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After National Guideline Clearinghouse shutdown: Find guidelines in these library resources

Due to a loss in federal funding, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s National Guideline Clearinghouse was shut down on July 16, 2018. To continue accessing current, evidence-based clinical guidelines, VCU Libraries’ users can tap the following resources.

  • PubMed
    • Conduct a search for a condition (e.g. diabetes).
    • To the left of your search results, click on Customize under the Article Types section.
    • Select Practice Guideline and click on Show.
    • Click on the Practice Guideline option that is now displaying under Article Types.
  • CINAHL
    • Enter your search terms for a condition (e.g. diabetes).
    • Before conducting your search, scroll down and select Practice Guidelines under Publication Type.
    • Click Search.
  • ClinicalKey
    • To the left of the search bar, change All Types to Guidelines.
    • Enter your search terms for a condition (e.g. diabetes).
    • Click on the orange Search icon (magnifying glass) or hit the Return/Enter key on your keyboard.
  • Trip Medical Database
    • Conduct a search for a condition (e.g. diabetes).
    • Select the Guidelines filter to the right of your search results.
  • UpToDate
    • Conduct a search for a condition (e.g. diabetes).
    • Select a monograph to view (e.g. Overview of medical care in adults with diabetes mellitus).
    • Scroll down the Topic Outline on the left-hand side and select Society Guideline Links.

If you have any additional questions about accessing guidelines, please contact your liaison librarian.

This content is based on Brandi Tuttle’s post at Duke University’s Medical Center Library & Archives and used with permission. 

Merck Index Online: for research and everyday

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Merck Index Online is an authoritative source of information on chemicals, drugs and biologicals. You an search or browse its more than 11,000 monographs (chemical compounds) that can be explored for research and everyday practical purposes. Ideal for quick searches to reveal the properties of compounds and biologicals, Merck Index Online provides identifiers such as CAS Registry Number and structure. It also gives the molecular formula, molecular weight and melting point as well as Trademark names.

Structure search is simplified by the ‘convert’ feature, which allows for inserting a compound name and then converting it to a structure to enable a substructure or exact structure search. It has more than 500 organic named reactions (ONR) which have been recognized and referred to by name within the chemistry community, for example, the Ehrlich-Sachs Reaction (1899). Attached to each ONR are relevant references including that of the original description. All references are from scholarly journals, encyclopedias and handbooks. Apart from properties, all records have appropriate sections that describe them, depending on the type of compound. One example is the “Therapeutic Category” under Classifications, which is useful for identifying uses of compounds and their derivatives in healing, re: Glybuzole – Trademark name – Gludiase as an antidiabetic. The database is further enhanced by its 28 reference tables.

Merck Index Online is valuable to researchers, faculty and students in basic science, chemistry, pharmacy, chemical and life science engineering, biomedical sciences, dentistry, allied health, and medicine. It is also useful for everyday practical purposes such as information on additives or components, nutrients, minerals, and proteins. For example, get all the information for the cooking spice, nutmeg, its uses in flavoring food and beverages, nutmeg oil as a fragrance in soaps, detergents, creams, lotions, perfumes, and candles.

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By Ibironke Lawal, engineering and science collections librarian

Image: First issue, titled Merck’s Index

Anatomy.TV: Explore the human body in 3D

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VCU now offers unlimited access to Anatomy.TV, which features comprehensive and interactive 3D models of the human body.

This digital medical resource provides more than 6,500 anatomical structures, clinical slides, dissections, illustrations and animations that span every region of the body. The models are developed using real scan data providing medically accurate representations. The interactive human body is separated into nine regions that are fully explorable from simple structures in the head and neck area to the complexity of gross motor functions.

VCU’s Anatomy.TV subscription gives users access to three interactive modules: 3D Atlas, 3D Real-time and Functional Anatomy.

