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Tag Archives: Business

Passport GMID: Global market information database

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Research global markets with Passport GMID.  From Euromonitor, a business intelligence company with more than 40 years of experience analyzing developed and emerging markets, Passport GMID provides in-depth analysis, statistics, surveys, and news for industries, consumer markets, and business environments all over the world. Find company and brand shares of leading companies; use dashboards and data to identify potential markets; and read full text market research reports for over 20 consumer product and services categories.

Passport Industrial research examines the industrial makeup of the 68 largest economies in the world. Each economy is broken down into 177 industries, providing cross country comparable data and analysis. Passport Industrial is our first major research effort of B2B markets. Data points include production, profitability, imports, exports, buyers, suppliers, etc. Reports are modeled after Porter’s Five Forces. In the near future, Euromonitor will be expanding its Industrial research to 20 additional countries. The added coverage will be a deeper extension of the current and well-received  Markets of the Future (MOTF) reports. The addition of these countries will bring Euromonitor’s premier research coverage to 98% of Global GDP and 91% of Global Population.

Passport Cities provides fully comparable data and in-depth analysis on 1,150 of the world’s largest cities. There are detailed reviews of 120 of the world’s major metropolitan areas. Datagraphics, opinion 1 pieces, and dashboards are also prominently featured.

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By Patricia Sobczak, business and public affairs collections librarian

Image: Creative Commons

Mergent Archives: Historical Company and Industry Reports

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Mergent Archives is an online database featuring a vast, indexed collection of corporate and industry related documents, containing hundreds of thousands of reports covering over 100 countries and industries. It uses a reliable and easy-to-navigate system designed to meet your historical research needs. The archive includes the following collections:

The Moody’/Mergent Historical Corporate Manual Collection provides every Moody’s corporate manual back to 1909.  This collection provides a comprehensive and in-depth insight into the history of corporate America. The online Manuals collection gives you access to corporate history, business descriptions and detailed financial statements. The set includes the:

  • Industrial Manual since 1920
  • OTC Unlisted Manual since 1986
  • Public Utility Manual since 1914
  • International Manual since 1981
  • OTC Industrial Manual since 1970
  • Bank & Finance Manual since 1928
  • Transportation Manual since 1909.

The Moody’s/Mergent Municipal Manual Collection provides every Moody’s manual back to inception in 1918.  They include approximately 16,500 issuers of municipal securities and the Special Features section in each volume includes:

  • Moody’s Municipal Bond Yield Averages (with charts)
  • Average Yields of U.S. Government Bonds (with charts)
  • Chart showing Comparative Yields on Municipals, Treasure Bonds and Corporate Bonds • Chart showing State Bonds compared with U.S. Treasuries
  • Analysis of State Highway Fund Operations
  • Income Statistics by State.

The Hoover’s Historical Manual Collection covering over 20 years of the various Hoover’s handbooks. The Hoovers products include:

  • Hoover’s Handbook of Private Companies
  • Hoover’s Handbook of World Business
  • Hoover’s Handbook of Emerging Companies
  • Hoover’s Handbook of American Business
  • Hoover’s MasterList of World Business

You can also use Hoover’s and Mergent Online for the most recent company data.

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by: Patricia Dillon Sobczak, assistant professor and collections librarian

Image: Mergent Archives

BCC Research: Global market intelligence

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Research global markets with current and in depth market intelligence. Reports include forecasts, statistical data, major players, market share and more. BCC Research covers 20 industries with a focus on science and technology:

  • Advanced Materials
  • Advanced Transportation Technologies
  • Biotechnology
  • Chemicals
  • Energy and Resources
  • Engineering
  • Environment
  • Food And Beverage
  • Fuel Cell and Battery Technologies
  • Healthcare
  • Information Technology
  • Instrumentation and Sensors
  • Manufacturing
  • Membrane and Separation Technology
  • Nanotechnology
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Photonics
  • Plastics
  • Safety and Security
  • Semiconductor Manufacturing

Under each broad category, individual reports explore specific areas. For example, Food and Beverage includes reports on intelligent packaging, high energy supplements, organic food and food safety. Healthcare includes cancer testing and treatment technology, self-monitoring, medical devices and information technology. These are just a few examples of the full text reports available through BCC Research. Subscribe to their blog for up to date news and more market insight.

