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Embase: Broaden your biomedical and pharmacological research

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Embase is now available at VCU. VCU Libraries recommends users turn to this vast biomedical and pharmacological research database as a companion to PubMed/MEDLINE because of its broad international research scope.

This deep resource draws on publications from more than 90 countries. Embase provides access to 30 million abstracts and citations from more than 8,500 peer-reviewed journals (1974 forward) and nearly 2 million conference abstracts (2009 forward). Additionally, this database offers in excess of 6 million records and 2,900 journals not included in MEDLINE. It includes full-text indexing of drug, disease and medical device data as well.

Embase also features Emtree, a taxonomy designed for complete and precise information retrieval. More than twice as large as the MEDLINE MeSH thesaurus, Emtree includes thousands of terms for medical devices and general medical procedures. All MeSH terms are linked to Emtree terms, allowing for consistent searching of the Embase biomedical database.

This resource is recommended for use in systematic reviews as well as pharmacovigilance/drug therapy and medical device information.

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By: K.J. Ricasata, TML Stacks Supervisor, and Brandon Burneson, Research and Education Assistant

Image: Embase on Ovid

Anatomy.TV: Explore the human body in 3D

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VCU now offers unlimited access to Anatomy.TV, which features comprehensive and interactive 3D models of the human body.

This digital medical resource provides more than 6,500 anatomical structures, clinical slides, dissections, illustrations and animations that span every region of the body. The models are developed using real scan data providing medically accurate representations. The interactive human body is separated into nine regions that are fully explorable from simple structures in the head and neck area to the complexity of gross motor functions.

VCU’s Anatomy.TV subscription gives users access to three interactive modules: 3D Atlas, 3D Real-time and Functional Anatomy.

  • 3D Atlas presents a foundational learning experience, allowing users to select specific structures or systems. It provides interactive 3D views that can be layered, MRI scans, anatomical illustrations and movies. 3D Atlas operates like an interactive textbook, providing a guided look at the human anatomy.
  • 3D Real-time provides the same content as 3D Atlas, but offers a greater customizable and interactive experience. Users can fully explore 3D anatomical structures with an enhanced ability to rotate, zoom and layer. Structures can be made opaque or translucent and may be viewed in isolation or within its greater system. 3D Real-time also supports annotation and pin creation, audio pronunciations, drawing and labeling, and a stereoscopic 3D effect for viewing with 3D glasses.
  • Functional Anatomy includes a 3D anatomy atlas of over 290 interactive views, more than 75 muscle function animations and over 80 surface anatomy movies for real-life context. This module focuses on the musculoskeletal systems and their movements.

Anatomy.TV is indexed and exportable allowing for integration into presentations, slides and other study materials. Interactive quizzes and tutorial videos are also available to users.

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By K.J. Ricasata, Tompkins-McCaw Library Stacks Supervisor and Public Relations intern

For more information about this or any library resource

Image: Anatomy.TV

Communal effort creates access to rare ms.

On Friday afternoon, April 7, Transcribathoners gathered in the lecture hall of Cabell Library. A Transcriba-what? 

Transcribathons are organized by the Folger Shakespeare Library: Think of it as crowd-sourcing to decipher the handwriting of early modern manuscripts. Co-sponsored with the Folger Shakespeare Library, the VCU Department of English, the VCU Humanities Research Center and VCU Libraries, the Transcribathon provided hands-on digital humanities work—moving forward the Folger project to provide readable transcriptions of rare manuscripts in their collections via an open-access database for global access by researchers and students of this pivotal era in history (http://emmo.folger.edu/).

Handwriting from this period followed a variety of forms, including the prominent “Secretary’s Hand,” which may seem to our eyes ornate and often somewhat unreadable. And yet this kind of detective work is extremely popular—especially at VCU, which has the honor of being the only university to host a Transcribathon twice!

her photos are available on the library Flickr site.