  • 3D Atlas presents a foundational learning experience, allowing users to select specific structures or systems. It provides interactive 3D views that can be layered, MRI scans, anatomical illustrations and movies. 3D Atlas operates like an interactive textbook, providing a guided look at the human anatomy.
  • 3D Real-time provides the same content as 3D Atlas, but offers a greater customizable and interactive experience. Users can fully explore 3D anatomical structures with an enhanced ability to rotate, zoom and layer. Structures can be made opaque or translucent and may be viewed in isolation or within its greater system. 3D Real-time also supports annotation and pin creation, audio pronunciations, drawing and labeling, and a stereoscopic 3D effect for viewing with 3D glasses.
  • Functional Anatomy includes a 3D anatomy atlas of over 290 interactive views, more than 75 muscle function animations and over 80 surface anatomy movies for real-life context. This module focuses on the musculoskeletal systems and their movements.

Anatomy.TV is indexed and exportable allowing for integration into presentations, slides and other study materials. Interactive quizzes and tutorial videos are also available to users.

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By K.J. Ricasata, Tompkins-McCaw Library Stacks Supervisor and Public Relations intern

For more information about this or any library resource

Image: Anatomy.TV

Rehabilitation Reference Center

RRCFind it

Rehabilitation Reference Center (RRC) is an evidence-based tool for practitioners needing point-of-care information on conditions, treatments, and patient education materials. Through a basic search, rehabilitation specialists can access articles on their topic of interest, as well as other information related to that topic, such as exercise images for patient follow-up, guidelines, excerpts from journals and books, and drug information. Specialists can even create folders to save and share materials from their search. For an in-depth look at RRC, be sure to watch the video tour (Adobe Flash must be installed to play the video).

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By Talicia Tarver, research and education librarian

Image: Rehabilitation Reference Center, Chest – 4 Door Frame Stretch (Static)

Gene: Known and predicted gene information

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Gene provides users with comprehensive information on known and predicted genes.

There is gene-specific information on species ranging from bees to orangutans. Within the results for a particular gene, users are given information on everything such as the lineage, gene type and scientific name of the organism. There are more than 14 million entries based on major taxonomic groups.

Use the search bar to browse by free text, chromosomes and symbols and much more. Within gene results, users are given the gene’s gene type, organism and brief summary of what it is and it’s affect on the species. Use Gene to find out how muscular dystrophy affects the human body of learn the official full name for breast cancer metastasis.

The database allows users to acquire more information from different databases such as PubMed and Map Viewer.

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By Katlyn Pierre, public relations intern. For more information about this resource or others

Image: Creative Commons

Psychotherapy.net: Trial of streaming videos

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VCU Libraries offers a trial of streaming videos from Psychotherapy.net. Faculty are invited to access this item from the Trials web page.  Test this from home or remote locations to see how the streaming holds up. Feedback will be important to making a purchasing decision. The trial goes through Oct. 10.

Psychotherapy.net includes interviews, lectures and therapy sessions conducted by leading psychotherapists and counselors. VCU Libraries already holds many Psychotherapy.net titles on DVD and online via Counseling and Therapy in Video. The collection in preview now includes newer titles but there is some overlap with existing products.

Features include the ability to search the collection by keyword or browse by client population, therapist, therapeutic genre or specific issue. There is also an easy way to create clips for classroom use or research by highlighting text in the transcript. Plus, users can further refine their search by looking for keywords in the transcript when they are viewing a particular video.

By Lynne Turman, collections librarian, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences

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Image: Creative Commons

Anatomy.TV: Structures of the human body

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Anatomy.TV provides users with quality, in-depth information on the entire composition of the human body.

The database divides the body into nine sections for users to search through, including the head and neck, the foot and ankle and the thorax and abdomen. Along with the general structure, users are given the MRI, slides and movies on a particular section of the body.

To help users better understand the general workings of the body, Anatomy.TV offers interactive quizzes, 3D atlases and activities. The 3D atlas allows users to click on various arteries, bones and organs to more closely inspect their locations and functions. Users can access the interactive quizzes to test their knowledge on particular parts of the human body and to get an in-depth review of the body parts and their functions through a “review” button that links to that body part.

A catalog of videos is also available to help users comprehend what body parts allow humans to do certain movements. The VCU Libraries’ subscription to AnatomyTV now includes the Real Time feature. Real Time allows users to view three-dimensional images of human anatomy and capture images of selected views to later insert into emails and presentations. Real Time works best through Internet Explorer.

