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02
2018

Three generations of physicians: Like mother, like daughter

When the Class of 2018’s Cristina Page graduates in May, she’ll be her family’s third-generation of female physicians. She’s pictured here with her mother Lourdes Page, M.D., and grandmother, Florencia Perez, M.D.

When the Class of 2018’s Cristina Page graduates in May, she’ll be her family’s third-generation of female physicians. She’s pictured here with her mother Lourdes Page, M.D., and grandmother, Florencia Perez, M.D.

During World War I, the Medical College of Virginia began admitting women, intended as temporary measure while men were called into battle. But the success of those female students who matriculated in 1918 ensured their permanent place. Now, 100 years later, women make up slightly more than half of medical students nationwide.

No one has a better vantage point on that than Cristina Page. When she graduates from VCU’s School of Medicine May 12, she’ll continue a family tradition, as a third-generation female physician. Her mother and grandmother will be there to proudly watch as she carries on their legacy.

Cristina’s parents, Lourdes Page, M.D., and Paul Page, M.D., are internists in Roanoke. Her grandmother, Florencia Perez, M.D., who lives in southwest Virginia, and late grandfather also were physicians. Various other family members are in the medical field.

Cristina grew up hearing stories of her grandmother’s and mother’s experiences, and marvels how medical school has changed. “Abuelita, my grandmother, says it was like she was an explorer. She still feels inspired by that time.”

Florencia Perez was one of very few women enrolled at the University of Havana’s medical school in the 1950s. As was the norm, each student was responsible for procuring a skeleton to use in anatomy class; often that involved paying a gravedigger to find one at a cemetery. Today, says Cristina, Perez is amazed by the way new technologies, like VCU’s high-tech facilities, have changed how students learn medicine.

At the University of Havana’s medical school in the 1950s, Florencia Perez was one of only a few women enrolled. (She’s pictured here on the aisle of the 4th row.) Now her granddaughter, Cristina Page, is a medical student in an era when women make up slightly more than half of medical students nationwide.

At the University of Havana’s medical school in the 1950s, Florencia Perez was one of only a few women enrolled. (She’s pictured here on the aisle of the 4th row.) Now her granddaughter, Cristina Page, is a medical student in an era when women make up slightly more than half of medical students nationwide.

When Perez graduated in 1954, she and her husband left Cuba to move to the U.S., where they felt they could build their careers, she as a primary care physician and he as an OB-GYN. In the process, they inspired daughter Lourdes to seek a career in medicine.

“I always knew I wanted to be a physician, as long as I can remember,” says Lourdes Page, who also serves on the faculty at Virginia Tech/Carilion School of Medicine. “I made rounds with my mom and dad every chance I could. At 13, I started working in their office. I always knew that’s what I wanted to do. And I’ve loved every bit of it.”

Cristina Page said it took her a little longer to come to the realization that medicine was her future. “I didn’t really think about it until college. But I, too, grew up helping in my parents’ medical office. Mom would take me back to see interesting cases.

“I had wonderful role models who had rewarding careers. It was easy to know that medicine would be a good fit and a good life and rewarding work.”

Susan R. DiGiovanni, M’84, H’87, F’89, senior associate dean for medical education and student affairs, appreciates the role models in Cristina’s life. The varying perspectives they’ve exposed Cristina to, DiGiovanni says, will serve her well as she cares for patients. “Whether it is diversity of gender, race, ethnicity or religion, people just feel more comfortable seeking health care from people they feel understand them better.”

Cristina chose to attend VCU’s School of Medicine because of its engagement with the community and commitment to underserved patients. Fittingly, she was a member of the school’s Mary Baughman student society, named for one of the first women who entered the school in 1918. After graduation, she along with her fiancé and classmate Tanner Hurley will begin residencies in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Cristina is excited to carry on the family tradition. “I think some may hesitate, have an idea that it’s a hard career for women or that they may not be able to balance all the parts of life that they want.

“But I am so fortunate to have a couple of generations of women ahead of me who showed me that it’s all possible. There is nothing holding me back.”

By Lisa Crutuchfield

02
2018

From ion channels to Twitter: Medical Student Research Day

The Class of 2020’s Hameeda A. Naimi

The Class of 2020’s Hameeda A. Naimi – Photo by Joseph V. Morris

With 54 medical students participating, the 2018 Medical Student Research Day showcased more posters than ever before.

