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09
2017

M4 John Weeks returns to Eastern Shore to treat underserved population

For the Class of 2017’s John Weeks, practicing medicine means more than providing care to patients in an exam room. It’s a commitment to caring for an entire community and the challenges it may face.

That’s why after earning his undergraduate degree from the College of William & Mary and spending three years as an outreach worker on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, he enrolled in the VCU School of Medicine where he also was accepted into the International/Inner City/Rural Preceptorship program on the MCV Campus. I2CRP is a four-year program for students who declare an interest in and commitment to working with medically underserved populations in urban, rural or international settings.

“The I2CRP program is one of the big things that drew me to VCU,” says Weeks. “There’s an overall sense that you can really make an impact — improving people’s lives and improving the community they live in. It’s not just serving one patient, treating them, and moving on to the next, but going beyond and helping a whole community.”

International/Inner City/Rural Preceptorship program ‘Open your eyes and look around you’
In addition to working for the Eastern Shore Rural Health System prior to medical school, he returned during his third-year family medicine clerkship and fourth-year community immersion elective. There Weeks experienced firsthand the challenges of providing effective medical care to an underserved population that included the indigent, elderly and Spanish-speaking migrant farm workers.

For starters, some of the biggest hurdles he saw had very little to do with the medical issues that originally brought patients to the clinic. High blood pressure, diabetes and work-related injuries are further complicated by high levels of poverty, housing and food insecurity, lack of transportation, exposure to pesticides and chemicals, legal problems with immigration status or navigating Medicare.

“People think that to truly find the underserved, you have to go international,” Weeks said. “But that’s just not the case. All you have to do is open your eyes and look around you. The biggest similarity of all underserved populations, regardless of location, is access.”

Serving the Eastern Shore population has particular meaning for Weeks, who grew up in Northern Virginia and appreciated the small, intimate community he met on the shore.

“It was constantly amazing to me how much the people knew each other,” he says. “The outreach worker I partnered with knew not only everyone’s family ties, but where they lived, what they needed and, most importantly, what resources they might be willing to accept to help them through difficult times.”

Weeks received the medical school’s Scott Scholarship, awarded by the Marguerite L. Hopkins Trust and James Perkins Memorial Trust to a deserving medical student from Virginia with preference given to a student with ties to the Eastern Shore.

Marguerite Hopkins grew up on the Eastern Shore and stipulated that some of the funds in her trust should be used to create an annual scholarship named for her cousin, Ralph M. Scott, M’50. Scholarships continue to be a high-priority need for the medical school and donors may outline criteria to select student recipients, including supporting students from a particular geographic region.

‘I want to go someplace and make people healthier’
Approximately 24 students are admitted to I2CRP from each medical school class, said Mark Ryan, M’00, H’03, I2CRP medical director and assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Population Health. “Our students are amazing. They have diverse experiences and diverse backgrounds but a similar sense of ‘I want to go someplace and make people healthier where otherwise they would have struggled.’”

Since its first graduating class in 2000, 37 percent of I2CRP graduates have gone on to practice in family medicine with nearly a third of those practicing in rural areas. All told, 85 percent of graduates enter careers in the National Health Service Corps priority fields of family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, combined internal medicine-pediatrics, OB-GYN, psychiatry and general surgery.

I2CRP director Mary Lee Magee attributes much of the program’s success to its curriculum that spans all four years of medical school, starting with electives in the spring semester of M1 and ending with a month-long community immersion during M4. Along the way, students share their experiences with their peers and faculty members.

“Our retention rate is very strong,” she says. “The program offers meaningful opportunities for critical thinking, reflection, mentorship and community building that are essential to support careers in underserved communities.”

That support is designed to go beyond graduation, Ryan says, when the challenges of caring for the underserved can become trying.

“Patients can’t fill prescriptions, can’t get to appointments, don’t have the same language as their physicians,” he says. “There will be times when it feels very hard to sustain and it’s important to have a support system to lean on. Hopefully through I2CRP, John and others will develop a network of peers, physicians and faculty who they can ask for advice and connect with when that time comes.”

