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14
2016

The Class of 72’s David Lorber: Just say ‘yes’ – to a nontraditional career path

David Lorber, M’72

“Most physicians practice medicine,” says David Lorber, M’72. “But it doesn’t mean you can’t do other things.”

David Lorber, M’72, rarely says no – it’s a trait that has worked out well for him. It’s led him into a career he never planned, but one which has been extremely rewarding, he says.

Lorber visited the MCV Campus this month to share stories with medical students about his nontraditional career that jumped from academia to a busy practice to industry … and almost to the South Pole. “Most physicians practice medicine,” he notes, “but it doesn’t mean you can’t do other things.”

After completing a fellowship at the University of Arizona, he first assumed he’d have a future in academia. But that wasn’t as fulfilling as he hoped, so he ended up in Albuquerque, New Mexico, becoming the state’s fourth pulmonary critical care physician. Despite a grueling schedule, Lorber kept doing more. “I volunteered for everything I could,” he recalls. “Whatever we needed, I always raised my hand.

“My objective was to learn everything I could about the business of health care and to be able to provide value.”

On the side, he started a consulting firm, worked in an emergency and urgent care department and began exploring options for a post-clinical career. Though medicine was rewarding, he says, after two decades, he was burned out on 100-hour work weeks and started looking for something else.

He didn’t have to look long, as all the extra knowledge he’d gleaned paid off in an understanding of all facets of the health care industry.

David Lorber, M’72

Lorber returned to the MCV Campus in November to talk with students about alternative careers in medicine.

A friend at Blue Cross/Blue Shield pointed him towards a job there; he ended up as medical director of Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico, working in utilization management, disease management, provider relations, oversight of pharmacy and credentialing. He also served as medical director for the Indian Health Service Contract Health Services, managed by BCBS. After that, he joined the small company, PCS Health Systems, which eventually transformed into CVS Caremark, where Lorber became a vice president. When he left that job, he was snapped up by Walgreens. “I felt like you can impact the way health care is delivered in the U.S. more in industry than from the clinical side.”

Lorber is rarely content with just one job, and though he calls himself retired, he still works as consultant, entrepreneur, marketer and clinician. One of his side jobs he still loves is working as a consulting physician for National Geographic’s Lindblad Expeditions adventure cruise line.

As the company has grown, he’s become, in effect, the company’s chief medical officer, overseeing about 50 physicians who travel on Lindblad’s ships to remote corners of the earth.

“It can be gut-wrenching when you have something that in an emergency department would be a no-brainer and easy to do, but can become a catastrophe because of where you are,” he says. On a cruise to Antarctica, he once had to treat a patient with a bowel obstruction when the nearest hospital was days away. In Norway, he jumped in to treat a woman with an undiagnosed ectopic pregnancy; the nearest airstrip was on a small island 10 hours away. The patient survived, was treated on the mainland and returned to the ship several days later.

With Lindblad, Lorber has traveled to about 40 countries on all seven continents, allowing him to indulge his passion for photography (check out some of his travel photos below that appeared in the latest issue of the school’s 12th & Marshall magazine).

Lorber continues his routine of learning new skills and keeping an eye out for his next adventure. “You can’t have a five-year plan,” he muses. “You’ve got to be open to new things.”

Still, he says, his career hasn’t been totally random. It’s been about being prepared to be in the right place at the right time. “I really do believe you make your own luck.”

His advice for medical students?

“It’s about relationship building. While you’re in practice, get on committees, get involved politically and get involved any way you can. You’ve got to develop people skills, public speaking skills and the ability to negotiate.

“And learn everything you can. You never know when it’ll come in handy or may spark your interest.”

Always open to opportunities, David Lorber, M’72, said ‘yes’ to National Geographic’s Lindblad Expeditions adventure cruise line. As a result, he’s traveled to about 40 countries on all seven continents. It’s allowed him to indulge his passion for photography, like this shot that was taken in Montenegro. Click the images below for expanded views.

By Lisa Crutchfield

12
2016

M4 Andrew Percy honored with scholarship carrying name of surgeon Jim Brooks

The Class of 2017's Andrew Percy (left) met Stephen Yang, M'84, H'94

The Class of 2017’s Andrew Percy (left) met Stephen Yang, M’84, H’94, at the Southern Thoracic Surgical Association annual meeting in November. Yang helped establish the James W. Brooks Medical Student Scholarship in memory of his mentor, and Percy is the latest recipient.

Ask Andrew Percy, M’17, the key to a successful future and he will sum it up in one word.

Mentorship.

“No matter what field you go into, it helps to have someone guiding you,” he said. “Mentors have always been a special part of my life.”

That bond continues today. Percy was one of two students in the country to receive the James W. Brooks Medical Student Scholarship, which enabled him to attend the Southern Thoracic Surgical Association (STSA) annual meeting in Naples, Florida, Nov. 9-12.

“I was very humbled to be associated with an award in Dr. Brooks’ memory,” Percy said. “He was an important mentor to a lot of people. That’s the spirit of this scholarship. It inspires me to become a better clinician, researcher and person.”

Jim Brooks, M’46, H’55, joined the MCV Campus in 1957 as a thoracic and vascular surgeon and trained hundreds of residents and students. Even after retiring from the operating room, he continued to go into work each day to teach and serve on the admissions committee, communicating his love for the school to all the applicants he met. Appointed emeritus professor of surgery in 2000, he was active on campus until his death in 2008. He was the 23rd president of the STSA.

