.

“As busy as we can be, I think sometimes we forget how beautiful research work is,” Abbate said. “This trip gave me time to reflect and to really appreciate what we do. Spending time with the students and sharing with them my passion, seeing their eyes light up, reinvigorated me. Nothing is more addicting than the thrill of discovery.”

Abbate got the idea to organize the study abroad opportunity after the University of Rome invited him on campus as a visiting professor last year. He said he would only accept if he could get something out of it that would be of value to VCU students.

He contacted the Honors College because he wanted to reach out to premed students. Those interested attended an orientation, filled out an application and secured their passports. The college pitched in with the finances, offering each student $2,500 toward the cost of the trip.

“To get a global perspective on healthcare is an enriching experience,” said Jacqueline Smith-Mason, Ph.D., associate dean of the Honors College. “Study abroad can be life-changing.”

During their time in Italy, students got a taste of what universal health care is like. They saw how medicine – from procedures to patient interaction – differ abroad. They also visited Fondi, where Abbate grew up, Pompeii and Sperlonga.

“What a beautiful country,” Rosellen said. “But what I loved most was the theme of service there. They live to serve other people. That’s exactly what I want to do.”

By Janet Showalter

21
2016

Kelley Dodson named first female president of the Virginia Society of Otolaryngology

I think my presidency definitely reflects the change in traditionally male dominated surgical specialties to now being more representative and inclusive of women as a whole.

“I think my presidency definitely reflects the change in traditionally male dominated surgical specialties to now being more representative and inclusive of women as a whole.”

Housestaff alumna and School of Medicine faculty member Kelley M. Dodson, M.D., was installed as president of the Virginia Society of Otolaryngology on June 4. She is the first female president in the society’s nearly 100-year history.

It’s a milestone that Dodson says has special meaning for her.

“I think my presidency definitely reflects the change in traditionally male dominated surgical specialties to now being more representative and inclusive of women as a whole.”

Dodson has been involved with the society for a half dozen years. She served as president-elect last year and before that as vice president.

Through her service, she says, “I have gained significant insight especially into legislative issues facing the commonwealth of Virginia, as we have been very active in the legislative process on issues affecting our specialty.”

Kelley M. Dodson, M.D.

Kelley Dodson, M.D.

The Virginia Society of Otolaryngology was chartered in 1920. It provides continuing medical education for its members and addresses political and regulatory challenges affecting practice issues. Each spring, the society holds an annual meeting, which was held this year in McLean, Va.

Dodson has a clinical interest in pediatric otolaryngology as well as in congenital and genetic hearing loss. On the research front, she is interested in language and speech outcomes in children with hearing loss and has been involved with genetic studies of tinnitus and different forms of hearing loss. She also studies pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis and the mask microbiome in cystic fibrosis.

After completing her residency in the Department of Otolaryngology on VCU’s MCV Campus, Dodson joined the medical school’s faculty in 2005. She is now director of the department’s residency program.

By Erin Lucero
Event photography by Susan McConnell, Virginia Society of Otolaryngology

18
2016

Father Figure: Neurosurgery residents pay homage to Harry Young

Harold F. Young, M.D.

This year, the usually low-key Resident Research Day Conference in Neurosurgery turned into a three day celebration of Harry Young, M.D. It drew more than 200 people, some of whom traveled across country to honor him.

Mike Chen, M.D., H’06, PhD’07 (ANAT), can’t recall a time when he worked harder or with more intensity than as a neurosurgery resident under Harold F. Young, M.D.

“The training was brutal,” he said. “As a resident at that time, you could work 120 hours a week. But there was no resentment. Dr. Young was preparing you to be the best under the most adverse circumstances. He was the most influential teacher of my life.”

Chen, who completed his residency in 2007 and now serves as associate professor at City of Hope in California, returned to Richmond in June. He traveled more than 2,000 miles to honor Young during the Resident Research Day Conference.

“I wasn’t going to miss it,” Chen said. “I owe him my career. He has the deepest passion for the profession, especially teaching it. He treated everyone with respect. He treated everyone like family.”

Usually a small, one-day event in which residents present their papers, organizers expanded it into three days this year to honor Young, who last year stepped down after 30 years as chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery. He remains on faculty as professor of neurosurgery.

“It can be hard to motivate people to come back for an event, but we had an amazing response,” said R. Scott Graham, M’92, H’98, director of the residency program. He has worked with Young since 1992. “He’s a father figure to so many of us. He instilled that sense of responsibility in everything you do.”

Harold F. Young, M.D.

Last year, Young stepped down after 30 years as chairman of the department. He remains on faculty as professor of neurosurgery.

About 225 people traveled from near and far to pay homage to their mentor. In year’s past, the conference has drawn about 50.

The alumni were eager to share stories and make a special presentation in Young’s honor. On day three of the conference, Young gave his presentation on preparing trainees for independent practice.

“I’m not sure we’ll ever see his like again,” said John Ward, M.D., neurosurgery professor. “He was able to create a bond with patients that was enviable.”

Ward was one of Young’s first residents, arriving on campus in 1970.

“He was always there to help, and over the years, that held,” he said. “He trained residents to be excellent clinicians, and he demanded that we treat everyone with dignity.”

After completing his residency in 1977, Ward worked alongside Young until 1990, then opened a private practice in South Carolina. He returned two years later.

