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Access World News: New and current media

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Access World News contains materials from 9,688 sources spanning 160 countries, 1978 to the present. Content includes newspapers, newswires, journals, broadcast transcripts and videos. Searching can be limited to:

  • Country, state and territory, region, province or city
  • Decade, year, month, day, era or presidential era
  • Language

In addition to searching, users can use the Find a Topic feature to browse by topic. Twelve broad subject areas are broken down into lists of popular and current interest topics. Clicking a topic acts as a user-friendly starting point for related search terms.

Access World News also provides a “quick access” style list of special reports and hot topics. These items gather news reports of breaking events and popular social and cultural topics for ease of access. Users can find these lists under “Other Products” in the upper left corner of the search screen.

Coverage of the Richmond Times-Dispatch may be of particular interest to local scholars. The Richmond Times-Dispatch is covered from 1985–present. Additionally, Richmond Times-Dispatch blogs are covered from 2006–present. The Collegian from the University of Richmond (2007–current) and the Commonwealth Times from VCU (2003–current) are also indexed.

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By Stephani Rodgers, liaison to Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness

Image: Access World News

Times Digital Archive: Every page & article since 1785

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VCU Libraries provides access to a vast resource of historical and contemporary information via the Times Digital Archive.  Recording centuries of British and world history, culture, politics and business, The Times (London) was established in 1785, and is the oldest daily newspaper in continuous publication. The Times Digital Archive is an online, full-text facsimile of more than 200 years of The Times, providing searchable access to every page of every issue from 1785. This access represents 1.4 million pages, nearly 70,000 issues and more than 11 million individual articles.

From this wealth of information, researchers have an unparalleled opportunity to search and view historical and contemporary journalism and images of human events. Read by both world leaders and the general public, The Times has offered readers in-depth, award-winning and objective coverage of world events since its creation. The user interface facilitates quick searches as well as detailed research, browsing for discovery and download options.

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By Kevin Farley, humanities collections librarian

Image: Waymarking.com

Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century

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VCU Libraries offers The Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century, a landmark digital collection for African-American studies. With this resource, researchers have access to historical analysis and context, original newspaper accounts and crucial first-person records of the experiences of those seeking greater political and cultural freedom in the turbulent 20th century.

Records reveal not only the efforts of those in power to oppose the civil rights movement, but the organizational efforts and everyday protests of individuals and groups united to end widespread restrictions to freedom for blacks in the United States.

The wealth of sources includes government records from the FDR, Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan and H. W. Bush presidencies, as well as the activities of the FBI on civil rights leaders and participants. The records of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACWC), Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) are available.

From the founding of the NACWC in the last decade of the 19th century to the riots that followed the verdict in the Rodney King trial in the 1990s, researchers will discover how these momentous events were experienced by those who lived them, and continue to influence American life, culture and politics today.

Of particular importance is the inclusion of vast records that describe events that may be less known now, but were crucial milestones in the struggles against oppression and toward equality. These include: the fight against forced labor in the first half of the 20th century (documented in the Peonage Files of the U.S. Department of Justice, 1901-1945); the migration of African-Americans to urban areas in search of work and equality; the East St. Louis Riot of 1917; the Scottsboro case and the passage of the anti-lynching laws; the heroism of the Tuskegee Airmen during World War II; the FBI actions against the Black Panther Party, and the passage of the Civil Rights Act. These detailed and multi-layered perspectives on history await discovery in The Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century and will create innovative teaching and research for VCU.

Additional online scholarship available through VCU Libraries includes Black Historical Newspapers, Black Studies Center, Black Studies in Video, and Slavery and Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive.

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By Kevin Farley, humanities collections librarian

Image:  Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Photographs and Prints Division, The New York Public Library. “William L. Patterson, executive director of the Civil Rights Congress, addressing the Bill of Rights Conference, circa 1940s.” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1940 – 1949. 

Governmentattic.org: FOIA requested docs posted online

 

FOIA

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Governmentattic.org is a non-commercial website that provides electronic copies of Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) inquiries. The documents on the website were obtained legally, following the FOIA rules. Each document has an identified source. The site is funded by the site owners, and receives no outside funding. Governmentattic.org is organized into 11 categories, including Department of Justice documents, FBI documents, Legislative Agencies, Government Corporations and State Records. From the FBI records regarding Ike Turner and alleged check passing to files regarding electronic surveillance at the Department of Justice, there is something to interest everyone.

If you are curious about how many requests are fulfilled and denied, you might be interested in the data from foia.gov.  This site also explains the process for filing a FOIA request.

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By Stephani Rodgers, Liaison for Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness

HeinOnline: Legal materials from the colonies forward

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VCU Libraries subscribes to HeinOnline, a searchable image-based database of legal research materials. What makes acquisition of this database exciting is its depth and its application to so many different disciplines and areas of study. While HeinOnline is an excellent resource for researchers looking for articles on legal issues of any kind, the collections have applicability to anyone studying history, political science, public policy and administration, homeland security, criminal justice, international relations, or any topic which involves those subjects.

