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Trip Pro: Free trial to July 21

VCU Libraries has secured a free trial of Trip Pro database. This free trial will last through July 21.To help VCU Libraries determine whether or not we should subscribe to the Pro version of Trip, please send your feedback to gaukh@vcu.eduThe Trip Database is designed to find answers to clinical questions using the best available evidence. TripPro offers these enhancements compared to the free version.

More content

  • More than 100,000 extra systematic reviews;
  • Millions of extra free full-text articles
  • Easily searchable 175,000 ongoing clinical trials
  • Access to a massive database of medical images
  • Access to tens of thousands of clinical videos

More functionality

  • Export of records to reference management software
  • Advanced search
  • Ability to filter results by clinical area
  • Article views, see which articles are most popular for your search

Other features

  • No advertisements
  • Discounts on evidence services provided by the Trip Evidence Service
  • Be the first to benefit from new features added to Trip

Communal effort creates access to rare ms.

On Friday afternoon, April 7, Transcribathoners gathered in the lecture hall of Cabell Library. A Transcriba-what? 

Transcribathons are organized by the Folger Shakespeare Library: Think of it as crowd-sourcing to decipher the handwriting of early modern manuscripts. Co-sponsored with the Folger Shakespeare Library, the VCU Department of English, the VCU Humanities Research Center and VCU Libraries, the Transcribathon provided hands-on digital humanities work—moving forward the Folger project to provide readable transcriptions of rare manuscripts in their collections via an open-access database for global access by researchers and students of this pivotal era in history (http://emmo.folger.edu/).

Handwriting from this period followed a variety of forms, including the prominent “Secretary’s Hand,” which may seem to our eyes ornate and often somewhat unreadable. And yet this kind of detective work is extremely popular—especially at VCU, which has the honor of being the only university to host a Transcribathon twice!

her photos are available on the library Flickr site.

Games: Focusing on artistic and cultural value

Always working to meet faculty and student needs, VCU Libraries collects video games that have significant artistic and cultural value to meet the growing interest of students and faculty in the fields of animation, multimedia, digital worlds and gaming. The impetus of the collection, which started with 11 games, came from a faculty request to add both board and digital games to support a course.

The early collection (2014) features games across various platforms, and additional new releases are expected to be added soon. The games in the collection include critically acclaimed titles such as “Journey,” “Flower,” “The Last of Us,” “Shadow of the Colossus,” “Katamari Damacy,” “BioShock” and “Child of Eden.”

In 2015–16, the libraries began to collect games only available as downloads — important for representation of smaller, independent game developers. “Never Alone” and “Firewatch” are two significant titles. Also new is an “Alienware” gaming PC. This super powerful computer is located in The Workshop. A diverse collection of a dozen games includes “Papers Please” and “That Dragon Cancer.” These works are catalogued and they appear in library records, only for in-house use. This is significant because many libraries avoid downloads, which limits the collection parameters, or they don’t catalog games and instead rely on a finding aid. VCU Libraries catalogers developed creative, flexible workflows to manage these new-age materials.

“There’s a great interest in video games and virtual worlds in the School of the Arts and across the campus,” said Arts Collections Librarian Emily Davis Winthrop. “Gaming is emerging as a key area of research. We hope that this collection will support the growing research interests of our patrons and provide inspiration for the many creative endeavors occurring across campus.”

“We are purchasing games for research, teaching and learning — not necessarily for entertainment,” Davis Winthrop said. “We’re looking for games that have certain aesthetics, that are important to the history of video games and that have significant artistic direction, unique narrative or cerebral gameplay.”

ABOUT THE GAMING ROOM

The library’s Innovative Media department provides hardware support for the gaming collection and game developers in a dedicated gaming and group viewing room in The Workshop. Six video game consoles — Sony’s PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 2; Microsoft’s Xbox One and Xbox 360 and the Nintendo Wii U — provide users with the means to explore a wide range of game worlds. For computer-based games, the room is equipped with a high-end Alienware Area 51 gaming PC with gaming keyboard and mouse. Games and videos are displayed on a 47-inch, high-definition, 3D-capable LED monitor, and sound is supported by an LG wi-fi streaming sound bar with wireless subwoofer. Users reserve time in the room through an online scheduling system, checkout games and components at the information desk and seek help from knowledgeable staff about hardware, software and game play.

Collections of Distinction: Current focus areas

The “Collections of Distinction” initiative focuses on expanding and improving collections that provide crucial and unique materials for teaching, research, discovery and enjoyment.

Collections of Distinction exemplify VCU’s mission to inspire and foster creative ideas that celebrate diversity, inclusiveness and engagement on campus and beyond. Supporting established or emerging areas of research, Collections of Distinction receive funds to strengthen knowledge in the identified areas — with the goal of elevating them to national and international stature. At the fundamental level, however, they support and foster teaching, research and discovery by VCU’s faculty and students.