“We saw everything from ion channels to Twitter,” says Michael Donnenberg, M.D., senior associate dean for research and research training.

View the 2018 Student Research Day Poster Titles >>

With topics covering both basic and clinical sciences, the students’ posters were reviewed by a panel of judges for originality, understanding, clarity and discussion. Three presentations emerged as the winners.

Top prize went to the Class of 2020’s Hameeda A. Naimi for her presentation, “Characterization of bladder sensation event descriptions during non-invasive oral hydration in healthy adults.” Her first place finish comes with an award of $1,000, made possible by the G. Watson James III, M.D. Scholarship Endowment.

The endowment carries the name of James, a 1943 graduate of the medical school who went on to become chairman of the Division of Hematology in the Department of Internal Medicine, explains retired professor Gordon Archer, M.D., who oversaw Medical Student Research Day during his tenure as senior associate dean for research and research training.

“Dr. James established the first Laboratory of Clinical Investigation at MCV,” says Archer, who personally knew James. “An outstanding scientist and the quintessential physician, clinician, scholar and teacher, he was also a fisherman, sailor and student of the piano. At his death in 2001, Dr. James’ friends and family established the scholarship that goes to the medical student who wins the research competition, a fitting legacy for the outstanding physician-scientist.”

Naimi conducted her research as part of the Dean’s Summer Research Fellowship Program. The student-initiated eight-week projects take place between students’ first and second years of medical school. The number of fellowships is limited, and the application process is, therefore, very competitive. Selected projects like Naimi’s are supported with a $2,500 research stipend.

Adam P. Klausner, M.D., professor of surgery in the Division of Urology, served as Naimi’s research mentor.

“Hameeda has been a superstar and a fantastic addition to my research team,” says Klausner, who holds the Warren Koontz Professorship of Urologic Research and also serves as the Department of Surgery’s associate chair for clinical and translational research.

“Her research project also won first prize in the clinical essay competition at our national meeting, the Society of Urodynamics, Female Pelvic Medicine and Urogenital Reconstruction, beating out many established clinicians and scientists.”

The second place prize went to the Class of 2020’s Dong Jin Suh, who holds an Aesculapian Scholarship made possible by the School of Medicine’s Annual Fund. His presentation was titled “The Effects of Curcumin/Melatonin Hybrid on Synaptic Plasticity following Traumatic Brain Injury.”

The third place finisher was the Class of 2020’s Alvin J. Chang and his presentation, “Effects of Ruthenium Red on ligand-activated TRPV2 Channel Gating.”

In addition to the top prize of $1,000, the second and third place posters are awarded prizes of $500 and $250, respectively. The students were also recognized at the medical school’s Kinloch Nelson, M.D. Student Honors Day on April 20.

By Erin Lucero

02
2018

Medical Education Symposium 2018

List of symposium award recipients

Advances in patient care and science are not the only focus of research and innovation at the VCU School of Medicine. As a center for teaching and learning, the school also promotes work to better understand, enhance and continue improving the education process.

To bring more attention to this work, the school’s second annual Medical Education Symposium, celebrating scholarship and innovation, was held on April 4 in the McGlothlin Medical Education Center. Oral presentations, followed by a reception and poster session, provided an opportunity for medical school faculty and other medical educators on the MCV Campus to showcase and share with colleagues unique projects and practices for education innovation.

The symposium is designed “to promote an increased emphasis on scholarship in medical education,” says Terry Carter, Ed.D., the medical school’s associate dean for professional instruction and faculty development. “It’s a nice opportunity to see the breadth as well as depth of current medical innovation and scholarship at VCU.”

Presentations at the symposium included the use of holographic “enhanced reality” technology to help teach urogynecological surgical procedures, teamwork-building in first-year medical students and leadership-skill development among pediatric residents. Presenters and attendees alike expressed enthusiasm for the symposium as well as for being able to learn about the work of colleagues and to discover potential opportunities for collaboration and new ideas they might bring to their own disciplines and practices.

