Tag Archives: community pharmacy

What are DIRs?

Prescription drug pricing and reimbursement are complicated and confusing as it is.  DIRs have only made them more so.  And much more painful for community pharmacies.

What are DIRs?

DIR stands for Direct and Indirect Remuneration.  The term was initially used by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to refer to all price concessions which PBMs and plan sponsors (insurance companies, HMOs, chains and PBMs offering Medicare Part D plans) receive for Part D prescription drugs that were not included in the point of sale transaction (i.e., when the drug was dispensed to the patient and the charge sent to the plan sponsor or PBM).  CMS reconciles payments to plan sponsors at the end of each year and one of the reconciliation involves reducing plan reimbursements by the amount of the DIRs received by plan sponsors.

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What’s the average price of a prescription?

For most of my career, it’s been pretty simple to find good estimates of the average price of a prescription.  But for the last several years it has not been.  You would think that simply Googling “average prescription price” would provide links to several sites that would provide this information.  You would be wrong.  The closest estimate I could find online was a study commissioned by Prime Therapeutics that found the average net ingredient costs from Prime compared with its competitors.

Using “mean prescription price” doesn’t work either.  This is all the more surprising given that many PBMs – Express Scripts, CVS/Caremark, Catamaran, and Prime Therapeutics – publish annual drug trend reports.

I’m frequently asked about the average prescription price, so I did what a good PhD advisor should do and asked my graduate students to find it.  Specifically, I asked three graduate students – Anisha Patel, Batul Electricwala, and Della Varghese – to calculate the average prescription price for all prescriptions and for selected therapeutic categories from the latest data available from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).

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Who will provide clinical pharmacy services in the community?

Recent legislation and new products have resulted in a number of new clinical service opportunities for pharmacists in community settings.  These include providing naloxone to patients who may be at risk for opioid overdose and their family members; providing counseling, education and monitoring for patients taking specialty drugs (biologics); collaborative drug therapy management with physicians; and providing oral contraceptives without a prescription.

A big reason for these opportunities is the wide spread availability of community pharmacies. Community pharmacists are available in geographic areas and at times that physicians and other prescribers are not.  And, consumers visit community pharmacies a lot more frequently than they visit other health care providers or sites. Continue reading