Current Collections of Distinction

  • Economic Botany/Medicinal Plants
  • Experimental Digital Animation
  • Forensic Science
  • Leadership Education
  • Poetry
  • Special Education and Disability Policy
  • Traumatic Brain Injury

Want to know more or discuss the Collections of Distinction program at VCU Libraries? Contact Karen Cary, head, Collection Analysis and Investment.

CRL: Vast, rare, global primary sources

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VCU Libraries’ new membership in the Center for Research Libraries opens vast, rare, global primary sources to VCU.

The Center for Research Libraries (CRL) is an international consortium of more than 200 university, college and independent research libraries. Founded in 1949, the center supports original research and teaching in the humanities, sciences and social sciences. It preserves and makes available to scholars a wealth of rare and uncommon primary source materials from all world regions. After a hiatus of many years, VCU Libraries is again a member of CRL.

The diversity, global scope and primary evidence materials contained in CRL enable groundbreaking faculty and student research. Among its vast collections and digital resources is the largest circulating collection of newspapers in North America, including more than 1,800 U.S. ethnic titles and some of the earliest African-American papers. Researchers benefit from 38,000 foreign journals and 800,000-plus foreign dissertations, major microfilm and paper collections from Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, Europe, South Asia, and more.

Areas of distinction include:

  • Broad collections in the area of primary legal and government resources, with an emphasis on serial publications from central governments including legislative, administrative, financial, and statistical reports. CRL holds several hundred thousand volumes of publications from government agencies of more than 100 countries, including more than 1,750 official gazettes.
  • Holdings of more than 500,000 volumes of monographic and serial publications of U.S. state government agencies and legislatures from the earliest period through 1950, including financial reports and research studies.
  • Rich historical holdings of U.S. and foreign scientific and technical publications. Generally, its collections in science, technology and engineering emphasizes titles not commonly held by other major North American research libraries.
  • Many specialized groups of materials, including a reference book archive, college and university catalogs, primary and secondary textbooks, railroad publications, curriculum guides and foreign central bank publications. Also held are major microform sets in literature, art, theater, music, science, and other fields.

How to use Center for Research Libraries materials

Discover items by using the CRL Catalog or the link to Digital Collections

The Center for Research Libraries is also listed in the A-Z databases list. Physical items may be requested using VCU Interlibrary Loan services. Contact Shirley Thomas, srthomas@vcu.edu, (804) 828-1706 with questions. For more detailed information, please see the CRL Research Guide. 

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Stubbins: U.S. municipal buildings postcards

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Researchers studying planning, history, architecture and similar subjects that involve built environments now have a new national resource. The Stubbins Collection of U.S. County Courthouse and Municipal Building Postcards has been digitized and is now freely available online.

The collection features U.S. county courthouses and other municipal buildings such as town halls and city halls. The postcards represent every state except for North Carolina. Many of the buildings depicted were built  in the late 19th or early 20th century. Some no longer exist. The collection documents various architectural styles. Browsing the collection, you can find clock towers aplenty (Springfield, Mass., Springfield, Ohio, Lincoln, Neb. and more). You’ll find public buildings hundreds of miles apart that resemble each other. (Take a look at Richmond, Va.’s city hall and that of Grand Rapids, Mich.) Domes, columns, soaring arches are typical features of these turn-of-the-century governmental cathedrals.

The postcards also illustrate the various state government structures. Many states have at least two tiers of local government, counties and municipalities (village, town, city, and borough), but some have unique governing structures. For example, the Commonwealth of Virginia has 95 counties and 38 independent cities. In most states, cities are part of the county government.

This collection was amassed by James F. Stubbins, who taught pharmaceutical chemistry for 34 years at the School of Pharmacy, Virginia Commonwealth University. Born in Honolulu in 1931, his family was living in the Philippines when Pearl Harbor was bombed in 1941. Stubbins, along with his mother and brother moved to Denver to live with family until the war ended. When he was 14 the family moved to Las Vegas. Stubbins earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Nevada at Reno in 1953 and then served in the Army. He earned a master’s degree in organic chemistry from Purdue University in 1958 and a doctorate in medicinal chemistry in 1965 from the University of Minnesota. Stubbins joined the faculty of the Medical College of Virginia (now VCU) in 1963 as an assistant professor of pharmaceutical chemistry. Among the faculty, he was well known for his boxes of index cards on which he recorded the details of every scientific paper he read. Stubbins retired from VCU in 1996 and was granted emeritus professor status.

An avid postcard collector, he began the hobby as a young man. He was a founding member of the Old Dominion Postcard Club, formed in Richmond in 1978. Stubbins died on April 22, 2009. His family made a gift of his collection to Special Collections and Archives, James Branch Cabell Library in 2010.

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By Sue Robinson, director of communication and public relations. For more information about this resource or others

Image: Talladega County Court House, Talladega, Alabama, VCU Libraries Special Collections and Archives

Collections Profile: Kevin Farley

Kevin FarleyCollection librarians advise on acquisitions and materials to support teaching and research as well as new course and degree development.
Humanities Collections Librarian Kevin Farley serves the VCU Department of Music.

