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Political Science Product Trial: World Politics Review

VCU Libraries offers trials of a potential new product in the political science discipline.

World Politics Review provides uncompromising analysis of critical global trends to give academics, policymakers and business people the context they need to have the confidence they want. Written by leading experts and on-the-ground influencers, World Politics Review’s substantive content offers comprehensive and detailed perspectives.

The content in World Politics Review is much more current than that found in leading international affairs academic journals. World Politics Review includes multiple areas of study, with thousands of articles in its archives and more than 75,000 words of original content produced each month. This robust and authoritative database covers topics of key relevance to foreign policy, international politics and foreign Affairs. Trial dates: Oct. 1 – Dec. 1, 2018.

Try World Politics Review

By Nia Rodgers, public affairs research librarian

 

Peace Research Abstracts: Security and conflicts

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Peace Research Abstracts is published by the Peace Research Institute in Ontario, Canada. It covers public affairs, security and conflict resolution. An Ebsco database, it is easy to use for beginning and advanced researchers. Thousands of international journals are indexed, from Journal of Conflict Resolution to Global Governance to Peace Economics. Abstracts date back to 1964.

Sample search terms:

  • international peacekeeping
  • conflict management
  • human rights
  • vulnerable populations
  • elections
  • disarmament

Some topics may be best searched with quotes around phrases, such as:

  • “economics and peace ”
  • “criminal justice system and peace”
  • “gender and peace”
  • “nuclear zero”

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by Nia Rodgers, public affairs research librarian

Image: Peace Baby!!!, resized and cropped, Clyde Robinson, flickr, creative commons

Access World News: New and current media

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Access World News contains materials from 9,688 sources spanning 160 countries, 1978 to the present. Content includes newspapers, newswires, journals, broadcast transcripts and videos. Searching can be limited to:

  • Country, state and territory, region, province or city
  • Decade, year, month, day, era or presidential era
  • Language

In addition to searching, users can use the Find a Topic feature to browse by topic. Twelve broad subject areas are broken down into lists of popular and current interest topics. Clicking a topic acts as a user-friendly starting point for related search terms.

Access World News also provides a “quick access” style list of special reports and hot topics. These items gather news reports of breaking events and popular social and cultural topics for ease of access. Users can find these lists under “Other Products” in the upper left corner of the search screen.

Coverage of the Richmond Times-Dispatch may be of particular interest to local scholars. The Richmond Times-Dispatch is covered from 1985–present. Additionally, Richmond Times-Dispatch blogs are covered from 2006–present. The Collegian from the University of Richmond (2007–current) and the Commonwealth Times from VCU (2003–current) are also indexed.

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By Stephani Rodgers, liaison to Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness

Image: Access World News

Governmentattic.org: FOIA requested docs posted online

 

FOIA

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Governmentattic.org is a non-commercial website that provides electronic copies of Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) inquiries. The documents on the website were obtained legally, following the FOIA rules. Each document has an identified source. The site is funded by the site owners, and receives no outside funding. Governmentattic.org is organized into 11 categories, including Department of Justice documents, FBI documents, Legislative Agencies, Government Corporations and State Records. From the FBI records regarding Ike Turner and alleged check passing to files regarding electronic surveillance at the Department of Justice, there is something to interest everyone.

If you are curious about how many requests are fulfilled and denied, you might be interested in the data from foia.gov.  This site also explains the process for filing a FOIA request.

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By Stephani Rodgers, Liaison for Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness

iPOLL: Comprehensive U.S. data from 1935 to today

iPoll (2)

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Drawn from every major polling organization in the United States, iPOLL offers comprehensive and up-to-date national and some international public opinion poll data. With more than 650,000 questions and answers dating to 1935, users can find public opinions on a variety of topics.

The database offers useful search features, including keyword, topic, organization and dates and also searching within a set of question results. iPOLL contains polling data on public policy issues ranging from elections to social security to religious status.

Special note may be made of the Topics at a Glance feature. Users may choose from a variety of topics found in the headlines, utilizing the pre-populated datasets, charts and issue briefs to get a quick overview of public opinion.

iPool is managed by The Roper Center for Public Opinion Research, currently located at the University of Connecticut. According to its website: “It is one of the world’s leading archives of social science data, specializing in data from public opinion surveys. The Center’s mission is to collect, preserve, and disseminate public opinion data; to serve as a resource to help improve the practice of survey research; and to broaden the understanding of public opinion through the use of survey data in the United States and abroad. Founded in 1947, the Roper Center holds data ranging from the 1930s, when survey research was in its infancy, to the present. Its collection now includes over 22,000 datasets and adds hundreds more each year. In total, the archive contains responses from millions of individuals on a vast range of topics. …  The Roper Center has a strong presence in the public opinion community and maintains cooperative relationships with other archives around the world. Its Board of Directors contains representatives from both academic and commercial public opinion research.”

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Image: Creative Commons

by Nia Rodgers

Grey Literature: Resources beyond the library

“Public policy work increasingly relies on a wide range of resources — some are traditional scholarly publications, but the majority are ‘grey literature’. Reports, discussion papers, briefings, reviews and data sets produced by government, academic centres, NGOs, think tanks and companies are heavily used and highly valued in policy and practice work, forming a key part of the evidence base” (Lawrence, Houghton, Thomas & Weldon, 2014, p. 3).

Grey literature is academic work that is not published by commercial publishers. Examples include fact sheets, pre-prints, white papers, proceedings, patents, standards, newsletters, patents, bulletins, symposia, some surveys, some maps, and scholarly materials published in open access journals. With the rise of the internet, self-publishing has brought grey literature to researchers all over the world in a more timely fashion than traditional publishing. See this paper for more discussion on the value of grey literature: Find It

With the increase of electronic publishing opportunities, digitization efforts and emerging technologies, grey literature is now more available and more in demand by growing user communities.

by Nia Rodgers

Image: Grey Literature