Jim Brooks, M'46, H'55

Longtime faculty member Jim Brooks, M’46, H’55. Courtesy of Tompkins-McCaw Library’s Special Collections and Archives

“Dr. Brooks had this aura about him,” said Stephen Yang, M’84, H’94, who trained under Brooks and now holds the Arthur B. and Patricia B. Modell Endowed Chair of Thoracic Surgery at Johns Hopkins. “You just loved the man. One of the things that impressed me the most was how much time he spent with his patients. He touched so many lives.”

To honor his memory, Yang helped establish the STSA fund in 2010 that supports the Brooks Scholarship.

“How do you repay the past?” Yang asked. “You want to honor those who trained you, who mentored you.”

Even though Percy never met Brooks, stories about the surgeon still abound on the MCV Campus. Percy has heard enough of them to know he would have loved him, too.

“It sounds like he was a remarkable individual,” Percy said. “He had a great sense of humor.”

Brooks is warmly remembered for not only his compassion, but his quirks. He wore his scrub pants backwards; his glasses hung near the end of his nose; a white towel was draped around his neck; and a bar of Dove soap was always at the scrub sink.

The stories also emphasize how Brooks valued mentorship.
“That’s so important,” Percy said. “I know I wouldn’t be where I am today without mentors.”

Percy’s parents and later his high school cross country coach provided guidance early on. While studying biology and philosophy at Bates College in Maine, Percy spent his summers doing research for the chief of cardiothoracic surgery at Yale. The two have published several papers together since then, and they are currently working on a research project focused on redefining the size cutoff in which surgery is warranted for aortic aneurysms. Percy is also writing a book chapter on the medical management of aortic aneurysms.

After graduating in 2008, Percy worked in research for four years at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center at Harvard Medical School and earned a master’s in medical sciences from Boston University. He has also conducted research in oncology and urology.

“I’ve been fortunate to have been involved in very interesting research projects across different disciplines because of mentors I had who gave me generous opportunities that they were under no obligation to give,” Percy said.

He found that same spirit at the STSA meeting, where he got to know some of the country’s leading cardiac surgeons, including Joseph Coselli, M.D., chief of adult cardiac surgery at the Texas Heart Institute, and Andrea J. Carpenter, M.D., Ph.D., president of the STSA and director of cardiac surgery at the UT School of Medicine in San Antonio.

“They were all so generous with their time,” Percy said. “I want to emulate that and become a mentor to others. I want to make a positive impact. One way to do that is by reflecting on all the help that you received along the way and then paying it forward throughout your career. ”

Do you want to help pay it forward? Learn more about our 1838 Scholarship Campaign aimed at increasing the number and size of available scholarships for the School of Medicine.

By Janet Showalter

20
2016

Alumni host basic science students in Research Triangle Park

Jean Kim, PhD’10 (MICR)

Jean Kim, PhD’10 (MICR) welcomed students to RTI International where she is now a research microbiologist. Photography: Carrie Hawes

Career exploration hit the road when 38 students and four post-docs boarded a bus bound for Raleigh, N.C., to take part in VCU Career Services’ Rams’ Roadtrip program.

The graduate students and postdoctoral scholars from the School of Medicine and the School of Engineering spent two days meeting with researchers, publishers and clinicians to learn more about careers beyond the scope of academia. The goal was for students to walk away with a broader perspective on what they could accomplish after graduation.

Rams’ Roadtrip began because members of VCU Career Services noticed that graduate students were leaving VCU without understanding the breadth of available job opportunities. Many Ph.D. candidates overlook non-academic opportunities in favor of a traditional career trajectory that takes them from doctoral study to postdoctoral research to university faculty, a path where opportunities are in decline.

A 2011 study by the journal Nature noted a 150 percent increase in the number of postdocs from 2000 to 2012. At the same time, full-time, tenure eligible opportunities remained constant or declined. Carrie Hawes, the program’s organizer and assistant director at VCU Career Services, believes exposure through Rams’ Roadtrip helps to enhance students’ perspectives on potential career paths.

Basic science students visit Research Triangle Park

Research Triangle Park was the third stop in the Rams’ Roadtrip program that broadens students’ perspective on careers beyond the scope of academia. Photography: Carrie Hawes

North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park is known for its high concentration of organizations focused on pharmaceutical and biological sciences research and development. So it was an ideal destination in October when students visited Becton Dickinson, Research Square, QuintilesIMS and RTI International. They had the chance to tour the facilities, hear overviews of current research and meet with researchers from each organization.

“This was an awesome opportunity for someone like me in their second year of a Ph.D,” said Supriya Joshi, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Human and Molecular Genetics. “I still have some breathing room to look at opportunities and assess what things work in non-academic careers.”

Jean Kim, PhD’10 (MICR) welcomed students to RTI International where they met with members of the commercialization group to learn about monetizing research. At RTI, students also met Jenny Wiley, Ph.D., an alumna of VCU’s College of Humanities and Sciences and a former faculty member in the medical school’s Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology.

At Research Square, the students were exposed to careers in scientific publishing, meeting Jennifer Mietla, PhD’14 (BIOC), who is now quality control editor with the organization.

Throughout the trip, the students got a heavy dose of career advice from their hosts related to how to find their first job.

“People really got to see what others who had once worked in those exact same VCU labs are doing now,” Hawes said. “It was neat for the students to see what you can do come to life.”

This is the third time VCU Career Services has hosted the Rams’ Roadtrip program. In September 2015, the group took students to Bethesda, Maryland, for a look at science policy and consulting careers through visits to the National Institute of Health, American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, American Society of Microbiology and MedImmune. Students also visited the University of Richmond to explore teaching-focused careers at a liberal arts university.

Organizers say this hands-on program is providing graduate students networking opportunities and a greater awareness of potential career options. Seven students from last year’s trip found employment with non-academic research organizations after graduation.

By Brian Nicholas