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By Bettina Peacemaker, assistant head, academic outreach and business research librarian

Image: 1492, ptwo, flickr, Creative Commons

Portals to the Past: 1898 catalog offers RVA design details

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The newest addition to VCU Libraries’ digital collections featuring architectural elements of the American South is a catalog of doors, windows, mantels and sashes for 1880s buildings.

Thomas E. Stagg was a 19th century Richmond, Va. firm and manufacturer of sashes, blinds and doors for the construction of homes and businesses. Operations were run out of an office and storage space at 1444 E. Main St.

This 1898 “vest-pocket” edition of the Stagg catalog–likely intended to be used on building sites–includes order instructions, price lists and measurements. The Digital Collections catalog is searchable and has hundreds of detailed images of window sashes, doors, columns, mantles, corner and plinth blocks available from the Stagg company.

Many of these architectural and decorative elements are seen throughout Richmond’s historic private and commercial buildings.

According to window restorer and woodworker Dixon Kerr in an article, “How to Copy Vintage Millwork” posted on the Old House Authority website, Richmond was an area prominent in the manufacture of millwork sold throughout the United States. Kerr writes: “In the late 1880s there were approximately a dozen such businesses in Richmond with 30 to 50  employees: Thomas E. Stagg, at 1421 Cary St.; J.J. Montague, at the corner of 9th and Arch Streets; Hare and Tucker, at 2318 Main St.; Whitehurst and Owen, at Byrd and 10th Streets; DuVal & Robertson, at 11th and Porter and 7th & Hull Streets; and Binswanger & Company, at 1427 E. Main St. Binswanger, now a commercial glass company, is still in business; Siewer’s Lumber Company and Ruffin and Payne, still in business, were also in business at the time. Beckstoffer & Son continued in the business until the early 21st century.”

Copyright

Materials in this collection are in the public domain, and thus are free of any copyright restriction. Please acknowledge VCU Libraries if any of the materials are used.

Additional Research Information

The print catalog is housed in Special Collections and Archives at James Branch Cabell Library. For more information, see the catalog record. Please direct reference and research inquires to libjbcsca@vcu.edu or call (804) 828-1108.

Image: Cottage Doors, page 55, Thomas E. Stagg catalog

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Best Bets for Business: Eight choices for avid readers

Stay knowledgeable on all things business with this compilation of business reads:

  • The great workplace how to build it, how to keep it, and why it matters by Michael Burchell, 1967, 2011
    What is the business value of creating a great workplace? As organizations grapple with the complexity and challenges of leveraging human capital in today’s hyper-competitive work world, this resource remains a key source for understanding the essential ingredients in and trends of great places to work. Find It
  • Teaming: What leaders must do to foster organizational learning by Amy C. Edmonson, 2012
    Continuous improvement, understanding complex systems, and promoting innovation are among the learning challenges today’s companies face. Based on years of research, this book shows how leaders can make organizational learning happen by building teams that learn. Find It
  • Mastering turbulence: The essential capabilities of agile and resilient individuals, teams and organizations by Joseph McCann, 2012
    Rapid and disruptive change threatens the adaptive capacity of organizations, along with the individuals and teams leading them. Based upon more than a decade of global research and consulting, Joseph E. McCann and John W. Selsky outline five capabilities of agile and resilient systems. Find It
  • Grounded: How leaders stay rooted in an uncertain world by Bob Rosen, 2013
    A provocative, personal approach to leadership based on in-depth research with hundreds of executives around the world Confronted by disruptive change and economic turbulence, many of today’s leaders find themselves ill-equipped to manage the hazards they now face. They must contend with chronic uncertainty, cynical employees and personal burnout. Few have seen alternatives, until now. Find It
  • From smart to wise: Acting and leading with wisdom by Prasad Kaipa, 2013
    Drawing on inspiring experiences of historical and contemporary wise leaders such as Bill Gates, Warren Buffet, and even Mahatma Gandhi, the authors identify six characteristics of wise leaders and offer a practical framework to help readers develop their own style of wise leadership that is functional and smart. Find It
  • CaseBase: Case studies in global business, edited by Andrew Ashwin, 2012
    Most of these case studies describe business in an international context, providing an overview of key issues from a global perspective, free of specific country bias. Considering different perspectives helps to develop a broader understanding of the business environment. Find It
  • Capital in the twenty-first century by Thomas Piketty, 2014
    Piketty analyzes a unique collection of data from 20 countries, ranging as far back as the 18th century, to uncover economic and social patterns. He shows that modern economic growth and the diffusion of knowledge have allowed us to avoid inequalities. Find It

