Meet Hillary Miller

hillary miller portraitToday’s the big day! The next Digital Pragmata panel is happening today at 12:00: “Framing the Digital.” At 2:00 we’re hosting a Publishing Makerspace, an informal working group led by VCU Libraries’ Hillary Miller. She is the Scholarly Communications Outreach Librarian at VCU, and works regularly with the VCU community to talk about issues and opportunities in the scholarly publishing ecosystem. Hillary earned her MLS from UNC Chapel Hill in 2015 and has experience with digitization and archives on top of her scholarly communication expertise.


Please join us on October 5, 2016 from 12:00 noon to 1:30 PM in the James Branch Cabell Library, Multipurpose Room (Room 250). The event is free and open to the public. Please feel free to register, but also fell free just to come see what it’s all about. If you attend the panel and find yourself eager for more, stay for our collaborative Publishing Makerspace.

Parking is available for a fee in the West Broad StreetWest Main Street and West Cary Street parking decks. If special accommodations are needed or to register by phone, please call Gregory Kimbrell, events and programs coordinator, at (804) 828-0593 prior to April 26.

Meet Jeremy Boggs

photo of jeremy boggsThe next Digital Pragmata panel is tomorrow, Wednesday, October 5, 2016: “Framing the Digital.” Jeremy Boggs, who will speak at this event, is Design Architect at the Scholars’ Lab, focusing on front-end development, user interface, user experience, and aesthetics. He is currently researching methods for doing distant reading of comic books using computer vision. He has been a practicing digital humanist for a little over a decade, holds a Master’s degree in History, and has taught courses in history, graphic design, new media, and American studies. He serves as the Communication Officer for the Association for Computers and the Humanities.


Please join us on October 5, 2016 from 12:00 noon to 1:30 PM in the James Branch Cabell Library, Multipurpose Room (Room 250). The event is free and open to the public, but please register. If you attend and find yourself eager for more, stay for an informal working session at 2:00 in the same location, and take part in a collaborative Publishing Makerspace.

Parking is available for a fee in the West Broad StreetWest Main Street and West Cary Street parking decks. If special accommodations are needed or to register by phone, please call Gregory Kimbrell, events and programs coordinator, at (804) 828-0593 prior to April 26.

Meet Greg Crawford

greg crawford headshotThe next Digital Pragmata panel is coming this Wednesday, October 5, 2016: “Framing the Digital.” Greg Crawford, who will speak at this event, is a native of Alabama. He is a graduate of Auburn University where he received a B.A. and M.A. in History. Greg was hired as a Local Records Archivist at the Library of Virginia in 1999 to process local court records, mainly chancery causes. He is currently the Local Records Services Program Manager responsible for managing the processing of local circuit court records and the Circuit Records Preservation grants program.


Please join us on October 5, 2016 from 12:00 noon to 1:30 PM in the James Branch Cabell Library, Multipurpose Room (Room 250). The event is free and open to the public, but please register. If you attend and find yourself eager for more, stay for an informal working session at 2:00 in the same location, and take part in a collaborative Publishing Makerspace.

Parking is available for a fee in the West Broad StreetWest Main Street and West Cary Street parking decks. If special accommodations are needed or to register by phone, please call Gregory Kimbrell, events and programs coordinator, at (804) 828-0593 prior to April 26.

Meet Kathy Jordan

kathy jordan, lvaThe next Digital Pragmata panel is coming October 5, 2016: “Framing the Digital.” Kathy Jordan, who will speak at this event, joined the Library of Virginia in 2000, after receiving her MA in history from Lehigh University and her MLS from Rutgers University. Hired as a Research Archivist, Kathy became the Library’s first Electronic Records Archivist in 2004. Currently, as a member of the Information Technology division, she serves as the agency’s Digital Initiatives & Web Services Manager, leading a team devoted to the Library’s web presence and digital collection management efforts.


