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CSL Daily

October 6, 2010

Author Denny Kuiper Speaks to CSL Students

The Center for Sport Leadership (CSL) was happy to welcome Denny Kuiper, author of Know Yourself as a Coach, as a guest in its Coaching and Administration class on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2010. In his lecture, he discussed a few of the lessons detailed within the pages of his book.

Kuiper began by explaining how a coach could be effective, whether aggressive or passive, an introvert or extrovert. The idea that being a great coach can encompass every type of personality, rather than only those with certain personality types, caught the attention of some CSL students. Until Kuiper’s lecture, some students had believed a special type of personality was required to be a great coach. Kuiper said the best thing anyone could do to become a more effective coach was to implement the 25% rule. The 25% rule states that if one moves 25% in the opposite direction from the personality that he or she currently employs, he or she can become an incredible coach. This means that if someone is traditionally calm, sometimes he or she should show emotions and if someone is traditionally aggressive, sometimes he or she should exhibit a calmer demeanor. This idea resonated with CSL students as some realized that it is not about changing people’s personalities to fit where they would like to work or what they would like to do, but rather it is about adapting to where they are. Kuiper believes that by encouraging individuals to be flexible it will help lead to increased success.

Another valuable lesson provided by Kuiper was for CSL students to begin thinking about what type of position would be a good fit for them. A great job for one person may not necessarily be good for someone else. CSL students need to know who they are and what they personally require to be satisfied in a given position. Kuiper said, “We are who we are.” It is important for people to treat each job as if they are going to be the best person for that position and as if they are going to be the best in the world at that one job. “Be big time where you are,” Kuiper says.

Kuiper’s speech to the Coaching and Administration class was unique, because although he knew what he was going to discuss, he allowed the class to choose what direction the discussion took. Questions ranged from how to deal with time and stress to coaching less passionate players.

“I personally learned a great deal from Denny Kuiper’s speech, as I’m sure many others did. Learning who you are before teaching others is a valuable lesson that new and long-time coaches can benefit from.” Rachel Rhoney, current CSL student.

The CSL thanks Denny Kuiper for taking the time to share his ideas and lessons with current CSL students.

By: Rachel Rhoney, CSL Class of 2011