Schools and Departments Served: African-American Studies, English, History, World Studies (including Philosophy, Religious Studies, and world languages), MATX, Music

Expertise/education:

  • Ph.D., English, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
  • MLS, Library Science, UNC-Chapel Hill
  • MA, English, Kent State University
  • BA, English, Old Dominion University

Areas of Interest

  • The future of humanities publishing
  • Cultural theory
  • Digital Humanities
  • Shakespeare
  • World literature and translation studies
  • Poetry and poetics
  • Film studies and experimental film
  • Music history

What do you like most about what you do?

Collections are at the forefront of tremendous changes underway in academic libraries, reflecting the transformations taking place in how disciplines are taught, studied and practiced. This is challenging but also very exciting, and with the increasing role of digital collections, it’s possible to see researchers find connections that are now often more visible than ever before. The variety of ways of thinking about oneself and the world that is the foundation of doing the humanities has been my lifelong fascination. Creation in the humanities is especially vibrant at VCU. Contemporary humanities are diverse, inclusive and internationalist in thinking and approach, and to be part of that is fulfilling both professionally and personally.

What currently has your attention?

At work, the shift into digital environments for media access, and ways to provide dynamic and wide-ranging streaming access to the VCU community. At home, the intricacies of the classical guitar, which I am determined to learn.

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Collection librarians like Farley work in collaboration with outreach librarians, who support research, curricular and information literacy. More about other outreach librarians for the arts: Creative Catalysts: VCU’s arts librarians

History in Your Hands: A digitized Dickinson letter

Emily_DickinsonFinding aid

A 17-word letter from poet Emily Dickinson to a neighbor is now widely available to researchers through a new “History in Your Hands” exhibit in the online VCU Libraries Gallery.

Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) lived most of her life in the family home in Amherst, Mass. She lived quietly. While often identified as a recluse, Dickinson kept close relations through correspondence, which often included poems.

The VCU Libraries letter was written to Mrs. Henry F. (Adelaide Spencer) Hills, the wife of  a businessman. The Hills family had their summer home in Amherst. Adelaide was a frequent correspondent with her neighbor, Emily. After Mrs. Hills’ death in 1910, the letter passed into the hands of her children, specifically her daughter Susan Clapp Hills Skillings, and then to Susan’s heirs. The letter was purchased for the VCU Libraries in 1972 by The James Branch Cabell Library Associates Board. It is the only Dickinson letter VCU Libraries holds.

Like much of Dickinson’s correspondence, this letter is a brief note, written in pencil. Thomas H. Johnson, who published the authoritative work of Dickinson letters, identifies this as letter #614 with a possible publication date of 1879. Prior to the letter’s recent digitization and online publication, it was known only to scholars through transcriptions. Because of its fragility, access to the letter is restricted. Permission to view the original must be granted by the head of Special Collections and Archives. Inquire at the reading room desk or send an email to libjbcsca@vcu.edu.

If you’re interested in learning more about the poet and her work, the Emily Dickinson Museum offers many resources related to Emily Dickinson and to Dickinson scholarship. The two major collections for Emily Dickinson’s manuscripts and family papers are Amherst College and Harvard University.

* * *

About the History in Your Hands series of exhibits:

Every archival collection holds a story. Manuscripts and artifacts bear witness to past events, but only a careful researcher can piece together the facts of history and reveal the narrative within the collection. VCU Libraries Special Collections and Archives houses many fascinating primary source materials that wait for inquisitive minds to study them. History in Your Hands exhibits present featured manuscript collections that we believe merit further research. Only when you take “history in your hands” can you begin the process that will allow the full story to be shared.

If you have any questions or comments regarding these materials or this exhibition, please contact the Special Collections and Archives staff in James Branch Cabell Library.

Finding aid

Image:  Emily Dickinson. Daguerreotype. ca. 1847 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. This image is in the public domain. Amherst College Archives & Special Collections is the home of the original.

Portals to the Past: 1898 catalog offers RVA design details

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The newest addition to VCU Libraries’ digital collections featuring architectural elements of the American South is a catalog of doors, windows, mantels and sashes for 1880s buildings.

Thomas E. Stagg was a 19th century Richmond, Va. firm and manufacturer of sashes, blinds and doors for the construction of homes and businesses. Operations were run out of an office and storage space at 1444 E. Main St.

This 1898 “vest-pocket” edition of the Stagg catalog–likely intended to be used on building sites–includes order instructions, price lists and measurements. The Digital Collections catalog is searchable and has hundreds of detailed images of window sashes, doors, columns, mantles, corner and plinth blocks available from the Stagg company.

Many of these architectural and decorative elements are seen throughout Richmond’s historic private and commercial buildings.