“This venue is great because it gives us an opportunity to find out what other people are doing here at VCU,” observed Kelly Lockeman, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the School of Medicine who is also director of evaluation and assessment for VCU’s Center for Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Care. She was particularly interested in the many initiatives centered on quality improvement. “So many departments are incorporating these efforts,” she said. “There are a lot of things going on that are striving to make the education more effective and even to figure out what ‘being effective’ means.”

Lauren Wingfield, M.D., a PGY-2 resident in emergency medicine, said the symposium “gives us a chance not only to show off what we are doing, but also to learn about what’s going on elsewhere in the hospital and to be able to incorporate that into our practice in the ER.”

The symposium included six oral presentations and 21 poster presentations selected from among more than 40 submissions. A panel of faculty with expertise in medical education served as judges.

Assistant Professor Nital Appelbaum, Ph.D., received the award for best faculty oral presentation for her talk “Why Residents’ Perceptions of the Clinical Learning Environment Matter.” She discussed how what’s known as the hidden curriculum, or “underlying norms and beliefs of a group that drive behavior” might affect whether residents and students feel supported and safe to express ideas or concerns. In turn, those perceptions might affect the efficacy of the learning environment and, ultimately, patient safety, she said. “We have a duty in medical education to not only ensure our trainees demonstrate competence in their specialty, but also to provide an environment that facilitates both work and learning processes, especially if we are to attain the goal of providing the best care to patients,” noted Appelbaum in her presentation.

The best trainee presentation award went to John Legge, M.D., a PGY-3 resident in adult neurology, whose poster outlined the education series developed in his department to introduce residents to the business and policy dynamics of health care. Traditionally, says Legge, this is information that medical education hasn’t covered. “It is something we have identified in all residency programs, not just neurology, as a weakness, and we are trying to bridge that gap,” he says. “The idea is for you to be able to walk out with more knowledge about business and policy and medicine than what you came in with.”

By Caroline Kettlewell

17
2018

Endowed Scholarship Brunch connects scholarship donors, recipients

Steven P. Heckel speaks at the MCV Foundation Endowed Scholarship Brunch next to a photo of his sister Janice Heckel, M'80, H'84. Steven P. Heckel speaks at the MCV Campus Endowed Scholarship Brunch next to a photo of his sister Janice Heckel, M’80, H’84. View more photos from the annual brunch

Today, the dream of a career in medicine often comes with a heavy burden of debt. In the Class of 2017, only 42 students graduated debt-free.

The remaining students carried an average debt of $201,370.

Janice Heckel, M’80, H’84, knew the toll this debt could take on students and how it might influence their choice of specialty. She included a bequest to the MCV Foundation in her will, and after her passing in 2014, the Janice L. Heckel Scholarship was established in the School of Medicine.

In February, Heckel’s brother Steven spoke at the MCV Campus Endowed Scholarship Brunch, saying his sister wanted to defray the educational expenses of medical students so they could feel free and empowered to become the types of doctors they truly want to be.

As they pursue that goal, Heckel said his sister would have wanted the future physicians, pharmacists, nurses, therapists and dentists in the room to keep a sense of humor and perpetuate the kindness from which they’ve all benefited.

The annual scholarship brunch provides an opportunity for donors to the five health sciences schools to meet the students who are benefiting from their gifts and investments. This year, more students than ever before have had their burden lightened, as the number of endowed scholarships at the MCV Foundation grew to 391 funds and paid out $2.8 million in scholarship awards.

In the School of Medicine, the 1838 Campaign aims to increase the number and size of its scholarships to give the school a competitive edge for recruiting top students, rewarding student excellence and reducing the burden of debt. Full- and half-tuition scholarships are most urgently needed.

Thanks to the support of alumni and friends, 21 new student scholarships already have been established during the 1838 Campaign. An additional nine will be awarded this fall, and 16 more are currently in the works. Another 46 existing scholarship funds have increased in size with the addition of new gifts.

“We’re beyond thankful for the friends who have already invested in the future of our students and we’re eager to continue the momentum,” says Dean of Medicine Peter F. Buckley, M.D. “The 1838 Campaign is our approach to helping talented and compassionate students fulfill their dream of becoming physicians — regardless of their families’ financial resources. We can’t do it alone.”

12
2018

Organs for sale

Distinguished transplant surgeon Francis Delmonico, H’78, helps lead global fight against human-organ trafficking for profit. 