It’s advice Weeks takes to heart as he applies for a family medicine residency with the ultimate goal of working “where people need me.”

“Find the little victories,” he says. “Some patients have a million obstacles lying in their path but if you can remove one or some of those obstacles, it’s huge. Every piece of the puzzle matters and once you start putting it together and help people get healthy, you realize everything you do, no matter how big or small, can be really rewarding.”

By Polly Roberts

30
2017

MD-PhD students spotlighted in Internal Medicine’s research newsletter

A pair of M.D.-Ph.D. students have been featured in the winter 2017 issue of the Department of Internal Medicine’s research newsletter. The Class of 2017’s Bridget Quinn and Tim Kegelman are both preparing to graduate this spring and hoping for a residency match in radiation oncology.

M.D.-Ph.D. student Bridget Quinn

M.D.-Ph.D. student Bridget Quinn is preparing to graduate from the program this spring and hoping for a residency match in radiation oncology.

Originally from central New Jersey, Bridget Quinn earned her bachelor’s degree from Loyola University in Maryland and then she spent two years doing ovarian cancer research at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia before entering medical school. Quinn had been drawn to a career in clinical medicine since she was young, but it was the two years she spent in the lab after college that pushed her to pursue a dual degree.

The M.D.-Ph.D. dual degree program is designed to provide students the knowledge to ask pertinent and meaningful clinical questions that may ultimately lead to novel discovery in the medical field. The degree gives graduates the preparation to stay involved in research and work on the translational border between science and medicine.

Quinn completed her Ph.D. work in the lab of Department Chair Paul B. Fisher, M.Ph., Ph.D., in the Department of Human and Molecular Genetics where she focused on novel therapeutics for pancreatic cancer.

After completing the graduate phase of her MD-PhD program in late 2014, Quinn has been working on clinical research projects with the Department of Radiation Oncology’s Emma C. Fields while completing the program’s medicine phase. In addition to providing clinical mentorship, Fields has also spent time with Quinn discussing various aspects of career planning and the process of applying to residency programs. Quinn is currently applying to residency in the field of radiation oncology and plans to do an internal medicine intern year. You can read more about her background and research on page 5 in the Department of Internal Medicine’s research newsletter.

Finding a career that balances discoveries with patients

In Tim Kegelman’s final year of the MD-PhD program, he’s pursued an elective with the Center for Human-Animal Interaction. Now he’s certified his Siberian Husky, Lola, to be a Therapy Dog and part of VCU’s Dogs on Call program.

Tim Kegelman grew up in Yorktown, Virginia, where his mom, a nurse practitioner, and his dad, a NASA scientist, influenced his interest in becoming a physician-scientist. The path he took led to the University of Notre Dame where he pursued a chemical engineering degree.

Drawn by the potential of making discoveries in medical sciences while also having significant and direct patient interactions, Kegelman enrolled in the M.D.-Ph.D. program. Like Quinn, he performed his dissertation research with Department Chair Paul Fisher, M.Ph., Ph.D., where he could explore his interest in cancer molecular biology and genetics.

He’s known he wanted to work in oncology research since he enrolled in the M.D.-Ph.D. program, and more recently he’s begun collaborating with the Department of Radiation Oncology on projects combining a small molecule inhibitor in combination with radiation in glioblastoma.

While at Notre Dame, Kegelman worked as an undergraduate research assistant in the chemical engineering department. He also was captain of the men’s swim team and competed at the NCAA championships. He has applied a student-athlete’s work ethic to various aspects of M.D.-Ph.D. training and credits his time as a collegiate swimmer with helping him integrate well into new teams – which is something he does regularly during his clinical training.

Away from campus, both Quinn and Kegelman have young children as well as a love for dogs. Kegelman, in fact, recently certified his Siberian Husky to be a therapy dog as part of VCU’s Dogs on Call program.

You can read more about Kegelman on page 7 of the Department of Internal Medicine’s research newsletter.

20
2016

Alumni host basic science students in Research Triangle Park

Jean Kim, PhD’10 (MICR)

Jean Kim, PhD’10 (MICR) welcomed students to RTI International where she is now a research microbiologist. Photography: Carrie Hawes

Career exploration hit the road when 38 students and four post-docs boarded a bus bound for Raleigh, N.C., to take part in VCU Career Services’ Rams’ Roadtrip program.