At the heart of the database is the law journal collection which includes more than 2,000 publications, each provided from its first issue to the latest, subject to moving-wall restrictions. The historical collection of state statutes provides superseded statutes for all 50 states, some dating as far back as 1717.

The same “from inception” coverage, with various cut-off dates, applies to the Federal Register, Code of Federal Regulations, U.S. Statutes at Large, U.S. Reports, and many other collections. Having older versions of laws and regulations is of great benefit for those researching the evolution of statutory and regulatory coverage of certain topics.

A few examples will provide an indication of how deep the collections are. The U.S. Treaties and Agreements Library contains not only all U.S. treaties, but also books and other texts such as Great European Treaties of the Nineteenth Century (1918), History of the Five Indian Nations of Canada (1755), and treaty guides and indexes such as Hertslet’s Commercial Treaties: A Complete Collection (Vols. 1-31). Foreign Relations of the United States covers every administration from Lincoln through Carter and also includes historical texts such as Trescot’s Diplomatic History of the Administration of Washington and Adams (1857) among many others. The U.S. Congressional Documents collection includes the Congressional Record (and its predecessors) from the 1st Congress to current, as well as Congressional Budget Office documents from 1976 to present, and what appears to be all of the unclassified Congressional Research Service (CRS) Reports. Finally,the Session Laws collection for Virginia covers 1661-2013, thus extending our access significantly backward from December, 1861, the date of the first print volume in our collection.

Each page of every document has a permanent link. Click on the link icon to display the permanent link that can then be placed anywhere.

Citations for journal articles only may be exported to RefWorks; instructions are linked from the RefWorks guide. The combination of WestlawNext and HeinOnline provides access to legal, regulatory, and Congressional information from colonial times to the present day.

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By Marilyn Scott, education research librarian

Image: Creative Commons

iPOLL: Comprehensive U.S. data from 1935 to today

iPoll (2)

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Drawn from every major polling organization in the United States, iPOLL offers comprehensive and up-to-date national and some international public opinion poll data. With more than 650,000 questions and answers dating to 1935, users can find public opinions on a variety of topics.

The database offers useful search features, including keyword, topic, organization and dates and also searching within a set of question results. iPOLL contains polling data on public policy issues ranging from elections to social security to religious status.

Special note may be made of the Topics at a Glance feature. Users may choose from a variety of topics found in the headlines, utilizing the pre-populated datasets, charts and issue briefs to get a quick overview of public opinion.

iPool is managed by The Roper Center for Public Opinion Research, currently located at the University of Connecticut. According to its website: “It is one of the world’s leading archives of social science data, specializing in data from public opinion surveys. The Center’s mission is to collect, preserve, and disseminate public opinion data; to serve as a resource to help improve the practice of survey research; and to broaden the understanding of public opinion through the use of survey data in the United States and abroad. Founded in 1947, the Roper Center holds data ranging from the 1930s, when survey research was in its infancy, to the present. Its collection now includes over 22,000 datasets and adds hundreds more each year. In total, the archive contains responses from millions of individuals on a vast range of topics. …  The Roper Center has a strong presence in the public opinion community and maintains cooperative relationships with other archives around the world. Its Board of Directors contains representatives from both academic and commercial public opinion research.”

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Image: Creative Commons

by Nia Rodgers

Medicovan: VCU new publications

Medicovan
Medicovan, the monthly newsletter for the MCV Campus from 1948-73 has now been added to the digital collection VCU News Publications. This collection also includes VCU Today, VCU Voice, VCU News, and UniverCity News–all of which were official university news sources.

According to the Digital Collection’s website, in the years following World War II, the administration of the Medical College of Virginia (MCV) sought to enhance communication among its growing faculty and staff through the publication of a monthly newsletter. The publication first appeared in February of 1948 under the masthead “Name Me, Please!” Ann Blanton, secretary in the St. Philip Hospital administrator’s office, won the naming contest with her suggestion of The Medicovan. For the next 25 years. Medicovan carried announcements, administrative messages, personnel updates, and news from the hospitals, departments, schools and other units at MCV. Following the creation of Virginia Commonwealth University in 1968, the Medicovan broadened its scope to include news of people and events on the Academic Campus of VCU. With the appearance of the new University newsletter, VCU Today, in May of 1972, the Medicovan was phased out.
The VCU News Publications collection contains a wealth of information on the University’s past. In addition to news stories, feature articles and event calendars, there are hundreds of images of campus life and of former students, staff, faculty and administrators. What might be most significant is the wide range of University reports that were published. Departments and schools also submitted articles and other news items of interest to the University community. Letters to the editor, editorials, and formal messages from deans and presidents are examples of some of the content found in this digitized collection.