Please join us on October 5, 2016 from 12:00 noon to 1:30 PM in the James Branch Cabell Library, Multipurpose Room (Room 250). The event is free and open to the public, but please register. If you attend and find yourself eager for more, stay for an informal working session at 2:00 in the same location, and take part in a collaborative Publishing Makerspace.

Parking is available for a fee in the West Broad StreetWest Main Street and West Cary Street parking decks. If special accommodations are needed or to register by phone, please call Gregory Kimbrell, events and programs coordinator, at (804) 828-0593 prior to April 26.

Upcoming panel discussion: Framing the digital

dp logoWelcome back to another year of Digital Pragmata! This year we are focusing on “seeing data,” and what it means to make content visible. How do we foreground the narrative of digital projects? How do we make data make sense? How do digital project interfaces embody the stories that they are designed to tell?

Our panelists will be Jeremy Boggs, Design Architect, Scholar’s Lab, University of Virginia; Greg Crawford, Local Records Services Program Manager, Library of Virginia; Kathy Jordan, Digital Initiatives & Web Services Manager, Library of Virginia.

Please join us on October 5, 2016 from 12:00 noon to 1:30 PM in the James Branch Cabell Library, Multipurpose Room (Room 250). The event is free and open to the public, but please register. If you attend and find yourself eager for more, stay for an informal working session at 2:00 in the same location, and take part in a collaborative Publishing Makerspace.

Parking is available for a fee in the West Broad StreetWest Main Street and West Cary Street parking decks. If special accommodations are needed or to register by phone, please call Gregory Kimbrell, events and programs coordinator, at (804) 828-0593 prior to April 26.

Getting to Know Robert K. Nelson

 

robert nelson u of r dslThe next Digital Pragmata panel is coming April 28, 2016: “Print+Web 2: Texts, Publishers, Books.” Last week you met Robert K. Nelson, the director of the University of Richmond’s Digital Scholarship Lab. Would you like to learn more about what this panelist does?

UR’s interactive historical mapping project earns national distinction,” from RVANews, April 2016.

Meet the (Digital) Historian: An Interview with Robert Nelson,” from Erstwhile: A History Blog, September 2014.

Of Monsters, Men, – and Topic Modeling,” from The New York Times, May 2011.


Please join us on April 28, 2016 from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in the James Branch Cabell Library, Lecture Hall (Room 303). The event is free and open to the public, but please register.

Parking is available for a fee in the West Broad StreetWest Main Street and West Cary Street parking decks. If special accommodations are needed or to register by phone, please call Gregory Kimbrell, events and programs coordinator, at (804) 828-0593 prior to April 26.

Meet Robert K. Nelson

 

robert nelson u of r dslThe next Digital Pragmata panel is coming April 28, 2016: “Print+Web 2: Texts, Publishers, Books.” Robert K. Nelson, who will speak at this event, is director of the Digital Scholarship Lab and affiliated faculty in the American Studies Program at the University of Richmond. He has authored, directed, or edited digital humanities projects including American Panorama (for which he was just named one of The Chronicle of Higher Education‘s 2016 Tech Innovators), “Mining the Dispatch,” an enhanced edition of the Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States, and “Redlining Richmond.” He writes and teaches on antislavery and slavery in the nineteenth-century United States.


Please join us on April 28, 2016 from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in the James Branch Cabell Library, Lecture Hall (Room 303). The event is free and open to the public, but please register.

Parking is available for a fee in the West Broad StreetWest Main Street and West Cary Street parking decks. If special accommodations are needed or to register by phone, please call Gregory Kimbrell, events and programs coordinator, at (804) 828-0593 prior to April 26.

Upcoming panel discussion: Print+Web 2: Texts, Publishers, Books

At this latest installment of the Digital Pragmata series, panelists explore authorship and content in online publishing. How do we represent the best of print in the digital environment? How does digital publishing fit with the traditions and history of publishing? Claire Bourne, assistant professor in the VCU Department of English, moderates. Our panelists will be James Jenkins, Publisher, Valancourt Books; Gita Manaktala, Editorial Director, MIT Press; Robert Nelson, Director, University of Richmond Digital Scholarship Lab. A reception will follow the event.