The graduate students and postdoctoral scholars from the School of Medicine and the School of Engineering spent two days meeting with researchers, publishers and clinicians to learn more about careers beyond the scope of academia. The goal was for students to walk away with a broader perspective on what they could accomplish after graduation.

Rams’ Roadtrip began because members of VCU Career Services noticed that graduate students were leaving VCU without understanding the breadth of available job opportunities. Many Ph.D. candidates overlook non-academic opportunities in favor of a traditional career trajectory that takes them from doctoral study to postdoctoral research to university faculty, a path where opportunities are in decline.

A 2011 study by the journal Nature noted a 150 percent increase in the number of postdocs from 2000 to 2012. At the same time, full-time, tenure eligible opportunities remained constant or declined. Carrie Hawes, the program’s organizer and assistant director at VCU Career Services, believes exposure through Rams’ Roadtrip helps to enhance students’ perspectives on potential career paths.

Basic science students visit Research Triangle Park

Research Triangle Park was the third stop in the Rams’ Roadtrip program that broadens students’ perspective on careers beyond the scope of academia. Photography: Carrie Hawes

North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park is known for its high concentration of organizations focused on pharmaceutical and biological sciences research and development. So it was an ideal destination in October when students visited Becton Dickinson, Research Square, QuintilesIMS and RTI International. They had the chance to tour the facilities, hear overviews of current research and meet with researchers from each organization.

“This was an awesome opportunity for someone like me in their second year of a Ph.D,” said Supriya Joshi, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Human and Molecular Genetics. “I still have some breathing room to look at opportunities and assess what things work in non-academic careers.”

Jean Kim, PhD’10 (MICR) welcomed students to RTI International where they met with members of the commercialization group to learn about monetizing research. At RTI, students also met Jenny Wiley, Ph.D., an alumna of VCU’s College of Humanities and Sciences and a former faculty member in the medical school’s Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology.

At Research Square, the students were exposed to careers in scientific publishing, meeting Jennifer Mietla, PhD’14 (BIOC), who is now quality control editor with the organization.

Throughout the trip, the students got a heavy dose of career advice from their hosts related to how to find their first job.

“People really got to see what others who had once worked in those exact same VCU labs are doing now,” Hawes said. “It was neat for the students to see what you can do come to life.”

This is the third time VCU Career Services has hosted the Rams’ Roadtrip program. In September 2015, the group took students to Bethesda, Maryland, for a look at science policy and consulting careers through visits to the National Institute of Health, American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, American Society of Microbiology and MedImmune. Students also visited the University of Richmond to explore teaching-focused careers at a liberal arts university.

Organizers say this hands-on program is providing graduate students networking opportunities and a greater awareness of potential career options. Seven students from last year’s trip found employment with non-academic research organizations after graduation.

By Brian Nicholas

14
2016

Seven dozen student and physicians on hand for 2016 Cheese & Chat

The lobby of the McGlothlin Medical Education Center was buzzing on a Friday evening in October. Fifty-four M1 and M2 students had come out to meet seasoned physicians in 2016’s Cheese & Chat.

 scroll below for pictures from 2016 Cheese & Chat scroll below for pictures from 2016 Cheese & Chat

A speed networking styled event, the format gave groups of two to four students the chance to speak with up to 30 physicians from a variety of specialties.

“The students enjoyed learning about new specialties that they had previously known very little about,” said the Class of 2019’s Amy Hazzard, vice president of WIMSO.

“It was great to hear from physicians who are passionate about their work and positive about what our careers hold for us in the future. A major takeaway from the event for students was to find a specialty that they are passionate about, no matter how long it may take to get there.”

Physician members from the Richmond Academy of Medicine as well as from VCU Health also shared insights on balancing professional and personal responsibilities.

“I believe students are now more excited about the M3 and M4 clinical years of medical school where we will have the opportunity to learn even more about specialties and clinical medicine in general,” said Hazzard.