The print issues of The Medicovan are housed in Special Collections and Archives at the Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences on the MCV campus. VCU Today, VCU Voice, UniverCity New and VCU News are available in Special Collections and Archives departments on both campuses.

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19th Century Prints: Richmond historical print collection

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As the capital of the Confederacy, national and international attention were focused on Richmond, Va., throughout the mid-19th century. In a period when photography was still a new medium, news magazines relied on drawings and paintings for visual coverage of these scenes and events. The Richmond Nineteenth-Century Print Collection includes more than 140 such depictions dating from 1853 to 1901.

The images are created by both local and foreign artists, and were published in periodicals such as Harper’s Weekly, American Architect and Building News and Illustrated London News. The content of the images varies, providing a wealth of research opportunities, according to Archives Coordinator Ray Bonis: “The collection has dozens of applications for research — from how African-Americans were depicted in images, sometimes in grotesque stereotypes, to rare views that architectural historians might want of Richmond streetscapes or buildings now lost.”

You can view the prints online through VCU Libraries Digital Collections or see hard copies of these prints and others at Special Collections and Archives, James Branch Cabell Library.

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Image: Alabama regiment marching through Capitol Square, Harper’s Weekly, 1861, Richmond 19th Century Print Collection

Digital-Tutors: Online training library

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Digital-Tutors, a vast online video training library, presents professional instruction that is accessible and comprehensive. Designed by industry professionals, video tutorials assist artists and designers in developing skills and learning the latest techniques for two-dimensional and three-dimensional digital art, game development, video and video effects.

With more than 24,000 videos and constantly growing, Digital-Tutors is the largest resource of its kind with training that ranges from learning basics of a program such as Photoshop to advanced instruction for scripting in Nuke. Tutorials cover major design software as well as smaller, more specific programs. These include: Adobe design and photography software, Maya, Zbrush, Cinema 4D and many more.

Members of the VCU community first must create a member account and log in to our group.

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Image: Digital-Tutors website

British Periodicals: Coverage of publications from 1680 to 1930s

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British Periodicals Collection II contains comprehensive full-run coverage of popular and scholarly publications from the 1680s to the 1930s. This collection focuses on the culture and creative industries of Britain and consists of more than 300 journals. Coverage includes publications from the microfilm collections English Periodicals and British Periodicals in the Creative Arts as well as additional selected titles. Journals were chosen based on importance within the field of British studies and availability in American libraries.

Access to full-text primary source materials in indexed digital formats, such as British Periodicals, is changing the nature of teaching and research in the arts and humanities. Researchers can work directly with primary sources for assignments rather than solely relying on interpretive texts.

Multidisciplinary in its scope, Collection II brings the vital British art press directly to researchers. Subjects covered in this collection include literature, music, art, drama, archeology and architecture in Britain and beyond.

Researchers can search the full-text of each page of these publications previously unavailable online. Some 3 million pages are available in high-resolution facsimile images. Page images are available in both bitonal versions, for ease of reading on a screen, and grayscale versions, to provide a more authentic and detailed record.

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By Emily Davis, arts collections librarian

Image: Play Pictorial: Babes in the Woods, British Periodicals

VCU News Publications: 30 years of VCU history

VCU News

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Nearly 30 years of VCU history are represented in VCU Libraries newest digital collection, “VCU News Publications.”  The Office of University Relations produced these publications, which carried different titles over the years.

These periodicals tell VCU’s official story in news articles, features, calendars and images of students, staff, faculty and leaders. Departments and schools submitted articles and news items. Letters to the editor, editorials and formal messages from deans and the president are also found in the 542 issues in this online collection.

The first of these official news organs was published in May of 1972 as the weekly VCU Today. (It was preceded on the MCV campus by the Medicovan, published from 1948 until 1973.) VCU Today was published on an irregular basis, often monthly, until the 1980s when it became a bi-weekly.

The staff included professional writers, photographers and editors, who represented the views of the university administration and highlighted news that the school wanted publicized. By the 1980s, the newspaper was circulated to full-time staff on both campuses and was also made available in a number of VCU buildings. It was probably the institution’s best vehicle for communicating to the large university community.

In 1988, the newspaper became the VCU Voice. In 1998, it became the UniverCity News. In 2001, it became  VCU News. It was published online in 2002 and is today’s News Center.

The print issues are housed in the Special Collections and Archives departments in the Tompkins-McCaw Library on the MCV campus and in the James Branch Cabell Library on the Monroe Park Campus.

Dates for the publications:

  • VCU Today: 1972-1988
  • VCU Voice: 1988-1998
  • UniverCity News: 1998-2001 
  • VCU News: 2001-2002

Copyright for the materials in this collection is managed by the VCU Libraries. The use of these materials is subject to the stipulations specified in the VCU Libraries copyright page.

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