“I looked at other hospitals, but felt this was the place to be,” he said. “Harry was here.”

By Janet Showalter

Harold F. Young, M.D., who began his career at VCU in 1972 and served as department chairman from 1985-2015, is famous for his Youngisms:
• “Treat patients, not images.”
• “Don’t cut the steak and butter to live a few more days.”
• “I never go on vacation because people get sick on vacation.”
• “Any organ you can transplant is basically worthless.”
• “It is just a patch job. We can’t give you a new spine.”

14
2016

School of Medicine’s oldest known alumnus, James Spencer Dryden, dies at 106

Born in January 1910 in Poquoson, Virginia, to Alice Lee Hunt and James Oscar Dryden, James Spencer Dryden, M’33, H’40, died at age 106 on June 14, 2016, at his home in Punta Gorda, Florida. He is believed to have been the School of Medicine’s oldest graduate at the time of his death.

In a 50-year career in ophthalmology in Washington, D.C., Dryden was physician and friend to some of the nation’s most prominent politicians. He served as president of the American Association of Ophthalmology in 1970 and also of the MCV Alumni Association in 1958.

James Spencer Dryden, M'33, H’40

James Spencer Dryden, M’33, H’40, at his 103rd birthday party

Following an expedited honors pre-med program at William and Mary College, Dryden entered the Medical College of Virginia in 1929, the onset of the Great Depression. Four years later, at age 23, he graduated and began an internship at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Norfolk, later serving as a medical officer in the Civilian Conservation Corps, stationed in Baltimore, Maryland. He returned to MCV and completed an ophthalmology residency in 1940, becoming a diplomate of the American Board of Ophthalmology in 1942.

With the advent of World War II, Dryden served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps, stationed at Walter Reed Army Hospital in Washington, D.C. Gen. Marietta foresaw that Walter Reed would see many casualties from the western theatre of the war and ordered Dryden to set up a surgery at Soldier’s Home (now the U.S. Soldiers’ and Airmen’s Home) to handle the surgeries of retired military officers who would otherwise be treated at Walter Reed. Designated acting commander and then chief medical officer of Soldiers’ Home, Dryden would go on to be awarded the American Theater Service Medal, American Defense Service Medal and World War II Victory Medal.

At the end of the war he was honorably discharged with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, and opened an ophthalmology practice in Washington, D.C. In 1945 he purchased the ophthalmology practice of Edward L. Morrison, who had been in private practice with William H. Wilmer, founder of Johns Hopkins’ Wilmer Institute of Ophthalmology. Among the artifacts of the Morrison practice were Wilmer’s in-office surgery chair and Wilmer’s ophthalmological “trial case,” which Dryden later donated to the Wilmer Institute’ museum. Dryden estimated that by the time of his own 1991 retirement Wilmer’s surgery chair had been in continuous use for over 100 years.

In Washington, D.C. he served as chief of the Department of Ophthalmology at both Doctors Hospital and Washington Hospital Center. He developed an advanced method of reattaching a dislocated lens and published it in the American Journal of Ophthalmology, “Sclerocorneal Transfixation Method: For the Removal of Posteriorly Dislocated Lenses” in October 1961.

With his proximity to the nation’s capital, many prominent politicians and other dignitaries became his patients and friends. His daughter, Kay Dryden, recalls that J. Edgar Hoover “sent dad a case of whisky every Christmas, and dad and mom always watched the presidential inauguration parades from Hoover’s Pennsylvania Avenue office.”

As president of the Medical Society of the District of Columbia, Dryden appeared on numerous occasions before the U.S. Congressional District of Columbia Oversight Committee. He also served as president of the Washington Ophthalmological Society, in addition to his service to the American Association of Ophthalmology and the MCV Alumni Association.

His interests outside of medicine included developing and managing Colonial Simmental Farms in Westmoreland County, Virginia. For 30 years, Dryden and his wife raised Swiss Simmental cattle on land originally owned by George Washington’s great-grandfather. His daughter Kay told the Newport News, Virginia’s Daily Press newspaper, “These very large cattle would follow him around like puppies because he always kept apples in his pockets.”

Dryden was an accomplished self-taught golfer. At age 79 he broke his age by one stroke at the Bethesda Country Club and was written up in Golf Digest. At age 88 he shot an 85 at the San Francisco Olympic Club, and at age 90 he shot thirteen strokes under his age at St. Andrews South Golf Club in Florida for a score of 77, a feat noted in the local newspapers.

In retirement he enjoyed writing articles, letters to the editor, poems, songs and political satire, which have been variously published, recorded and performed publicly. Dryden was intellectually sharp and physically fit throughout his life. At his 106th birthday he entertained guests by reciting a favorite childhood poem from memory, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s “A Psalm of Life.”

Dryden and his wife, Tricola Inez Mitchell, were married 66 years until her death in 2000. He is survived by three children, eight grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. He will be greatly missed by family and friends who cherished his towering intellect, wisdom, humor, kindness and love. He was a fine gentleman and his generosity of spirit touched all who knew him.

Dryden’s cremated remains will be laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors.

For more information on Dr. Dryden’s life:
James Spencer Dryden, ophthalmologist, Washington Post
Noted eye doctor from Poquoson dies, Daily Press
Ophthalmologist, ex-Westmoreland farm owner dies at 106, Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star

Our thanks to Kay Dryden for contributing to this report.