According to window restorer and woodworker Dixon Kerr in an article, “How to Copy Vintage Millwork” posted on the Old House Authority website, Richmond was an area prominent in the manufacture of millwork sold throughout the United States. Kerr writes: “In the late 1880s there were approximately a dozen such businesses in Richmond with 30 to 50  employees: Thomas E. Stagg, at 1421 Cary St.; J.J. Montague, at the corner of 9th and Arch Streets; Hare and Tucker, at 2318 Main St.; Whitehurst and Owen, at Byrd and 10th Streets; DuVal & Robertson, at 11th and Porter and 7th & Hull Streets; and Binswanger & Company, at 1427 E. Main St. Binswanger, now a commercial glass company, is still in business; Siewer’s Lumber Company and Ruffin and Payne, still in business, were also in business at the time. Beckstoffer & Son continued in the business until the early 21st century.”

Copyright

Materials in this collection are in the public domain, and thus are free of any copyright restriction. Please acknowledge VCU Libraries if any of the materials are used.

Additional Research Information

The print catalog is housed in Special Collections and Archives at James Branch Cabell Library. For more information, see the catalog record. Please direct reference and research inquires to libjbcsca@vcu.edu or call (804) 828-1108.

Image: Cottage Doors, page 55, Thomas E. Stagg catalog

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New Web of Science Databases: Expanded resources

VCU Libraries in 2015 expanded its access to Web of Science (WOS) databases with the addition of new titles and backfile coverage for existing titles.

Compiled by Lynne Turman, head of collections, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences and Ibironke Lawal, engineering and special collections librarian

Image: Creative Commons

VCU Bulletin: Available online

Shafer Court students group

The bible for students, the new VCU Bulletin is available in an updated website. The undergraduate, graduate and professional bulletins contain information about university policies, course descriptions and academic requirements for the programs available to the respective student populations. Visit bulletin.vcu.edu to view the 2015-16 edition on its new site.
One of the tabs on the site links to archives of bulletins housed in VCU Libraries’ Scholars Compass. These archives are useful to alumni and faculty.
Old bulletins, also called catalogs, and course descriptions are available on this archives site as PDF files. The electronic files of the bulletins from 1998 forward were transferred to the University Archives beginning in 2015. VCU Bulletins from the founding of the university, 1968 through 1998, are also available on this site as PDF files. The archived copy of each bulletin reflects all policies and procedures in effect at the beginning of the stated academic year. Printed copies of the VCU Bulletin from 1968 through 2003 are available in Special Collections and Archives at VCU Libraries.
Image: Shafer Court students group, VCU Bulletin

Book Citation Index: Books and publications connections

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A powerful new tool allows researchers and scholars to identify connections between books and other forms of scholarly publications. The Book Citation Index (BCI) is now part of  VCU Libraries’ subscription to Web of Science and includes information on more than 30,000 books in the social sciences, humanities and sciences.

BCI tracks the number of times books and book chapters are cited by journals, conference proceedings and other books. It also includes the cited references of the original book or chapter.

Users can click the Get It@VCU button to search for a book at VCU Libraries. Books from a variety of commercial and university presses, including Wiley, University of Chicago and Oxford University Press, start with publication year 2005.  More than 10,000 books are selectively added each year based on well-defined criteria.

Authors from VCU have over 700 items already included in BCI. Alerts can be created to track VCU authors or analyze custom data based on a search set. Explore the Book Citation Index and learn more about this tool.

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By Sue Robinson, director of communication and public relations. For more information about this resource or others

Image: Book Citation Index Website

Historic Fulton: Online oral history project

Fulton_slider

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VCU Libraries announces the next stage in telling an important and little-known story of the once-vibrant Historic Fulton community that fell victim to 1970s urban renewal.

The Historic Fulton Oral History Project is now digital. Transcripts are searchable. Audio files that literally give these accounts voices are also available.

“We are very excited to partner with The Valentine and the Historic Fulton community to make this important collection accessible online,” said Lauren Work, VCU Libraries digital collections librarian.

The physical neighborhood of Historic Fulton, a venerable history-rich section of Richmond that had declined into blight and slum-like conditions, was razed in the early ‘70s. Gone were some 800 houses and businesses. While the physical neighborhood was lost, emotional ties to the East End community remain strong. The oral histories capture memories, observations, facts and, for some, sadness and outrage at what was taken from Historic Fulton residents.

The team that initiated the oral history project was The Valentine, the Neighborhood Resource Center (NRC), Virginia Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC), and the Greater Fulton’s Future Legacy Committee (GFF). The project was funded by a grant from Virginia LISC and is part of the Greater Fulton’s Future Plan. At its onset, Veronica Fleming, then Virginia LISC senior program officer, said theoral history project would be a model for other community documentation efforts nationwide. “Neighborhood revitalization is not just about bricks and mortar projects. It is also about preserving history and creating pride in communities.”

The project was spearheaded by former Valentine curator Suzanne Savery. During 2011 and 2012, Caroline Morris, then a College of William & Mary history doctoral student, and Project Coordinator Corliss Freda Johnson interviewed current and former residents of Historic Fulton.