In 1957, the Medical College of Virginia’s legendary “restless genius,” David Hume, M.D., performed the first organ transplant in Virginia – a kidney donated between twins. Hume’s pioneering work in transplant medicine helped usher in a new era of hope for patients and laid the foundation for what today is VCU Health’s Hume-Lee Transplant Center, named in honor of Hume and his colleague and longtime chief of transplantation for the medical center, H.M. Lee, H’61.

Francis Delmonico, H’77, has been called both a respected elder statesman as well as a respected trailblazer. “No other transplant professional has done so much or worked so hard to insist on fair and ethical treatment of the live-organ donor and ethical use of the donated organ.”

Francis Delmonico, H’78, has been called both a respected elder statesman as well as a respected trailblazer. “No other transplant professional has done so much or worked so hard to insist on fair and ethical treatment of the live-organ donor and ethical use of the donated organ.” Photo Credit: Skip Rowland

Yet the medical breakthroughs that made organ transplantation possible also inadvertently spawned a darker legacy. Worldwide, the need for human organs for transplant – particularly kidneys – greatly exceeds the number that become available each year from living and deceased donors; in the U.S. alone, more than 100,000 people on the organ-transplant waiting list need a kidney. This stark disparity, coupled with the fact that kidneys can be taken from living donors, has fueled the rise in a lucrative international black market – the trafficking of human organs for profit.

During a December 2017 weekend celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Hume-Lee Transplant Center, Francis Delmonico, H’78, presented a keynote address on organ trafficking and the international effort – in which he’s played a leadership role – to fight it.

Organ trafficking is a complex global business and a “microcosm of social dysfunction,” said Delmonico. At one end of the transaction are people with money and the need for an organ. At the other end are the impoverished and vulnerable – migrants seeking passage to Europe, persecuted minorities, individuals ensnared in human-trafficking. The traffickers lure donors with promises of money, jobs or other opportunities, and sell the organs for amounts that can exceed $200,000 for a kidney. “Transplant tourism” results when recipients travel to another country for the surgery.

“The levels of corruption get so disgraceful that it staggers you,” said Delmonico, “but it is all about money.”

In some cases donors in desperate need actively seek to sell a kidney. In other cases, donors are solicited with sometimes false or misleading information. And in even more horrifying situations, unwitting victims have been imprisoned or held captive and forced to submit to kidney removal. The fate of these donors is often unknown, but some have shared stories of promised payments that never come, of failing health, of being unable to work anymore.

Recipients too are vulnerable. They may be extorted for an ever-increasing fee, may receive a compromised or even non-functioning organ, may be provided with inadequate care, and sometimes suffer serious medical complications or even death.

In his presentation, Delmonico outlined this portrait of human misery exploited for profit and spoke of how he came to be involved in the fight against organ trafficking. His inspiration, he said, reaches back to his days among one of the last cohorts of residents to study under Hume before the physician’s untimely death in a plane crash. The exacting, patient-focused training Delmonico received under Hume, Lee and the other surgeons here, he said, set the standard he has practiced through his own long and distinguished surgical career at Massachusetts General Hospital, where he continues to serve as emeritus director of transplantation and as professor of surgery for Harvard Medical School.

Delmonico’s prominence and accomplishments in his field led in 2005 to his election as president of UNOS (the United Network for Organ Sharing), which manages the organ-transplant system in the United States. A year later in 2006, he was appointed as advisor to the World Health Organization (WHO) on transplantation matters and accepted the position of director of medical affairs for the international Transplantation Society.

In 2016, Francis Delmonico, H’77, was appointed by Pope Francis to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, which last year held a summit calling on the world to repudiate the practices of organ trafficking and human trafficking for organ removal and to promote ethical principles of transplantation.

In 2016, Francis Delmonico, H’78, was appointed by Pope Francis to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, which last year held a summit calling on the world to repudiate the practices of organ trafficking and human trafficking for organ removal and to promote ethical principles of transplantation.

In 2004, the WHO had called on its member states to address the problem of international organ trafficking and transplant tourism. For his leadership role in the transplant community, Delmonico travelled all over the world, in collaboration with the WHO, to gather a deep understanding of the problem. What he saw was profoundly disturbing, intolerable for a surgeon whose principles were shaped by the pioneers under whom he had learned during his residency.