Compiled by Patricia Sobczak, business and public affairs collections librarian

Image: Elisabeth Leysen

Business School Librarians Q&A: Custom content for business

Q and A with Business School Librariand

For the School of Business, Bettina Peacemaker and Pattie Sobczak collaborate and also act independently in developing the collection, consulting on faculty and student research and teaching course-specific materials.

Both bring business expertise to their roles.

Before becoming a librarian, Sobczak worked in sales, manufacturing and marketing, providing her with industry experience that helps connect students to the world outside the classroom. Leadership is a key research interest. She holds a doctorate in organizational systems, an M.B.A. and a bachelor’s degree in business management.

Peacemaker has worked with the School of Business for more than 10 years as a business research librarian, and also serves as the Assistant Head of Academic Outreach. She has a bachelor’s degree in anthropology and a Master’s in Library Science. She was introduced to management research during a graduate assistantship and has since worked in all areas of business to provide information literacy instruction and library support committed to engaging students with lifelong learning tools and strategies.

What challenges do research and collections librarians face when responding to today’s business curriculum and research needs?

Peacemaker: With more than 3,000 students in undergraduate, graduate and professional part-time programs, VCU’s School of Business is one of the university’s largest and most diverse academic communities. The business research and teaching needs are just as diverse. Communication and conversations with faculty and leadership are critical in my continuing education so that I can make the right decisions for business educators and their students. I actively seek and welcome opportunities to help me gain insight into the research experience including recommended readings, copies of syllabi, and even invitations to work with classes and groups. All of this helps me understand what information resources and strategies students and researchers need to be successful in business both inside the classroom and beyond.

Sobczak: Keeping track of the real-world, fast-moving reality of business and economic information is crucial for a current and relevant collection. I am constantly reading key resources like the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Forbes, The Economist, etc. as well as book reviews and mainstream publications to stay up on the new books, journals, articles, and databases that might be appropriate for the School of Business. Ongoing communication with faculty and students is key to making sure we have the right resources. I like to hear directly from faculty with ideas about possible additions to our business collection.

Can you share an example of how VCU Libraries develops custom content for specific courses or groups?

Peacemaker: With so much information available, it’s important to create content that it is immediately applicable to coursework and research projects, and that’s how I approach my role in instruction and research. When I work with classes, I create online guides that specifically address the information goals of that course. I have examples from almost every area of the business curriculum. I also try to address broader needs based on my work with faculty and students, so I have developed guides that address common areas like marketing and management as well as guides on finding case studies, using business databases for career research and finding sources to help prepare for promotion and tenure.

Sobczak: One way we develop custom collections is when a new course is proposed, I do a detailed analysis of the existing collection pertaining to that discipline to determine if the current collection can support the new course and if not, I purchase materials needed to fully support the new course.

How are priorities for the collection determined?

Sobczak: In the School of Business all of the programs are tied to what is happening in the real world. This means that the collection not only has to have the requisite theoretical resources but also resources about the practice and application of theory. This makes the business collection unique in that we need to find the right balance of resources to support the current and/or future research needs of the school at both the scholar and practitioner level. Also, I am working with faculty to create “Collections of Distinction” as a way to better support specific aspects of the school and to utilize these collections as a way to bring attention to its programs.