Please join us on April 28, 2016 from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in the James Branch Cabell Library, Lecture Hall (Room 303). The event is free and open to the public, but please register.

Parking is available for a fee in the West Broad StreetWest Main Street and West Cary Street parking decks. If special accommodations are needed or to register by phone, please call Gregory Kimbrell, events and programs coordinator, at (804) 828-0593 prior to April 26.

“Past, Present, and Future Ideas for Digital Projects: A Discussion Examining Triumphs, Tribulations and Applications of the Interactive 1889 Baist Atlas of Richmond, VA”

This spring’s Digital Pragmata programming continues next week with a brown bag entitled “Past, Present, and Future Ideas for Digital Projects: A Discussion Examining Triumphs, Tribulations and Applications of the Interactive 1889 Baist Atlas of Richmond, VA” from Lauren Work. Please come to Cabell Library Room 250 at 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 1st. Bring your lunch! Chips, cookies and drinks will be provided. Here are a few words from Lauren about her talk…

Grand project ideas. We all have them, and I was fortunate to be able to embark on a collaborative digital project in my first few months at VCU. I will present my experience and lessons learned regarding the development, launch, reception and future of the interactive Baist Atlas of Richmond, VA site. We will then open the floor for discussion of digital projects ranging from humanities to archives to innovative media and how we might scope, collaborate, produce and think about these projects at VCU in the future.

Lauren Work headshotLauren Work joined VCU Libraries in 2014 as Digital Collections Librarian. She earned her Master’s in Library and Information Science at the University of Washington in 2012, and her B.S. in Environmental Geology and Environmental Science at The College of William and Mary in 2004. Previously she has worked at the PBS Media Library at the Library of Congress, at National Public Radio, and in Special Collections at University of Washington Libraries. 2011-2012. She has presented on her work in various venues, including last year in the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) Digital Dialogues series.

Coming in April: the Future in Four Dimensions

Digital pragmata flourish at the nexus of research, teaching, and creativity. They can be textual databases, creative visualizations of information, multimedia explorations, collaboratively annotated maps, and a thousand other projects.

  • How does our choice of creative tools impact the representation of time?
  • What are the current trends in art and scholarship focusing on time?
  • What does it mean for us to say that we are talking about time, and how does our culture inform that understanding?

Please join us April 20 from 2:00 p.m to 4:30 p.m. at The Depot (814 W. Broad Street) for a conversation on the subject of time among dynamic practitioners in the arts and humanities: Wayne Graham, Samantha Hill, and Ann VanderMeer, moderated by John Glover.

Doors open at 1:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public, but please register. Parking is available for a fee in the West Broad StreetWest Main Street and West Cary Street parking decks. If special accommodations are needed or to register by phone, please call Gregory Kimbrell, events and programs coordinator, at (804) 828-0593 prior to April 17.

The panelists:

headshot, Wayne Graham

Wayne Graham is head of the Scholars’ Lab Research and Development team. He holds an MA in history from the College of William and Mary and his BA in history from the Virginia Military Institute.

Before joining the Scholars’ Lab in 2009, he worked at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s Department of Historical Research, then as a systems administrator and programmer at William and Mary’s Earl Gregg Swem Library. Over the course of those years, he worked as a historical researcher, TEI specialist, web developer, and systems architect, dabbling in computer graphics, high-performance computing, and emerging-technologies coordination.

Wayne is an advocate of open-source software, having worked on many projects over the course of his career. Some of the more notable projects include MyCroft, VuFind, SolrMarc, and Blacklight. More recently, he has contributed the many repositories in Github, as well as the numerous Scholars’ Lab projects there.

Having mentored many Digital Humanities and Praxis Fellows over the last several years in software development, he has also taught at the Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching Institute, as well as written a couple books on developing applications using the Facebook APIs.