“There is a regard for the nobility and science of organ transplantation derived from Dr. Hume,” said Delmonico, “that must not be prostituted by organ sales.”

In 2008, Delmonico was instrumental in helping convene an international gathering – the Istanbul Summit – where more than 150 medical leaders, scientists, public-policy experts, ethicists, legal scholars and others together worked to draft what would become known as the Declaration of Istanbul. The landmark statement called for all countries to establish a “legal and professional framework” for organ donation and transplantation that safeguards donors and recipients, enforces standards and prohibits unethical practices, including the financial exploitation of donors through buying and selling organs.

Delmonico continues to serve as senior advisor to the volunteer Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group to promote, implement and uphold the Declaration across the globe. More recently, in 2016, Delmonico was appointed by Pope Francis to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, which this past year held its own summit, calling organ trafficking and human trafficking for organ removal “crimes against humanity” and calling on the world to repudiate these practices and promote ethical principles of transplantation.

By Caroline Kettlewell

  

 

A “respected trailblazer”: Francis Delmonico, H’78

In 1971, Francis Delmonico came to Richmond to begin his residency in surgery, aspiring to a career in the still-young field of organ transplantation. More than 45 years later, he still recalls with appreciation the qualities of the surgeons who trained him, like H.M. Lee, H’61, (“a great teacher”), B.W. Haynes, H’46, (“so exhilarating to watch”), and the legendary chairman of the Department of Surgery, David Hume, M.D., who, Delmonico remembers, was unpretentious enough to repair a shoe by wrapping it in tape, but exacting and unyielding in what he expected of his residents.

At the Hume-Lee Transplant Center’s 60th Anniversary, Francis Delmonico, H’77, reunited with Kyung Ok Chi Lee, M.D., the widow of transplant pioneer H.M. Lee, M.D., for whom the center is named.

At the Hume-Lee Transplant Center’s 60th Anniversary, Francis Delmonico, H’78, reunited with Kyung Ok C. Lee, M.D., the widow of transplant pioneer H.M. Lee, M.D., for whom the center is named. Photo Credit: Kevin Morley

When Hume died at the end of Delmonico’s second year, though, the young resident’s future was thrown into uncertainty. Delmonico had been slated to complete a research fellowship in transplantation under Hume’s direction, but now, “There was no guarantee that there would be the opportunity,” says Delmonico.

Fortunately, a place was found for Delmonico at Massachusetts General Hospital both to participate in research and to continue clinical service. He took with him the standards of excellence in which he’d trained in Richmond; “I knew how to take care of patients,” says Delmonico.

After two years in Boston, Delmonico returned to Richmond to complete his residency, serving the final year as chief resident. But the professional relationship formed with the chief of surgery while in Boston would lead to him being invited back to join the staff at Massachusetts General.

Delmonico practiced surgery at Massachusetts General until 2005, achieving an impressive list of accomplishments and earning broad recognition, including the National Kidney Foundation’s David M. Hume Award for exemplifying “high ideals of scholarship and humanitarianism.”

“He truly is both a respected elder statesman as well as a respected trailblazer,” notes Marlon Levy, M.D., chair of the Division of Transplant Surgery and director of the VCU Hume-Lee Transplant Center. “No other transplant professional has done so much or worked so hard to insist on fair and ethical treatment of the live-organ donor and ethical use of the donated organ.”

By Caroline Kettlewell

03
2018

Alumna and faculty member Betsy Ripley named fellow in Executive Leadership Program for Women in Academic Medicine

Betsy Ripley, M'86, H'92, interim senior associate dean for faculty affairs in the medical school, has been named a 2017-18 fellow in the Executive Leadership Program for Women in Academic Medicine.

Betsy Ripley, M’86, H’92, interim senior associate dean for faculty affairs in the medical school, has been named a 2017-18 fellow in the Executive Leadership Program for Women in Academic Medicine.

The keys to becoming a successful leader, says Betsy Ripley, M’86, H’92, MS’04 (BIOS), begin with being open to the opportunities that come your way while taking time to do your current job well.

“By being a leader and doing your job well on a daily basis, you’re not just shooting for the next job. You’re contributing along the way,” Ripley says. “Be active and participate. People will remember that and you’ll be asked to do the next thing. It all builds on itself.”