Held on Oct. 14 the event was organized by the Women in Medicine Student Organization along with the Medical Student Government and the Academy of Women Surgeons.

Click the images below for expanded views.

Story by Erin Lucero; photography by Kevin Schindler.

26
2016

Longtime Microbiology faculty member Deborah Lebman endows scholarship via her estate plans

Deborah Lebman, Ph.D.

Deborah Lebman, Ph.D.

She makes a difference in students’ lives every day. Now she’s laid the groundwork for her impact to continue even after she leaves the MCV Campus.

Associate Professor Deborah Lebman, Ph.D., joined the Department of Microbiology and Immunology in 1989. A self-proclaimed “fan of our students,” for 18 years she’s directed the immunology course for the medical students and with the advent of the medical school’s new C3 curriculum became co-director of the Infection and Immunity Division.

For several years, Lebman has been a member of the medical school’s admissions committee where, she says, she sees what a great need there is for scholarships.

Earlier this year, she decided to take action and made provisions in her estate plans to create a medical student scholarship.

“I believe that our greatest impact comes from what we give to others,” said Lebman. “Creating a scholarship fund serves the dual purpose of expressing my gratitude for the opportunity to teach the next generation of physicians and giving someone else the opportunity to leave a mark on society.”

Hear what Deborah Lebman has to say about why philanthropy is important

Click to watch a video and hear what Deborah Lebman has to say about why philanthropy is important

Her bequest was featured in the July edition of VCU’s philanthropy email newsletter, Black & Gold & You, that described how bequests can promote academic excellence and strengthen VCU as a diverse premier urban research institution.

The newsletter outlines some benefits associated with bequests:

• Easy to make — You retain your assets throughout your lifetime.

• Revocable — You can make changes to beneficiaries of your estate throughout your lifetime.

• Flexible — Your bequest can be directed to support the university as a whole or a school/program that is important to you.

Photography by Will Gilbert

05
2016

Student group to receive national honor for promoting the scope of family medicine

VCU’s Student Family Medicine Association

VCU’s Student Family Medicine Association is one of 17 student interest groups in the nation to be honored this year.

Each year, the American Academy of Family Physicians honors student-run Family Medicine Interest Groups for their outstanding activities in generating interest in family medicine.

VCU’s Student Family Medicine Association is one of 17 FMIGs to be honored this year. They’ll accept the Excellence in Promoting the Scope of Family Medicine award on July 29 during the AAFP National Conference of Family Medicine Residents and Medical Students in Kansas City, Kansas.

The SFMA on the MCV Campus is one of the oldest and most active student organizations in the medical school and in the state of Virginia. Annually it organizes workshops as well as community and clinical experiences to give medical students a chance to learn more about the role family physicians play within the field of medicine and in the greater community. In addition to a variety of lectures, this past year it coordinated health screenings and sports physicals in medically underserved communities as well as volunteering opportunities and workshops.

“Our SFMA does an exceptional job of finding ways to demonstrate for their classmates how dynamic and diverse family medicine is,” said faculty advisor Judy Gary, M.Ed., assistant director of medical education in the Department of Family Medicine and Population Health.

SFMA Workshop

SFMA organizes workshops for practicing physical exam skills as well as bringing in community physicians to address hot topics like vaccines and palliative care.

“They organized workshops for practicing physical exam skills as well as bringing in community physicians to address hot topics like vaccines and palliative care. And each time, the physician speakers discussed the field, their experience practicing in a variety of settings and how they incorporate special interests like sports medicine, women’s health, geriatrics and integrative care into their practice.”

The AAFP’s Program of Excellence Awards recognize FMIGs from around the country for their efforts to promote interest in family medicine and family medicine programming.

“Attracting medical students to the specialty of family medicine is critical to addressing the ongoing primary care physician shortage,” said Clif Knight, M.D., senior vice president for education at the AAFP. “Excellent FMIGs such as these award winners are an important component in these efforts. They’re essential to helping medical students understand the professional responsibilities and satisfaction of being a family physician.

The AAFP has posted SFMA’s winning application online as an example of best practices and programming ideas for FMIGs nationwide.