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By Katlyn Pierre, public relations intern. For more information about this resource or others

Updated by Talicia TarverResearch and Education Librarian, Tompkins-McCaw Library

Image: Anatomy.TV

New Web of Science Databases: Expanded resources

VCU Libraries in 2015 expanded its access to Web of Science (WOS) databases with the addition of new titles and backfile coverage for existing titles.

Compiled by Lynne Turman, head of collections, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences and Ibironke Lawal, engineering and special collections librarian

Image: Creative Commons

CRCnetBASE: Science, technology and medicine

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CRCnetBASE is a collection of more than 9,300 ebooks in more than 350 subject areas with a focus on science, technology and medicine. It has won awards for best reference, best platform and outstanding academic resource. It’s also accessible from any mobile device. The database also includes collections with specific focuses:

  • CHEMnetBASE includes chemical and chemical-related dictionaries like Handbook of Physics and Chemistry, Dictionary of Natural Products, Dictionary of Commonly Cited Compounds and many more. It has an interactive periodic table and quick search for chemical and physical properties of compounds.
  • FORENSICnetBASE offers ebooks on forensics, computer crime investigation, criminal justice, law enforcement, security management and more, with applications in both humanities and science fields.
  • ENVIROnetBASE contains interactive ebooks on environmental topics such as  environmental engineering, forestry, earth science, GIS and mapping, wildlife science, landscape ecology and more.
  • ENGnetBASE covers civil, electrical, industrial, mechanical and mining engineering, as well as more specific areas like networking communications, packaging and bio-processing.
  • MATERIALSnetBASE offers 50 handbooks and reference materials on topics like adhesives, ceramics and glass, fire science, surface engineering, metals and alloys and industrial textiles.

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Image: CHEMnetBASE

Art Browsery: VCU art book collection

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Look, learn and create: The Art Browsery, a dedicated book display on the fourth floor, James Branch Cabell Library, offers new, beautiful books that can inform your creativity.
“When you are caught up in the creative process of making art, sometimes you need to take a break and find added inspiration,” says Carla-Mae Crookendale, VCU Libraries’ visual arts librarian. She and arts collection librarian Emily Davis Winthrop identify titles that are right for The Browsery and showcase new titles there before moving them into the general collection, usually with the other oversized books on the fourth floor.
Browsery books are visually rich tomes on art, craft and design topics. They are marked with colorful bookstrap labels and they are available for checkout. There is a self-checkout station a few steps away from the display.

The Art Browsery will be refreshed as new titles arrive, so come by now and find some inspiring new materials, and come again to find more in the future.

Here is a brief list, compiled by Crookendale, of some of the new titles you’ll find in The Browsery.

Tiny Creatures: the world of microbes by Nicola Davies. Illustrated by Emily Sutton, 2014. A beautifully illustrated look at the world of the microscopic organisms, fusing art and learning for kids of all ages.

The Gay 90’s by Mark Ryden, 2013. Features the latest work by painter Mark Ryden who blends pop culture references with a painting style reminiscent of Jacques Louis David or Ingres. The results are whimsical, surreal – and just a bit twisted.
Tokyo Adorned by Thomas C. Card, 2014. Photographer Card captures the wildly over-the-top personalities and style of the kawaii Lolita street fashion subculture in Tokyo.
Dancescapes: a photographic journey by Shobha Deepak Singh, 2014. An exploration of the history of dance in modern India, this book features dreamlike vignettes of flowing bodies and costumes caught in dramatic motion.
Charles James: Beyond Fashion by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2014. A comprehensive overview of the work of Charles James, known as “America’s First Couturier.” Features photos of his intricately structured ball gowns as well as archival items about his design and production process.
Ai Weiwei: Evidence, edited by Gereon Sievernich, 2014. Illustrations and texts by and scholarly essays on the recent work of the acclaimed Chinese artist and activist featured in an exhibition at the Martin-Gropius-Baus museum in Berlin.
Landscape Installation Art, edited by Ifengspace, 2013. Photographs and analysis of immersive and interactive sculptural experiences created in range of media and settings.
Work of Art: Folk Artists in the 21st Century by Carmella Padilla and John Bigelow Taylor, 2013. A celebration of the richness and diversity of traditional art making all over the world, including painting, sculpture, decorative arts, clothing and jewelry.
Myths and Mysteries: Symbolism and Swiss Artists, edited by Valentina Anker & Pierre Rosenburg, 2013. Spirituality, psychology and the occult as expressed through the Symbolist movement in the arts of the 19th century.
Mariette Pathy Allen: TransCuba, by Mariela Castro, Allen Frame & Wendy Watriss, 2014. A photo-documentary exploration of the transgender community in Cuba, including interviews and analysis of its evolving role in Cuban culture.
Image: The Art Browsery, Fourth Floor, James Branch Cabell Library