“Finally, we have a chance to share our story. Fulton is gone and this project will keep it alive,” reflected Johnson.

The Historic Fulton Oral History collection contains 17 interviews with 32 named interviewees, teachers, activists, clergy and community leaders who grew up in the predominantly African-American community in the 1930s through 1950s. The interviewees also witnessed the death of Historic Fulton through Richmond’s urban renewal efforts.

The collection presents the unique perspectives of these residents. As Historic Fulton undergoes more change with the pending arrival of the Stone Brewery in Rocketts, oral history participant the Rev. Mary Perez reflects, “Historic Fulton as we knew it, lived and loved it, was taken, but our memories will never be taken away.”

The Valentine is the repository for the project and holds copyrights. Physical copies of the oral history transcripts have been distributed to various research institutions in the Richmond region, including James Branch Cabell Library’s Special Collections and Archives. VCU Libraries involvement was at this last stage—providing a stable, accessible digital platform for paper and audio files to house these important voices.

Making the project available in a searchable, digital format with streaming audio will expose these oral histories more broadly to researchers and residents alike at a time when interest in Historic Fulton is keen and the region is poised for renewal. The new Stone Brewing Company is locating to Fulton, heralding a potential rebirth of a forgotten community in coming years. “We expect this new collaborative collection to perform at the same high level as our other historic collections, to be used in courses and research at the university and in the community, and to receive thousands of touch points nationwide through its online visibility,” said Work.

“The Historic Fulton Oral History Project will be an invaluable research tool as students and scholars begin to examine what happened in Fulton during the 1970s,” said Meg Hughes, curator of archives for The Valentine. “Hearing firsthand accounts of living and working in this neighborhood brings Fulton to life.”

VCU Libraries has long fostered these sorts of partnerships in community and neighborhood documentation as part of our core values.

Said University Librarian John E. Ulmschneider: “VCU Libraries is proud to present and preserve this digital collection alongside its previous online efforts, such as Carver Community Oral Histories, Farmville Civil Rights Photographs, Voices of Freedom Oral Histories, and Jackson Ward Architectural History.” These collections are available online. http://dig.library.vcu.edu

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Image: Historic Fulton, Circa 1925, The Valentine

Emerging Leaders Program: Leadership education

Emerging Leaders Program

Leadership education is fast becoming an area of focus at VCU. Opportunities abound for those interested in leadership education. The newly established Emerging Leaders Program (ELP) is for students in the Honors College while the VCU Leaders Engaging in Advanced Discovery (LEAD) program places sophomores and higher-level students in a two-year immersive leadership curriculum in addition to their chosen field of study.

At the graduate level, the M.Ed. /M.B.A. Dual Degree Program in the Center for Sports Leadership includes curriculum that, while not specifically targeted on leadership education, delves into the subject matter of leadership research. One example is the course Organizational Leadership and Project Team Management (MGMT 541). Students engaged in research for this class would need access to leadership education resources. In addition, a leadership-focused Ph.D. program is in the approval process. This new program will provide mid-level executives with the knowledge and skills that will enable them to excel in the formulation and implementation of policy as leaders in public, private and non-profit sector organizations.

Along with these programs, VCU offers 15 new courses in leadership education. Seven are in undergraduate programs and eight are in the proposed doctoral progam.

To support this new emphasis on leadership education at VCU at all academic levels, VCU Libraries is now building a “Collection of Distinction for Leadership Education.” From Warren Bennis to Peter Senge, from Ronald Heifetz to Margaret Wheatley, the collection brims with works by leaders in the field.

“This collection will include the seminal literature of leadership education including journals, books and ebooks,” says Pattie Sobczak. As the Business and Public Affairs Collections Librarian, she is responsible for organizing the collection and making decisions and purchases. Since leadership crosses all disciplines, this collection will support leadership education at all levels of scholarship and across the spectrum of disciplines.

Have suggestions or questions for Dr. Sobczak as she works on the collection? Contact her at sobczak@vcu.edu or (804) 828-2729.

Image: VCU Honors College

Virtual Realities: Video game resources

Virtual Realities

More than 183 million people (57 percent of the population) in the United States play video games at least one hour daily. With so much time spent online, how can we separate virtual from real? What does scholarship about gaming reveal about the marketplace, leadership, teamwork and  entrepreneurship? Virtual worlds not only connected with reality but also inform and shape how we function daily. From earning mayoral status in Foursquare to discovering new football moves online, persistent virtual worlds influence our thoughts and behaviors in many ways.

According to researchers Jesse Schell and Jane McGonigal, young people will spend more than 10,000 hours online before they are 21. This equals the amount of time they are in class in grades five through 12. In addition, in their book “Got Game,” John Beck and Mitchell Wade argue that the brains of people who grow up playing games are wired differently from those not exposed to gaming from an early age.