Saying “yes” has led Ripley down a path to her current role as interim senior associate dean for faculty affairs for the VCU School of Medicine and, more recently, as a 2017-18 fellow with the prestigious Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine. ELAM is a year-long part-time fellowship for women faculty in schools of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and public health.

A core program of the Institute for Women’s Health and Leadership at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, ELAM is dedicated to developing the professional and personal skills required to lead and manage in today’s complex health environment, with special attention to the unique challenges facing women in leadership positions.

“Applicants have to be incredibly accomplished to earn their position and Dr. Ripley was accepted the first time she applied,” says Dean of Medicine Peter F. Buckley, M.D., who also serves as Ripley’s ELAM sponsor. “This national recognition comes as no surprise to those of us who see Betsy’s outstanding work with faculty on a daily basis. I couldn’t be more proud to see her represent our medical school as part of ELAM.”

More than 1,000 ELAM alumnae hold leadership positions in institutions around the world. The VCU School of Medicine has sponsored 12 previous ELAM fellows.

“At VCU, we have a lot of good strong women leaders — Marsha Rappley, Deborah Davis, Deborah Zimmermann, Melinda Hancock, to name a few,” Ripley says. “Phenomenal women who speak to how open VCU is to developing and growing our women.”

As part of ELAM, fellows participate in three week-long on-site training sessions in September, January and April, in addition to working on assignments and reading throughout the year, participating in the leadership online curriculum and communicating regularly with ELAM colleagues.

Each fellow works on an Institutional Action Project that aligns with her experiences and meets an organizational goal or need at her home university. Ripley chose a cause near and dear to her heart: education and training for faculty members.

“In medical school, we don’t go to class to become a faculty member,” she says. “You come up through the ranks and — poof! — you’re a faculty member.”

In an effort to ensure that faculty development opportunities at the medical school better meet faculty’s needs, Ripley is cataloging each development opportunity offered through the school, assigning it to a particular competency (general knowledge, leadership, scholarship or teaching and service) and determining where more resources are needed.

“We offer a lot of development opportunities but what do our faculty truly need to grow and become successful?” Ripley asks. “Along the way, what they need to know may change. What resources are needed for that growth?”

Ripley will present her project at ELAM’s on-site meeting in April not only to this year’s 54-member ELAM class, but to a host of deans, including Buckley, who will attend the final session. Networking and mentoring opportunities among national leaders is a key component of ELAM’s ultimate goal to expand the national pool of qualified women candidates for leadership in academic medicine, dentistry and public health.

She attributes her leadership success to a multitude of mentors at the medical school: Domenic Sica, M.D., Berry Fowler, M.D., John Nestler, M.D., and Dick Wenzel, M.D., all in the Department of Internal Medicine, as well as retired senior associate dean of faculty affairs P.J. Coney, M.D., and, now, Dean of Medicine Buckley.

“I’m blessed to be at an institution that’s recognized the leadership skills within me,” says Ripley, who earned her medical degree at VCU and remained on the MCV Campus to complete residency training. “I’m lucky many people have helped me when I needed it and encouraged me along the way.”

Ripley remembers a “say yes” moment when early in her career, she applied for a National Institutes of Health K Award at the encouragement of Wenzel and Fowler. She received the award and it led her to sit on a panel of VCU’s Institutional Review Board, of which she later became senior chair. It sparked an interest in research ethics that led to a master’s degree from the Department of Biostatistics, an AMA ethics fellowship, and the role as clinical research compliance officer for the university.

Ultimately, her clinical and research experience, combined with her dual role as a mother to three sons, led her to faculty affairs, first in the Department of Internal Medicine and later in the School of Medicine.

“I can speak to the variety of challenges faculty members might face, both in the workplace and at home,” Ripley says.

Sometimes, it only takes that one voice telling — and showing — others it’s possible that can make all the difference. It was in her medical school interview on the MCV Campus with a female faculty member when Ripley heard the words that molded how she approached medicine, a career and family.

“She said ‘you can do it all — if you want to,'” Ripley says. “I had that one woman who told me I could.”

Now she serves as that one voice of encouragement for faculty members across the School of Medicine, taking her place as a role model and mentor for countless others.

By Polly Roberts

Virginia Commonwealth University
VCU Medical Center
School of Medicine
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Updated: 04/29/2016