Priorities are based on the current and anticipated curriculum and research needs of the faculty and students. Collection development is not done in a vacuum. It happens through ongoing communication and collaboration with me, Bettina, faculty, program chairs, the dean, and others. Also, specific requests for items are handled quickly and given top priority. Make your purchase suggestion at https://apps.library.vcu.edu/forms/purchase

What do many students and faculty not know about the library?

Peacemaker: That they have their own research consultants, librarians who are willing to work one-on-one on projects. VCU Libraries also offers incredible research support for research data management, innovative media production, interlibrary loan, and almost any area of scholarly communications.

Sobczak: The number of resources available to them through the library. Harvard Business Review, Value Line, WARC (World Advertising Research Center), WRDS (Wharton Research Data Services) and Hoover’s are examples of the many resources available online, 24/7.

Current Business Data: Top five business databases

Get the most up-to-date business and industry research with these top five business databases:

  • Best’s Library Center offers full-text insurance reports, credit reports and other in-depth insurance industry information and statistics. It also provides industry news and a look at corporate changes dating back to 1819. Find It
  • Wharton Research Data Services (WRDS) is the leading data research platform and business intelligence tool for more than 30,000 corporate, academic, government and nonprofit clients in 33 countries. WRDS gives access 200 terabytes of data across multiple disciplines including accounting, banking, economics, finance, insurance, marketing and statistics. Find It
  • SimplyMap allows you to create thematic maps and reports using extensive demographic, business and marketing data. SimplyMap has all the data you need to answer key research questions, make sound business decisions and understand the socio-demographic and economic conditions of any geographic area in the United States. It offers more than 75,000 data variables related to demographics, employment, housing, market segments, businesses, consumer spending, brand preferences and public health. Find It
  • WARC offers insight in global advertising and marketing trends through market intelligence, case studies, conference reports, expenditure data, profiles of major brands and consumer behavior, and a collection of advertising campaign videos. This publisher’s portfolio includes Admap, Market Leader, International Journal of Advertising, Journal of Advertising Research and International Journal of Market Research (full-text). Find It
  • Mintel is the go-to source for full-text market research reports covering US and global consumer markets. Reports analyze market share, segmentation and trends. Upon first login, you must register with your VCU email address. Find It

Compiled by Patricia Sobczak, business and public affairs collections librarian

Image: SimplyMap

Business Databases: Five business resources

These business and industry databases are a great resource for students of business, advertising and mass communications, as well as researchers interested in business trends, entrepreneurship and corporate work.

  • IBISWorld: Reports for all 723 U.S. industries categorized by NAICS include market size, competitors, forecasting, business valuations, benchmarking, business environment and global industry reports. A new module includes specialized industries such as forensic accounting services, popcorn production, psychic services, ice cream making machinery manufacturing, fantasy sport services and medical marijuana growing. Find It
  • Plunkett Research Online: Analysis and market research for industry sectors like trend analysis, statistics, organizations, company profiles and information for job-seekers. Plunkett covers some 30 industries plus Asian companies, Canadian industries, international companies and middle market companies. Find It
  • PrivCo: Business and financial data on major, non-publicly traded corporations, including family-owned, private equity-owned, venture-backed and internationally-unlisted companies. PrivCo pulls back the curtain on private businesses such as Subway, pinkberry, IKEA, J. Crew, Levis, Arby’s, Brooks Brothers, Twitter, Chanel and 80,000 more businesses that make up most of our major corporations. Find It
  • WARC: Global advertising and marketing trends, including market intelligence, case studies, conference reports, expenditure data, profiles of major brand owners, consumer insight and a collection of advertising campaign videos. This publisher’s portfolio includes Admap, Market Leader, International Journal of Advertising, Journal of Advertising Research and International Journal of Market Research (full-text). Find It
  • Best’s Library Center: Full-text insurance reports, credit reports and other in-depth insurance industry information and statistics. It also provides insurance industry news and a look at corporate changes dating back to 1819. Find It

Compiled by Bettina Peacemaker, business research librarian

Image: Creative Commons