“Gamification”–the use of game-like properties in non-game settings–engages people in activities that offer opportunities to earn and collect points and use those points for privileges. Examples are frequent-flier programs and retail store loyalty cards.  Also, the game “Re-Mission” was designed to attract teenagers with cancer who are now in remission. They play and earn points but the real outcome is to continually remind players about the importance of taking their medicine, even as they are feeling better. There are numerous other examples of gamification as ways to deliver information and influence behavior. Educators and employers have a unique opportunity to engage those who are comfortable in the digital space.

VCU’s Business and Collections Librarian Pattie Sobczak has expertise in gaming and virtual works as they connect to business and real world challenges. Available to consult with faculty who want to integrate gaming materials into curriculum, she writes and presents widely on the topic. Her doctoral dissertation in a program on human and organizational systems was on Ephemeral leadership in the workplace and in on-line gaming. Her doctoral dissertation in a program on human and organizational systems was on leadership in the workplace and in online gaming. See her presentation at a recent Digital Pragmata workshop.

Her recommendations for reading to inspire teaching and further research are:

The Gamification of Learning and Instruction: Game-based Methods and Strategies for Training and Education
http://search.library.vcu.edu/VCU:VCU_ALMA51454069210001101

The Gamification Revolution: How Leaders Leverage Game Mechanics to Crush the Competition
HF5414 .Z53 2013
http://search.library.vcu.edu/VCU:VCU_ALMA21434701690001101

The Gamification of Learning and Instruction Fieldbook: Ideas into Practice
http://search.library.vcu.edu/VCU:VCU_ALMA51448185070001101

Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World
GV1201.38 .M34 2011
http://search.library.vcu.edu/VCU:VCU_ALMA21380347320001101

Gamification in Education and Business
http://search.library.vcu.edu/VCU:VCU_ALMA51454554330001101

Creating E-Learning Games with Unity: Develop Your Own 3D E-Learning Game Using Gamification, Systems Design, and Gameplay
http://search.library.vcu.edu/VCU:TN_ebraryebr10854999

A Gamified Collaborative Course in Entrepreneurship: Focus on Objectives and Tools 
Computers in Human Behavior
http://search.library.vcu.edu/VCU:TN_sciversesciencedirect_elsevierS0747-5632(14)00700-6

Gamifying Learning Experiences: Practical Implications and Outcomes
Computers & Education
http://search.library.vcu.edu/VCU:TN_ericEJ1007852

Motivational Effects and Age Differences of Gamification in Product Advertising
The Journal of Consumer Marketing
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/JCM-04-2014-0945

Gamification, Social Networks and Sustainable Environments
International Journal of Interactive Multimedia and Artificial Intelligence
http://www.ijimai.org/journal/node/527

By Sue Robinson, director of communication and public relations. For more information about this resource or others

Image: Creative Commons

Flickr Commons: VCU digital special and archival collections

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VCU Libraries has been named as the 100th institution to take part in Flickr’s The Commons, an online project that seeks to share hidden treasures from the world’s public photography archives.

As part of The Commons, VCU Libraries’ digital special and archival image collections that have no known copyright restrictions will be discoverable through the photo-sharing website Flickr, as well as through search tools that pull public domain images without known copyright restrictions for us and reuse.
“It’s pretty significant,” said Lauren Work, digital collections librarian. “VCU Libraries will be joining an international group of institutions with the goal to increase public access to image collections that have no known copyright restrictions, which connects directly to our educational mission.”
Joining The Commons will greatly increase the discoverability and potential use of VCU Libraries’ image collections. It will also allow the public to share their knowledge of the images, potentially enriching the collections with comments and tags.
“Flickr has millions of registered users, and various search tools pull content from Flickr Commons,” Work said. “These factors greatly expand the potential for the use of our collections.”
VCU Libraries is starting out with these four collections to introduce itself to The Commons and to reflect  the diversity of its collections.
The initial collections will include:
 
·    Jackson Ward Historic District, a series of photographs documenting Richmond’s historic Jackson Ward neighborhood.

·    Rarely Seen Richmond, a collection of over 600 postcard images of Richmond, most dating from 1900 through 1930.

·    PS Magazine, the Preventive Maintenance Monthly, an Army publication on preventive maintenance that features the artwork of comics artist Will Eisner, who served as the magazine’s artistic director from its inception in 1951 through 1972.

·    Baist Atlas of Richmond, Va. (1889), a digitized version of “The Atlas of the City of Richmond” that was compiled and published in 1889 and serves as a valuable resource for researchers and others interested in Richmond’s urban archeology, architectural history and historic preservation.

·    The Newlyweds and Their Baby, which was the first American family newspaper strip. It was created in 1904 by George McManus and published in New York World, and centered around an elegant young couple and their baby Snookums.

Work said VCU Libraries intends to add other existing digital collections, as well as future collections that have no known copyright restrictions.