As a “full-stack” developer, Wayne’s technical expertise is in web application languages, systems design, and technical training for humanities-based research questions. His research interests include public humanities, augmented and virtual reality, photogrammetry, and scholarly interface design.

headshot, Samantha HillSamantha Hill is a transdisciplinary artist from Chicago, IL, with an emphasis on archives, oral-story collecting, social projects, and art facilitations. Hill creates multimedia installations and performances within historic buildings, landmarks, and public locations. She received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and her BFA from Moore College of Art and Design.

Hill participated in residencies, exhibitions, and public projects for several venues including the Hyde Park Art Center, the McColl Center for Visual Art and Innovation, the Museum of Contemporary Photography Cornerstone Gallery, the Glass Curtain Gallery at Columbia College, and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture at the University of Chicago. Her work is documented in several publications including the Chicago Tribune, Philadelphia Inquire, Time Out Chicago, and WBEZ 90.1 Chicago Public Radio. Hill’s work is also featured in the book Problematizing Public Pedagogy, published by Routledge Press.

She received several honors including the International Sculpture Center Award in 2006 and 2008, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago Trustee Merit Scholarship in Sculpture, and the Philadelphia Sculptors Award. Hill received a nomination for a 3Arts Award in the Teaching Artist category in 2014.

Learn more about Samantha Hill’s methodology at her website.

headshot, Ann VanderMeerAnn VanderMeer is the founder of the award-winning Buzzcity Press. She was the editor-in-chief for Weird Tales (the oldest fantasy magazine in the world) for five years, during which time she was nominated three times for the Hugo Award, winning one. She has been nominated for the Shirley Jackson award and won the British Fantasy Award as well as the World Fantasy Award. Work from her press has won the British Fantasy Award, the International Rhysling Award, and the IHG Award and has appeared in several year’s best anthologies. She currently works as a Contributing Fiction Editor at Tor.com.

Ann has partnered with her husband, author Jeff VanderMeer, on such editing projects as the World Fantasy Award winning Leviathan series, Best American Fantasy, The Thackery T. Lambshead Pocket Guide to Eccentric & Discredited Diseases, The New Weird, Steampunk, Steampunk II: Steampunk Reloaded, Last Drink Bird Head, and Fast Ships, Black Sails. She has also written a humor book, The Kosher Guide to Imaginary Animals. Her latest anthology projects include The Thackery T. Lambshead Cabinet of Curiosities (Harper/Voyager July 2011) and The Weird: A Compendium of Dark and Strange Stories (Atlantic/Corvus UK November 2011) as well as Steampunk III: Steampunk Revolution (Tachyon Dec 2012) and The Time Traveler’s Almanac (Macmillan/Tor March 2014). Upcoming in 2015 is Sisters of the Revolution (PM Press) and Beyond the Bandersnatch: A Modern Bestiary of Untrue Tales (Centipede Press).

Ann and Jeff started Cheeky Frawg, an ebook publishing company, in early 2011, which is currently publishing the new semi-annual anthology series ODD? as well as many other titles, including many translated works. She has also taught many writing workshops, including Yale University Writer’s Conference, Clarion, Odyssey, and Shared Worlds (teen writing camp) as well conducted creativity seminars for such varied audiences as the librarians of the state of Arizona and Blizzard Entertainment. She has been profiled/interviewed for WIRED.Com, National NPR, and The Weather Channel.

Ann lives with her husband Jeff and three cats in Tallahassee, Florida. See www.weirdfictionreview.com for her most recent adventures.

The moderator:

headshot, John GloverJohn Glover is the Humanities Research Librarian at VCU Libraries. He holds a B.A. in History and a B.A. in Latin from the University of Washington, an M.A. in History from the Ohio State University, and an M.L.I.S. from the University of Washington. His current research considers literary networks and the research practices of creative writers. He publishes fiction and non-fiction as J.T. Glover in anthologies and magazines, and he serves on the Board of Directors of James River Writers. He co-leads VCU’s Digital Humanities and Digital Studies Working Group and directs Digital Pragmata.