ClinicalKey: Evidence-based practice information

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ClinicalKey now is your major source for evidence-based practice information on the go. The medical and surgical database from Elsevier is the new clinical reference resource replacing MDConsult.

It is available 24/7 from classrooms to clinics. An unlimited number of users can sign on simultaneously. Clinicians are the key users for this resource. But, because of its depth and vast offerings, ClinicalKey’s debut has implications for every program on the MCV Campus.

ClinicalKey includes many more high-quality books and journals, along with other content types, all searchable from a single interface.

Books: 1,100 medical and surgical reference books
Journals: 600 medical and surgical journals
Procedures Consult: procedural videos in various specialties
First Consult: more than 850 Point-of-Care clinical monographs
Drug Monographs: some  2,900 clinical pharmacology drug monographs from Gold Standard
Patient Education: 15,000 customizable patient education handouts
Clinical Trials:
all trials from the ClinicalTrials.gov database
Practice Guidelines:
4,500 practice guidelines
MEDLINE:
Fully indexed MEDLINE
Multimedia: 
17,000 medical and surgical videos and more than 2.2 million images

All content in ClinicalKey is updated daily. You create a personal ClinicalKey account to use special features such as the Presentation Maker or to save searches or to earn CME credit.

If you have questions or need assistance, contact Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences at (804) 828-0636 or by email at library@vcu.edu.

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Oral Pathology Review Images: Oral abnormalities compilation

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Oral Pathology Review Images gives dentistry students a new and improved way to study oral abnormalities.

Dr. Dennis Page of the Department of Oral Pathology at the VCU School of Dentistry developed this collection to help students learn about the most common abnormalities of the oral cavity. The collection includes images of soft tissue abnormalities and radiographic abnormalities of the oral cavity. The images may be searched by type of abnormality, description or Medical Subject Heading (MeSH).

These images were previously on a website, but have been upgraded to a content management system that is especially designed to handle archives and special collections. The images are clearer and brighter and can be resized. The original slides are still held at Tompkins-McCaw Library Special Collections and Archives.

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To view the images in person, visit Special Collections and Archives at Tompkins-McCaw Library.

Image: Oral Pathology Review Images, VCU Libraries

Digital-Tutors: Online training library

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Digital-Tutors, a vast online video training library, presents professional instruction that is accessible and comprehensive. Designed by industry professionals, video tutorials assist artists and designers in developing skills and learning the latest techniques for two-dimensional and three-dimensional digital art, game development, video and video effects.

With more than 24,000 videos and constantly growing, Digital-Tutors is the largest resource of its kind with training that ranges from learning basics of a program such as Photoshop to advanced instruction for scripting in Nuke. Tutorials cover major design software as well as smaller, more specific programs. These include: Adobe design and photography software, Maya, Zbrush, Cinema 4D and many more.

Members of the VCU community first must create a member account and log in to our group.

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Image: Digital-Tutors website

New England Journal of Medicine: Medical reporting history

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The New England Journal of Medicine has a history of groundbreaking medical reporting, including its coverage of the first demonstration of ether anesthesia, the first successful treatments of childhood leukemia and the role of aspirin in heart health.

Its archives, available through VCU Libraries, include more than 150,000 articles and 85,000 images from 1812 to 1989. The current subscription covers 1990 to present. The full-text of every issue can be searched, browsed and downloaded.

The New England Journal of Medicine has been in publication for two centuries and reaches 177 countries. According to its website, it is the most-cited medical journal in the world and the only one to win an award for journalistic writing.

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By Caitlin Puffenberger, communications intern 

Image: New England Journal of Medicine