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Image: Joe’s Dope Sheet (Issue 052 1957 page024_page025), Flickr Commons

Creative Catalysts: VCU Arts Librarians

VCU Arts Librarians

Nell Chenault, Emily Davis Winthrop and Carla-Mae Crookendale can help you create, teach and find inspiration. Each of them brings a love and appreciation of the arts, related educational credentials and librarian savvy to their roles in VCU’s creative community.

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Nell Chenault, Film and Performing Arts Research Librarian

Schools and Departments Served: Cinema, Dance, Music, Photo/Film, Theatre, Art Foundation, MATX and Film Studies

Expertise/education

  • BA, English, University of Virginia
  • MLIS, Catholic University of America
  • Former Media Librarian and Head, Media and Reserves, VCU Libraries

Areas of interest

  • Intellectual property for media is always an interesting puzzle.
  • My interests are shifting toward intellectual rights in the global information commons. These rights issues impact us as both media and information producers and consumers.
  • Documentaries

What do you like most about what you do?

Media artist Nam June Paik described his work as “archeology of the present” with the goal of circulating ideas, digging them up from the ruin of the past to understand the present. He characterized his work as “priviledged.” I have experienced this through witnessing the works of the VCU community and sharing my knowledge and the VCU Libraries’ resources to help faculty and students reach their vision and come to new understanding.

What currently has your attention?

At home, I have been sorting and moving my large vinyl and CD collections, revisiting old favorites and playing overlooked recordings.

* * * * * 

Carla-Mae Crookendale, Visual Arts Research Librarian

Schools and Departments Served: Art Education, Art History, Communication Arts, Craft/Material Studies, Fashion Design, Graphic Design, Interior Design, Kinetic Imaging, Painting and Printmaking, Sculpture and Extended Media, Art Foundation, MATX

Expertise/education

  • BFA, Metals and Jewelry/Art History minor, Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)
  • MFA, Fashion, SCAD
  • MLIS, Valdosta State University
  • Costume shop manager and adjunct faculty, Theater Department, Belhaven College
  • Adjunct faculty, Metals and Jewelry Department, SCAD
  • Reference Librarian, SCAD

Areas of interest

  • Visual literacy, the ability to find, make and ethically use images and visual media.
  • User experience, helping library users have effective and enjoyable experiences in physical and virtual library spaces.
  • Design for good, how design can be used in innovative ways to make the world a better and more beautiful place.

What do you like most about what you do?
Working with creative people in a dynamic and diverse environment, constantly learning and being inspired.

What currently has your attention?
A terrific art, design and visual culture blog called Colossal http://www.thisiscolossal.com/. It’s a great way to discover new artists, and ranges from the quirky (Turn Boring Vegetables into Spaceships and Racecars with Le FabShop’s 3D-Printable ‘Open Toys’) to the whimsical (Artist JeeYoung Lee Converts Her Tiny Studio Into Absurdly Elaborate Non-Digital Dreamscapes) to the awe-inspiring (An Expansive Swirling Snow Drawing Atop a Frozen Lake by Sonja Hinrichsen).

* * * * * 

Emily Davis Winthrop, Arts Collection Librarian

Schools and Departments served: Collection development for the School of the Arts, with the exception of Music. Kevin Farley, PhD., Humanities Collections Librarian, handles collection development for Music.

Education and Expertise

  • BA, Art History, VCU
  • MA, Art History, VCU
  • PhD candidate, Art History (expected Spring 2015), VCU
  • Major field: 19th and early-20th century European art
  • Minor Field: Colonial Latin American art
  • Instructor, VCU Art History department and VCU Glasgow Artists and Writers Workshop

Areas of Interest

  • Epistemology. The core of being a bibliographer is to constantly examine the field of knowledge. What foundations and theoretical frameworks are necessary to make art, to understand art and to teach art?
  • Gender theory and theories of design. My own research focuses on issues of gender in art and theories of design and decorative arts circa 1900. My dissertation, “The Female Nude in Art Nouveau: Allegories of Modernity” looks at the ways in which the nude conveyed a message of modernism and how the form helped to destabilize the categories of fine and decorative art.

What do you like most about what you do? 

You become very myopic in graduate school, I enjoy the breadth and variety that comes with collection development.

What currently has your attention?
Formats. From electronic books and online catalogue raisonnés to 16mm and half-inch video reels, the arts have a variety of necessary formats all with their own issues.

Image: 

CRCnetBASE: Science, technology and medicine

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CRCnetBASE is a collection of more than 9,300 ebooks in more than 350 subject areas with a focus on science, technology and medicine. It has won awards for best reference, best platform and outstanding academic resource. It’s also accessible from any mobile device. The database also includes collections with specific focuses:

  • CHEMnetBASE includes chemical and chemical-related dictionaries like Handbook of Physics and Chemistry, Dictionary of Natural Products, Dictionary of Commonly Cited Compounds and many more. It has an interactive periodic table and quick search for chemical and physical properties of compounds.
  • FORENSICnetBASE offers ebooks on forensics, computer crime investigation, criminal justice, law enforcement, security management and more, with applications in both humanities and science fields.
  • ENVIROnetBASE contains interactive ebooks on environmental topics such as  environmental engineering, forestry, earth science, GIS and mapping, wildlife science, landscape ecology and more.
  • ENGnetBASE covers civil, electrical, industrial, mechanical and mining engineering, as well as more specific areas like networking communications, packaging and bio-processing.
  • MATERIALSnetBASE offers 50 handbooks and reference materials on topics like adhesives, ceramics and glass, fire science, surface engineering, metals and alloys and industrial textiles.

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Image: CHEMnetBASE

Art Browsery: VCU art book collection

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Look, learn and create: The Art Browsery, a dedicated book display on the fourth floor, James Branch Cabell Library, offers new, beautiful books that can inform your creativity.
“When you are caught up in the creative process of making art, sometimes you need to take a break and find added inspiration,” says Carla-Mae Crookendale, VCU Libraries’ visual arts librarian. She and arts collection librarian Emily Davis Winthrop identify titles that are right for The Browsery and showcase new titles there before moving them into the general collection, usually with the other oversized books on the fourth floor.
Browsery books are visually rich tomes on art, craft and design topics. They are marked with colorful bookstrap labels and they are available for checkout. There is a self-checkout station a few steps away from the display.

The Art Browsery will be refreshed as new titles arrive, so come by now and find some inspiring new materials, and come again to find more in the future.

Here is a brief list, compiled by Crookendale, of some of the new titles you’ll find in The Browsery.

Tiny Creatures: the world of microbes by Nicola Davies. Illustrated by Emily Sutton, 2014. A beautifully illustrated look at the world of the microscopic organisms, fusing art and learning for kids of all ages.

The Gay 90’s by Mark Ryden, 2013. Features the latest work by painter Mark Ryden who blends pop culture references with a painting style reminiscent of Jacques Louis David or Ingres. The results are whimsical, surreal – and just a bit twisted.
Tokyo Adorned by Thomas C. Card, 2014. Photographer Card captures the wildly over-the-top personalities and style of the kawaii Lolita street fashion subculture in Tokyo.
Dancescapes: a photographic journey by Shobha Deepak Singh, 2014. An exploration of the history of dance in modern India, this book features dreamlike vignettes of flowing bodies and costumes caught in dramatic motion.
Charles James: Beyond Fashion by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2014. A comprehensive overview of the work of Charles James, known as “America’s First Couturier.” Features photos of his intricately structured ball gowns as well as archival items about his design and production process.
Ai Weiwei: Evidence, edited by Gereon Sievernich, 2014. Illustrations and texts by and scholarly essays on the recent work of the acclaimed Chinese artist and activist featured in an exhibition at the Martin-Gropius-Baus museum in Berlin.
Landscape Installation Art, edited by Ifengspace, 2013. Photographs and analysis of immersive and interactive sculptural experiences created in range of media and settings.
Work of Art: Folk Artists in the 21st Century by Carmella Padilla and John Bigelow Taylor, 2013. A celebration of the richness and diversity of traditional art making all over the world, including painting, sculpture, decorative arts, clothing and jewelry.
Myths and Mysteries: Symbolism and Swiss Artists, edited by Valentina Anker & Pierre Rosenburg, 2013. Spirituality, psychology and the occult as expressed through the Symbolist movement in the arts of the 19th century.
Mariette Pathy Allen: TransCuba, by Mariela Castro, Allen Frame & Wendy Watriss, 2014. A photo-documentary exploration of the transgender community in Cuba, including interviews and analysis of its evolving role in Cuban culture.
Image: The Art Browsery, Fourth Floor, James Branch Cabell Library

ClinicalKey: Evidence-based practice information

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ClinicalKey now is your major source for evidence-based practice information on the go. The medical and surgical database from Elsevier is the new clinical reference resource replacing MDConsult.

It is available 24/7 from classrooms to clinics. An unlimited number of users can sign on simultaneously. Clinicians are the key users for this resource. But, because of its depth and vast offerings, ClinicalKey’s debut has implications for every program on the MCV Campus.

ClinicalKey includes many more high-quality books and journals, along with other content types, all searchable from a single interface.

Books: 1,100 medical and surgical reference books
Journals: 600 medical and surgical journals
Procedures Consult: procedural videos in various specialties
First Consult: more than 850 Point-of-Care clinical monographs
Drug Monographs: some  2,900 clinical pharmacology drug monographs from Gold Standard
Patient Education: 15,000 customizable patient education handouts
Clinical Trials:
all trials from the ClinicalTrials.gov database
Practice Guidelines:
4,500 practice guidelines
MEDLINE:
Fully indexed MEDLINE
Multimedia: 
17,000 medical and surgical videos and more than 2.2 million images

All content in ClinicalKey is updated daily. You create a personal ClinicalKey account to use special features such as the Presentation Maker or to save searches or to earn CME credit.

If you have questions or need assistance, contact Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences at (804) 828-0636 or by email at library@vcu.edu.

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